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91 Cards in this Set

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Downsizing
A reduction in the number of people employed by a firm (also known as restructuring, and rightsizing)
Internal employee relations
Those human resource management activities associated with the movement of employees within the organization.
Discipline
The state of employee self-control and orderly conduct
Disciplinary action
The invoking of a penalty against an employee who fails to meet organizational standards or comply with organizational rules.
Progressive disciplinary action
An approach to disciplinary action designed to ensure that the minimum penalty appropriate to the offense is imposed.
Disciplinary action without punishment
A process in which a worker is given time off with pay to think about whether he or she wants to follow the rules and continue working for the company.
Grievance
An employee’s dissatisfaction or feeling of personal injustice relating to his or her employment.
Alternative dispute resolution (ADR)
A procedure agreed to ahead of time by the employee and the company for resolving any problems that may arise.
Employment at will
An unwritten contract created when an employee agrees to work for an employer but no agreement exists as to how long the parties expect the employment to last.
Demotion
The process of moving a worker to a lower level of duties and responsibilities
Outplacement
A company procedure that assists a laid-off employee in finding employment elsewhere.
Transfer
The lateral movement of a worker within an organization.
Promotion
The movement of a person to a higher-level position in an organization.
Exit interview
A means of revealing the real reasons employees leave their jobs, providing the organization with information on how to correct the causes of discontent, and reducing employee turnover.
Attitude survey
A survey of employees feelings about topics such as the work they perform, their supervisor, their work environment, flexibility in the workplace, opportunities for advancement, training and development opportunities, and the firm’s compensation system.
Downsizing, also known as restructuring and rightsizing
This is essentially the reverse of a company growing and suggests a one-time change in the organization and the number of people employed
Internal employee relations
This consist of the human resource management activities associated with the movement of employees within the firm after they have become organizational members.
Discipline
is the state of employee self-control and orderly conduct present within an organization
disciplinary action
invokes a penalty against an employee who fails to meet established standards
Hot stove rule
According to this approach, disciplinary action should be immediate and impersonal
Punish immediately, provides warning, gives consistent punishment, and punish impersonally
According to the Hot stove rule approach, disciplinary action should have what consequences?
Progressive disciplinary action
Intended to ensure that the minimum penalty appropriate to the offense is imposed.
Progressive disciplinary action
The use of this type of action involves answering a series of questions about the severity of offenses.
lack of training, fear, the only one, loss of friendship, time loss, loss of temper, and rationalization
Name 3 reasons why managers want to avoid disciplinary action?
A grievance
An employee’s dissatisfaction or feeling of personal injustice relating to his or her employment relationship
ARBITRATION
The process that allows the parties to submit their dispute to an impartial third party for resolution
ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
ADR
ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION
A procedure whereby the employee and the company agree that any problems will be addressed by an agreed-upon means ahead of time.
TERMINATION
Termination is the most severe penalty that an organization can impose on an employee, and therefore it should be the most carefully considered disciplinary action.
EMPLOYMENT AT WILL
An unwritten contract that is created when an employee agrees to work for an employer, but there is no agreement as to how long the parties expect the employment to last.
DEMOTION
The process of moving a worker to a lower level of duties and responsibilities, which typically involves a reduction in pay.
OUTPLACEMENT
Laid-off employees are given assistance in finding employment elsewhere
TRANSFERS
The lateral movement of a worker within an organization
PROMOTION
The movement of a person to a higher level position in the company.
RESIGNATION
Even when an organization is totally committed to making its environment a good place to work, workers will still resign
The Exit Interview
A means of revealing the real reasons employees leave their jobs, providing the organization with information on how to correct the causes of discontent, and reducing employee turnover
Attitude Surveys
Seek input from employees to determine their feelings about topics such as the work they perform, their supervisor, their work environment, flexibility in the workplace, opportunities for advancement, training and development opportunities, and the firm’s compensation system.
2 weeks
Most firms would like to have at least how many weeks notice of resignation from departing workers
RETIREMENT
Most long-term employees leave an organization through this means
Checklists and quantitative measures
What are the two basic methods that may be used to evaluate human resource management activities?
