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12 Cards in this Set

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"Of the various fronts in the nation's "war on drugs," none seems more perverse and pointless than the raids that Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft pressed Drug Enforcement Administration agents to stage against patients treating themselves with medical marijuana under Proposition 215, a law that California voters passed eight years ago."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. November 30, 2004. December 1, 2004.
"On Monday, two of those patients [Angel Raich and Diane Monson] struck back, appealing their right to treatment to the U.S. Supreme Court."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. November 30, 2004. December 1, 2004.
"Ashcroft's lawyers argued...that the government had every right to prosecute because Congress in 1970 decreed that marijuana was a Schedule 1 drug, a chemical devoid of any possible medicinal value and illegal in all uses."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. November 30, 2004. December 1, 2004.
since 1970 -
"Most medical authorities, including the National Academy of Sciences, agree that marijuana can be superior to other substances for the treatment or alleviation of some grave disorders."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. November 30, 2004. December 1, 2004.
Congress should press his [John Ashcroft, Attourney General] likely successor, Alberto Gonzales, to call off the medical marijuana attack dogs. Legislators should also press federal regulators to move marijuana out of Schedule 1 to a lower classification."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. November 30, 2004. December 1, 2004.
"The Supreme Court probably won't rule on the marijuana case for months. Congress and the White House could act much faster, bringing federal policy in line with science and society."
"A Kinder Pot Policy." The LA Times. Novermber 30, 2004. Decmeber 1, 2004.
"California is one of the eleven states currently that allows some kind of medical marijuana by law."
<http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2004/11/23/raichVAshcroftAGuideToTheS.html>.
this site wasnt by the government or official or anything, but hte dude seemed to know what he was tlaking about. good background site.
Angel Raich and Diane Monson sued the federal government on October 9, 2002 since they couldn't use marajuiana, even though state and local laws said it was ok.
http://blogs.salon.com/0002762/stories/2004/11/23/raichVAshcroftAGuideToTheS.html
"Angel Raich, an Oakland, California, mother of two...and Diane Monson filed a lawsuit to protect their access to [marijuana] after federal agents confiscated marijuana plants from Monson's yard."

"
"Supreme Court weighs marijuana as medicine." CNN.com. November 29, 2004. December 1, 2004. <http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/11/29/scotus.medical.marijuana.ap/>
"Their attorney, Randy Barnett of Boston, told the justices that his clients are law-abiding citizens who need marijuana to survive."
"Supreme Court weighs marijuana as medicine." CNN.com. November 29, 2004. December 1, 2004. <http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/11/29/scotus.medical.marijuana.ap/>
"A defeat for the two California women might undermine those laws and discourage other states from approving their own."

"A loss for the government, on the other hand, could jeopardize federal oversight of illegal drugs and raise questions in other areas such as product safety and environmental activities."
"Supreme Court weighs marijuana as medicine." CNN.com. November 29, 2004. December 1, 2004. <http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/11/29/scotus.medical.marijuana.ap/>
"federal prosecution of medical marijuana users is unconstitutional if the pot is not sold, transported across state lines or used for nonmedicinal purposes."
"Supreme Court weighs marijuana as medicine." CNN.com. November 29, 2004. December 1, 2004. <http://www.cnn.com/2004/LAW/11/29/scotus.medical.marijuana.ap/>