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29 Cards in this Set

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In sooth, I know not why I am so sad:It wearies me; you say it wearies you;But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,I am to learn;And such a want-wit sadness makes of me,That I have much ado to know myself.
Antonio - has no real reason to be sad


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, Scene 1
‘Tis not unknown to you, Antonio, How much I have disabled mine estate,. . . To you, Antonio, I owe the most, in money and in love, And from your love I have a warranty To unburden all my plots and purposes How to get clear of all the debts I owe.
Bassaoni-- motivation at first to Marry Portia. First concern in marriage is money. Language about oweing and debts


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, Scene 1
In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft,I shot his fellow of the self-same flight The self-same way with more advised watch, To find the other forth, and by adventuring both I oft found both.
Antonio- Augument about archary, if he lost an arrow he would try to shoot another arrow - risks a 2nd arrow to be rewarded with finding both arrows. Antonio & Bassanio


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 1
In Belmont is a lady richly left; And she is fair, and, fairer than that word, Of wondrous virtues: sometimes from her eyes I did receive fair speechless messages: Her name is Portia, nothing undervalued To Cato's daughter, Brutus' Portia.
Bassanio - Rich,Beautiful, Virtue (interesting wording)


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 1
Thou know'st that all my fortunes are at sea; Neither have I money nor commodity To raise a present sum: therefore go forth; Try what my credit can in Venice do: That shall be rack'd, even to the uttermost, To furnish thee to Belmont, to fair Portia. Go, presently inquire, and so will I, Where money is, and I no question make
Antonio - is risky but because of that he does not have cash flow. Go to Belmont, Antonio is willing to put himself in a Bond for Bassanio. Torture motive. Money & Debt


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scen 1
PORTIA By my troth, Nerissa, my little body is aweary of this great world.

NERISSA You would be, sweet madam, if your miseries were in the same abundance as your good fortunes are: and yet, for aught I see, they are as sick that surfeit with too much as they that starve with nothing. It is no mean happiness therefore, to be seated in the mean
Portia is also bored and Nerissa responds that Portia may feel sad, but she has no reason to be sad. Being in the mean of happiness is the goal.


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 2
Your father was ever virtuous; and holy men at their death have good inspirations: therefore the lottery, that he hath devised in these three chests of gold, silver and lead, whereof who chooses his meaning chooses you, will, no doubt, never be chosen by any rightly but one who shall rightly love
Bassanio - fairytale elements. Importance of caskets and meaning of each verse appearance. Risk involved with love it is just not deserve or desire


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 2
I hate him for he is a Christian,But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice.If I can catch him once upon the hip,I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear himy
Shylock - First response, has an alternative motive with Antonio. Audience should be suspicious


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 3
This kindness will I show.Go with me to a notary, seal me there Your single bond; and, in a merry sport, If you repay me not on such a day, In such a place, such sum or sums as are Express'd in the condition, let the forfeit Be nominated for an equal pound Of your fair flesh, to be cut off and taken In what part of your body pleaseth me.
Shylock - Merry sort of agreement...just a joke. It is not the kind of judgement that anyone would take seriously.


Merchant of Venice --
Act 1, scene 3
The first, of gold, who this inscription bears, “Who chooseth me shall gain what many men desire;” The second, silver, which this promise carries, “Who chooseth me shall get as much as he deserves;” This third, dull lead, with warning all as blunt, “Who chooseth me must give and hazard all he hath.”
What is stated on the caskets - desire, deserve and love


Merchant of Venice --
Act 2, scene 2
I must needs tell thee all. She hath directed How I shall take her from her father's house, What gold and jewels she is furnish'd with, What page's suit she hath in readiness. If e'er the Jew her father come to heaven, It will be for his gentle daughter's sake: . . . Come, go with me; peruse this as thou goest: Fair Jessica shall be my torch-bearer.
Lorenzo talking about taking Jessica from her father without paying.

Merchant of Venice
Act II, scene 4
All that glitters is not gold; Often have you heard that told: Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold: Gilded tombs do worms enfold. Had you been as wise as bold, Young in limbs, in judgment old, Your answer had not been inscroll'd: Fare you well; your suit is cold
What the note says in the casket that Morroco chooses. Gold is not the right answer -- desire

Merchant of Venice
Act II, scene 7
What's here? the portrait of a blinking idiot, Presenting me a schedule! I will read it. How much unlike art thou to Portia! How much unlike my hopes and my deservings! “Who chooseth me shall have as much as he deserves.” Did I deserve no more than a fool's head? Is that my prize? are my deserts no better?
What the note says in the casket that Arragon chooses. deserve


Merchant of Venice
Act II, scene 9
Hath not a Jew eyes? hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions? fed with the same food, hurt with the same weapons, subject to the same diseases, healed by the same means, warmed and cooled by the same winter and summer, as a Christian is? If you prick us, do we not bleed? if you tickle us, do we not laugh? if you poison us, do we not die?
Shylock - A jew is a person just like a Christian. We are so alike.