CHECKLIST APPROACH
The checklist is an evaluation in terms of what should be done and the extent to which it is being done
QUANTITATIVE APPROACH
Relies on the accumulation of various types of numerical data and the calculation of certain ratios from them
Rights
The powers, privileges, or interests that belong to a person by law, nature, or tradition
Responsibilities
These are obligations to perform certain tasks and duties
Statutory rights
These are rights based on laws and statutes
Contractual rights
Rights based on a specific contract between an employer and an employee, such as a labor contract
Employment contract
This outlines the details of employment
Non-compete agreements
These prohibit individuals who leave the organization from competing with an employer in the same line of business for a specified period of time
Non-piracy agreements
These bar former employees from soliciting business from former customers and clients for a specified period of time
Non-solicitation of current employees
These clauses are written to prevent a former employee from contacting or encouraging co-workers at the former firm to join a different company, often a competitor
Implied Contracts
Unwritten employer expectations about what is acceptable behavior or performance on the part of the employee
Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI)
These typically cover employer costs for legal fees, settlements, and judgments associated with employment actions
Employment Practices Liability Insurance (EPLI)
Workplace litigation has reached epidemic proportions as employees who feel that their rights have been violated sue their employers. Therefore it is common for employers to purchase this type of insurance.
Employment-at-will (EAW)
This is a common-law doctrine stating that employers have the right to hire, fire, demote, or promote whomever they choose, unless there is a law or a contract to the contrary
Public policy exception
This permits employees to sue for wrongful discharge for refusing to support an action contrary to public policy. Perjury is an example
Implied contract exception
This is granted employees who perform satisfactorily in the absence of information that their employment is not subject to termination at will. Long service, promises of continued employment, and lack of criticism of job performance imply continuing employment
Good-faith and fair-dealing
This is expected of the employer. Employees who have had their faith breached by unreasonable employer behavior may sue for wrongful discharge
Wrongful discharge
The termination of an individual’s employment for reasons that are improper or illegal
Fortune v. National Cash Register Company (NCR)
In this case the court concluded that a company wrongfully discharged an employee to avoid paying a big commission to the employee
Constructive discharge
Deliberately making conditions intolerable to get an employee to quit
Just cause
Reasonable justification for taking employment-related action.
Due process
The requirement that the employer use fair means to determine employee wrongdoing and/or disciplinary measures, and that the employee have an opportunity to explain and defend his or her actions
Distributive justice
The perceived fairness in the distribution of outcomes
Procedural justice
The perceived fairness of the process used to make decisions about employees
“open door” policy
Policy that anyone with a complaint can talk with a manager, an HR rep, or an executive
Arbitration
A process that uses a neutral third party to make a decision
Compulsory arbitration
When employees sign preemployment agreements stating that all disputes will be submitted to arbitration
Circuit City v. Adams
In this case the Supreme Court upheld arbitration as a condition of employment
EEOC v. Waffle House
In this case the court ruled that the EEOC could intervene despite an arbitration ruling
Peer Review Panels
These are composed of specially trained volunteer employees who have signed confidentiality agreements and the company empowers them to hear appeals from other employees who have been disciplined. They then make recommendations or decisions
Ombuds or ombudsman or ombudsperson
A person outside the normal chain of command who acts as a problem solver for management and employees
Right to privacy
An individual’s freedom from unauthorized and unreasonable intrusion into their personal affairs
The Privacy Act of 1974
This act includes provisions affecting HR record-keeping systems for federal agencies. While this law applies only to federal agencies and those providing services to the federal government, many states have passed similar laws
The ADA
This act requires that information from all medical examinations and inquiries must be kept apart from general personnel files as a separate confidential
ADA and HIPAA
Name two acts that specifically include regulations designed to protect the privacy of employee medical records
Whistle-blowers
Individuals who report real or perceived wrongs committed by their employers
The Employee Polygraph Protection Act
This act prohibits the use of polygraphs for most pre-employment screening
Pencil-and-paper honesty tests
These are alternatives to polygraph testing
Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions (FACT)
This act allows employers to hire outside investigators without first notifying the individuals under investigation or getting their permission
Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988
This act requires government contractors to take steps to eliminate employee drug usage
Policies
These are general guidelines that regulate organizational actions
Procedures
These are customary methods of handling activities
Rules
These are specific guidelines that regulate and restrict the behavior of individuals
Employee Handbooks
These give employees a reference source for company policies and rules and can be a positive tool for effective management of human resources
Downward communication
This type of communication flows from top management to keep employees informed about company plans and management’s expectations
Upward communication
This type of communication lets managers know about the ideas, concerns, and attitudes of employees
Discipline
A form of training that enforces organizational rules
Positive Discipline Approach
This approach builds on the philosophy that violations are actions that can be constructively corrected without penalty
Counseling, written documentation, final warning, and discharge
What are the four steps to positive discipline?
Progressive Discipline Approach
This approach incorporates a sequence of steps into the shaping of employee behaviors with each step becoming successively more severe
Separation agreement
Agreement where an employee who is being terminated agrees not to sue the employer, in exchange for specified benefits, such as additional severance pay or other “considerations”