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24 Cards in this Set

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Adequacy (Dietary)
Providing all the essential nutrients, fiber, and energy in amounts sufficient to mainttain health.
Balance (Dietary)
Providing foods in proportion to each other and in proportion to the body's needs.
kcalorie (Energy) Control
Management of food energy intake
Nutrient Density
A measure of the nutrients a food provides relative to the energy it provides. The more nutrients and the fewer kcalories, the higher the nutrient density.
Empty-kcalorie Foods
A popular term used to denote foods that contribute energy but lack protein, vitamins, and minerals.
Moderation (Dietary)
Providing enough but not too much of a substance
Variety (Dietary)
Eating a wide selection of foods within and among the major food groups.
Food Group Plans
Diet-planning tools that sort foods into groups based on nutrient content and specify the amount of foods that people should eat from each group.
Legumes
Plants of the bean and pea family, with seeds that are rich in protein compared with other plant-derived foods.
Discretionary kcalorie Allowance
The kcalories remaining in a person's energy allowance after consuming enough nutrient-dense foods to meet all nutrient needs for a day.
Healthy Eating Index
A measure developed by the USDA for assessing how well a diet conforms to the recommendations of the USDA Food Guide and the Dietary Guidelines For Americans.
Exchange Lists
Diet-planning tools that organize foods by their proportions of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Foods on any single list can be used interchangeably.
Processed Foods
Foods that have been treated to change their physical, chemical, microbiological, or sensory properties.
Fortified
The addition to a food of nutrients that were either not present or not present in significant amounts. This is used to correct widespread deficiencies.
Refined
The process by which the coarse parts of a food are removed. When wheat is refined into flour, the bran, germ, and husk are removed, leaving only the endosperm.
Enriched
The addition to a food of nutrients that were lost during processing so that the food will meet a specific standard.
Whole Grain
A grain milled in its entirety, not refined.
Textured Vegetable Protein
Processed soybean protein used in vegetarian products such as soy burgers.
Imitation Foods
Foods that substitute for and resemble another food, but are nutritionally inferior. If it's not nutritionally inferior, it doesn't need the label "immitation"
Food Substitutes
Foods that are designed to replace other foods.
Daily Values (DV)
Reference values developed by the FDA specifically for use on food labels.
Nutrient Claims
Statements that characterize the quantity of a nutrient in a food.
Health Claims
Statements that characterize the relationship between a nutrient or other substance in a food and a disease or health-related condition.
Structure-Function Claims
Statements that characterize the relationship between a nutrient or other substance in a food and its role in the body.