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80 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
While industry grew significantly in the 1920s, the national per-capita income actually decreased.
False
Beyond stimulating the American economy, the automobile also dramatically changed American life.
True
For the most part, industrial workers were better off economically than farmers in the 1920s.
True
In spite of serious economic problems in the North during the 1920s, African Americans there were better off than African Americans in the South.
True
The economic trends of the 1920s were almost entirely positive in character, and provided few signs that the economy might falter in the years to come.
False
The 1920s witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of women working outside the home.
False
Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment had a dramatic impact on the economic status of women in the 1920s.
False
During the 1920s, spectator sports increased tremendously in popularity.
True
For the most part, writers in the 1920s shared a sense of hope and wrote optimistically of the promises of American life.
False
William Jennings Bryan was famous for his statement, "The business of America is business."
False
The Federal Reserve's monetary policies of the 1920s actually contributed to the speculative boom that led to the stock market crash of 1929.
True
A fundamental cause of the Great Depression was that income had not been distributed evenly enough to give people the purchasing power to buy all the consumer goods being produced.
True
A major political impact of the Great Depression was the strengthening of the Republican party.
False
The Supreme Court declared the National Recovery Administration unconstitutional.
True
The only consistently healthy sector of the economy by the early 1930s was agriculture.
False
The Townsend Plan was a forerunner of the National Labor Relations Act.
False
The Social Security Act of 1935 included a program of national health insurance.
False
The New Deal did far less for Mexican Americans than for African Americans.
True
The Indian Reorganization Act was designed to help Native Americans become self-sufficient farmers.
False
The 1930s witnessed no significant gain in the status of American women.
True
Eventually, Germany defaulted on her reparations payments in the 1920s, and the Allied powers defaulted on their loan repayments to the United States.
True
At the beginning of his presidency, FDR wanted the United States to avoid involvement in foreign squabbles.
True
The Washington Conference delegates agreed to reaffirm the Open Door policy in China.
True
In the 1930s, Americans' memories of World War I were largely positive and had little effect on foreign policy.
False
In the election of 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Wendell Willkie.
True
In the conduct of foreign policy, FDR was very pragmatic.
True
In the election of 1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt narrowly defeated Harry Truman for the presidency.
False
At the end of World War II, Japan surrendered before Germany surrendered.
False
At the Yalta Conference in 1945, Stalin promised to commit the Soviet Union to joining the war against Japan.
True
Revenge for Pearl Harbor had little to do with the decision to drop atomic bombs on Japan in August 1945.
False
After World War II, the United States spent billions of dollars helping to rebuild the Soviet Union.
False
The Baruch Plan called for the United States to unilaterally destroy its stockpile of nuclear weapons.
False
In its initial plans for atomic disarmament, the United States intended to turn control of its fissionable material and nuclear processing plants over to an international agency.
True
The Marshall Plan was a great political and economic success for the United States.
True
By convincing the Soviets of the firm intentions of the United States and its allies, NATO had the effect of de-escalating the Cold War.
False
In 1949 Communist forces took control of China.
True
The American public reacted well when President Truman relieved General MacArthur from duty.
False
Senator Joseph McCarthy gained great credibility during the Red Scare of the 1950s because of his scrupulous attention to validated facts concerning Communist espionage activities in the United States.
False
During the Battle of Dien Bien Phu in 1954, the United States provided air strikes in support of French troops.
False
The launching of Sputnik made Americans fear that the Russians were several years ahead of the United States in the development of intercontinental ballistic missiles.
True
During the 1950s, city populations actually grew more rapidly than suburban populations.
False
The growth of suburban populations in the 1950s was inextricably linked to the boom in automobile sales.
True
One striking feature of the 1950s was the abundance of self-criticism.
True
Harry Truman's Fair Deal program was a resounding success.
False
Harry Truman's attempts to carry on the traditions of Franklin D. Roosevelt were hampered by his tendency to seek too much too soon.
True
One of the few successes of Harry Truman's Fair Deal program was the enactment of his plan for medical insurance for all Americans.
False
Dwight D. Eisenhower, because of his extensive military background, assumed the presidency with the idea of actively pursuing key programs and expanding the powers of his office.
False
Dwight D. Eisenhower was the only president of the twentieth century to balance the federal budget during each of his eight years in office.
False
Compared with previous presidents, Harry Truman was strongly committed to civil rights.
True
The Supreme Court decisions declaring segregation illegal were readily and eagerly accepted by most Americans in the 1950s.
False
The televised Nixon-Kennedy debates had relatively little impact on the outcome of the presidential election of 1960.
False
Upon assuming the presidency, John F. Kennedy broke dramatically with the foreign policy of his predecessor, Dwight D. Eisenhower.
False
The main reason for the construction of the Berlin Wall was to stop the flow of brains and talent to the West.
True
The Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in 1961 turned out to be a political triumph for President John F. Kennedy.
False
In the early 1960s, the civil rights movement willingly accepted John F. Kennedy's indirect approach to civil rights problems.
False
Unlike Eisenhower, Kennedy provided presidential leadership for the civil rights movement.
True
During the 1960s, the Supreme Court strengthened the rights of accused criminals.
True
President John F. Kennedy was far superior to President Lyndon Johnson in working with Congress.
False
In the election of 1964, Lyndon Johnson barely received enough votes for reelection.
False
Richard Nixon defeated Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 presidential election.
True
By the end of the 1970s, Ronald Regan was recognized as the nation's most effective spokesman for the conservative resurgence.
True
Richard Nixon opposed liberal social programs and halted the growth of the federal bureaucracy.
False
Nixon and Kissinger saw the Cold War not as a death struggle to be won but as a long-term rivalry to be managed.
True
The invasion of Cambodia in 1970 precipitated widespread antiwar protests.
True
President Richard Nixon readily admitted soon after the Watergate break-in that his administration had obstructed justice.
False
Jerry Falwell led the pro-choice fight to guarantee a woman's right to have an abortion.
False
One of the major reasons for Jimmy Carter's political problems in 1980 was his failure to resolve the foreign-policy crisis in Iran.
True
Under Jimmy Carter, Cold War tensions increased.
True
Just as he promised during the presidential election campaign of 1980, Ronald Reagan achieved significant cuts in federal domestic spending during his administration.
True
One major goal of the Reagan administration was to reduce the interference of the federal government in business affairs.
True
By the early 1990s, the Northeast began experiencing more population gains than either the South or the West.
False
By the 1990s, the percentage of elderly people in the U.S. population was much higher than it had been in 1900.
True
In the White House, Bill Clinton proved to be the most adept politician since Franklin D. Roosevelt.
True
President Clinton was far more interested in foreign policy than in domestic issues.
False
The most conspicuous failure of Bill Clinton's first presidential term was his proposal for national health insurance.
True
In the elections of 1994, Republicans took control of both houses of Congress.
True
One of Bill Clinton's most important foreign-policy achievements was his success in getting Ukraine to surrender its stockpile of nuclear weapons.
True
For many voters, the 2000 presidential election seemed to offer a choice between material abundance and moral values.
True
Attorney General John Ashcroft was criticized for his crackdown on organized crime.
False
The main domestic accomplishment of George W. Bush's second presidential term was the partial privatization of Social Security.
False