Merchant of Venice
Act III, scene 1
And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that. If a Jew wrong a Christian, what is his humility? Revenge. If a Christian wrong a Jew, what should his sufferance be by Christian example? Why, revenge. The villany you teach me, I will execute, and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.
Shylock - Tolerance...Revenge even better if we are wrong like we have learned from Christians
Merchant of Venice
Act III, scene 1
You that choose not by the view, Chance as fair and choose as true! Since this fortune falls to you, Be content and seek no new, If you be well pleased with this And hold your fortune for your bliss, Turn you where your lady is And claim her with a loving kiss
What the note states in the casket that Basanio chooses. Fulfulls the Bond with the suite and the Father.

Merchant of Venice
Act III, scene 2
Fair lady, by your leave; I come by note, to give and to receive. Like one of two contending in a prize, That thinks he hath done well in people's eyes, Hearing applause and universal shout, Giddy in spirit, still gazing in a doubt Whether these pearls of praise be his or no; So, thrice fair lady, stand I, even so;As doubtful whether what I see be true,Until confirm'd, sign'd, ratified by you
Bassanio - suggests that the woman does have a say and must consent to the marriage for it being a real marriage.


Merchant of Venice
Act III, scene 2
This house, these servants and this same myself Are yours, my lord: I give them with this ring; Which when you part from, lose, or give away, Let it presage the ruin of your love And be my vantage to exclaim on you.
Portia - full filling bond with father. Intellectually he has choosen and risks, the ring is an emotional thing that must be proven bond and Basanio not forfiting the ring will solidify the promise Portia has made on behalf of her father.

Merchant of Venice
Act III, scene 2
What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong? You have among you many a purchased slave, Which, like your asses and your dogs and mules, You use in abject and in slavish parts, Because you bought them: shall I say to you, Let them be free, marry them to your heirs? Why sweat they under burthens? . . . You will answer “The slaves are ours:” so do I answer you: The pound of flesh, which I demand of him, Is dearly bought; 'tis mine and I will have it.
Shylock is making the connection to slavery which is considered wrong and the pound of flesh is a possession

Merchant of Venice
Act IV, Scene 1
The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest; It blesseth him that gives and him that takes: 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest: it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown;. . . But mercy is above this sceptred sway; It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,It is an attribute to God himself; And earthly power doth then show likest God's When mercy seasons justice
Portia is talking about the fact that Shylock should be merciful toward Antonio. And the bond can be paid. Idea of forgiving is part of and the best quality of Gods judgement and mercy after death. Christian verses Jewish. Old testement vs New testement.

Merchant of Venice
Act IV, Scene i
Therefore, Jew, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That, in the course of justice, none of us Should see salvation: we do pray for mercy; And that same prayer doth teach us all to render The deeds of mercy. I have spoke thus much To mitigate the justice of thy plea; Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Must needs give sentence 'gainst the merchant there.
Portia

Merchant of Venice
Act 5, scene 1
Antonio, I am married to a wife Which is as dear to me as life itself; But life itself, my wife, and all the world, Are not with me esteem'd above thy life.
I would lose all, ay, sacrifice them all Here to this devil, to deliver you.
Bassanio - choice of the lead casket is reflection of his true character


Merchant of Venice
Act 4, scene 7
Tarry a little; there is something else. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood; The words expressly are 'a pound of flesh:'Take then thy bond, take thou thy pound of flesh; But, in the cutting it, if thou dost shed One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate Unto the state of Venice
Portia - Venice can still proceed against Shylock because he conspired (tried) to have Antonio killed


Merchant of Venice
Act 4, scene 7
So please my lord the duke and all the court To quit the fine for one half of his goods, I am content; so he will let me have The other half in use, to render it, Upon his death, unto the gentleman That lately stole his daughter: Two things provided more, that, for this favour, He presently become a Christian; The other, that he do record a gift, Here in the court, of all he dies possess'd, Unto his son Lorenzo and his daughter.
Antonio - Forgives Shylock his half goods, but must become Christain. Salvation, Frogiveness from Christ. Opens path to heaven.


Merchant of Venice
Act 4, scene 1
He is well paid that is well satisfied; And I, delivering you, am satisfied And therein do account myself well paid: My mind was never yet more mercenary. I pray you, know me when we meet again: I wish you well, and so I take my leave.
Merchant of Venice
Act 4, scene 1
PORTIA I see, sir, you are liberal in offers You taught me first to beg; and now methinks You teach me how a beggar should be answer'd.

BASS Good sir, this ring was given me by my wife;
And when she put it on, she made me vow
That I should neither sell nor give nor lose it.
Merchant of Venice
Act 4, scene 1
PORTIA If you had known the virtue of the ring,
Or half her worthiness that gave the ring,
Or your own honour to contain the ring,
You would not then have parted with the ring.
Merchant of Venice
Act V, scene 1
PORTIA Pardon me, Bassanio. For by this ring,
the doctor lay with me.

NERISSA And pardon me, my gentle Gratiano;
For that same scrubbed boy, the doctor’s clerk
In lieu of this last night did lie with me.

GRATIANO Why, this is like the mending of
highways In summer, where the ways are fair enough. What, are we cuckolds ere we have deserv’d it?
Merchant of Venice
Act 5, scene 1
GRATIANO Well, while I live I’ll fear no other
thing So sore as keeping safe Nerissa’s ring.
Merchant of Venice
Act 5, scene 1