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28 Cards in this Set

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Kell
K=k+
K+k=
K+k+
Kp(a+b=)
Kp(a=b+)
Kp(a+b+)
Js(a+b=)
Js(a=b+)
Js(a+b+)
Duffy
Fy(a+b=)
Fy(a=b+)
Fy(a+b+)
Fy(a=b=)
Kidd
Jk(a+b=)
Jk(a=b+)
Jk(a+b+)
Jk(a=b=)
Lutheran
Lu(a+b=)
Lu(a=b+)
Lu(a+b+)
Lu(a=b=)
Ii
"i-cord'
"I-adult"
"i-adult"
"I-cord"
P
P1
P2
P1k
P2k
p
MNS
MM
MN
NN
SS
Ss
ss
U neg
Roughly what % or the population has the "M" antigen?
About 75%
78% white
70% black
What % of the population has the "s" antigen?
89% white
97% black
How difficult would it be to find compatible cells for someone with an ANti-m?
It would be relatively easy because a great portion of the population has the M antigen; then, approximately 25% would be compatable. 1 in 4 units would be compatable
How difficult would it be fto find compatible cells for someone with an Anti-s?
Pretty difficult because only 10% of the white and 3% fo the black population lacks this antigen. only 1 in 10 units would be compatible.
Which of the P blood group antigens are "high-frequency" antigens?
P, and Pk
Which P group antibody would you expect to find most frequently in the clinical lab?
Anti-P1
What is Donath Landsteiner and why is it called an autoantibody?
Anti-P antibody, hemolytic IgG that usually is encountered in patients with Paroxysmal Cold Hemoglobinuria (PCH). It is called an autoantibody, because it turns into an antibody for a self-antigen. IgG autoanti-P binds to P positive RBC's and activates complement at low temperatures, causing hemolysis to occur at warmer temps.
Would you expect Anti-I to be a cause of HDN?
No, IgM's cannot cross the placenta and newborns are I neg
Why are antibodies to k, Kpb and Jsb rarely found?
These are high frequency antigens; the corresponding antibody will be rarely found
Why is it uncommon to find antibodies to Kpa and Jsa?
These antigens are co-dominant alleles on closely linked loci with Kpb and Jsb; they produce low frequencies.
Would it be difficult to find donor cells for a patient with Anti-Kpa and Anti-Jsa?
No, it would be easy; donor units possessing these antigens are uncommon.
How common is the Lub antigen?
100% of the population have this antigen
Name 2 reasons why anti-Lua is not associated with HDN.
-IgM
-poorly developed at birth
List the blood groups that would show stronger reactions following enzyme treatment.
-Kidd
-P
-Ii
-Lewis
-Rh(not D)
List the blood groups that would show weaker or missing reactions following enzyme treatment.
-Duffy
-Xga
-MN
List the blood groups that would show no change following enzyme treatment.
-Lutheran
-Kell
-'D'
What blood groups show variable reactivity following enzyme treatment.
-S
-s
-U
-IgG
-Produced in response to antigen exposure
-Ab agglutinate optimally in IAT
-Ab do not bind complement
-TRX/HDN
-Anti-K is the most common antibody
Kell blood group
-Agglutination reactions are best observed in IAT
-Antibodies do not bind complement
-TRX
-Can show dosage
-Anti-Fya is more common than anti-Fyb
Duffy blood group
-Does show dosage
-Binds complement
-Produced through antigen exposure
-Antibodies do not store well
-Phenotype frequencies tend to vary among the population.
Kidd blood group
Can be present without RBC stimulation
-IgM and IgG
-Has characteristic mixed-field pattern of agglutination
-Mild cases of HDN
Anti-Lua