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25 Cards in this Set

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noun

: a person who hates or distrusts humankind
misanthrope
from Greek noun "anthrōpos," meaning "human being." and "misein," meaning "to hate."
verb

1 : to settle judicially
*2 : to act as judge
adjudicate
from the Latin verb "adjudicare," from "judicare," meaning "to judge," which, in turn, traces to the Latin noun "judex," meaning "judge." "judex" then comes from Latin "jus" meaning "law"
noun

: a level of poverty in which real hardship and deprivation are suffered and comforts of life are wholly lacking
indigence
descends from a Latin verb meaning "to need," implies seriously straitened circumstances and usually connotes the endurance of many hardships and the lack of comforts
verb

1 : to make the sliding dance step called chassé
2 a : walk, glide, go *b : to strut or move about in an ostentatious or conspicuous manner c : to proceed or move in a diagonal or sideways manner
sashay
French verb "chassé" ("to make a sliding dance step")
verb

*1 : to permeate or influence as if by dyeing
2 : to tinge or dye deeply
3 : to provide with something freely or naturally : endow
imbue
derives from the Latin verb "imbuere," meaning "to dye, wet, or moisten." closely synonymous with "imbrue" but not quite related
verb

1 a : to send forth new growth (as buds or branches) : sprout b : bloom
*2 : to grow and expand rapidly : flourish
burgeon
from the Middle English word "burjonen," which is from Anglo-French "burjuner"; both mean "to bud or sprout."
adjective

1 : selecting what appears to be best in various doctrines, methods, or styles
*2 : composed of elements drawn from various sources; also : heterogeneous
ecletic
comes from a Greek verb meaning "to select" and was originally applied to ancient philosophers who were not committed to any single system of philosophy; instead, these philosophers selected whichever doctrines pleased them from every school of thought
noun

1 : one that pioneers in or initiates a major change : precursor
*2 : one that presages or foreshadows what is to come
harbinger
used to mean "one who provides lodging" or "a host," but that meaning is now obsolete; late 1300s it was used for a person sent ahead of a main party to seek lodgings; derives from Anglo-French word "herberge," which meant "lodgings."
verb

1 : to instruct especially in fundamentals or rudiments : teach
*2 : to imbue with a usually partisan or sectarian opinion, point of view, or principle
indoctrinate
simply means "brainwash" to many people; 17th century it simply meant "to teach;" "doc" part of it comes from Latin verb "docēre," which also means "to teach."
adjective

: attempting to put into effect an abstract doctrine or theory with little or no regard for practical difficulties : dogmatic
doctrinaire
ultimately from Latin "doctrina," meaning "teaching" or "instruction."
adjective

: governed or characterized by sudden, impulsive, and seemingly unmotivated ideas or actions : unpredictable and spontaneous (produced freely)
capricious
derived via French from the Italian "capriccio," which originally referred not to a sudden desire, but to a sudden shudder of fear. "Capriccio" in turn derives from the Italian "capo," meaning "head," and "riccio," the word for "hedgehog."
noun

*1 : the state of being old : the process of becoming old
2 : the growth phase in a plant or plant part (as a leaf) from full maturity to death
senescence
derives (via the verb "senescere," meaning "to grow old") from the Latin "senex," meaning "old." related: "senile" and "senior" and "senate" and "senectitude" (similar to this words meaning)
adjective

*1 : relating to or based on the sense of touch
2 : characterized by a predilection for the sense of touch
haptic
from the Greek "haptesthai," meaning "to touch" and entered English in the late 19th century as a medical synonym for "tactile."
adjective

1 : having the wings extended as if in flight — used of a heraldic bird
*2 : flying or capable of flying
3 : quick, nimble
volant
like Spanish verb "voler" meaning "to fly." from the Latin verb "volare," meaning "to fly."
verb

: to unite in or as if in an amalgam; especially : to merge into a single body
amalgamate
derives by way of Middle French from Medieval Latin "amalgama."
adjective

*1 : absolute, unqualified
2 a : of, relating to, or constituting a category b : involving, according with, or considered with respect to specific categories
categorical
derive from Greek "katēgoria"
noun

*1 : any of several common-law writs issued to bring a party before a court or judge; especially : a writ for inquiring into the lawfulness of the restraint of a person who is imprisoned or detained in another's custody
2 : the right of a citizen to obtain a writ of habeas corpus as a protection against illegal imprisonment
heabeas corpus
"You should have the body." That's the literal meaning of the Latin
verb

: to have a paralyzing or mesmerizing effect on : stupefy, petrify
gorgonize
from the Greek adjective "gorgos," meaning "terrifying;" the Gorgons included their chief, Medusa, in Greek mythology. Today this refers to petrifying a person with an intimidating glance or gaze
adjective

1 : of, relating to, or characteristic of the ancient city of Byzantium or the Eastern Roman Empire
2 : of or relating to the Eastern Orthodox Church
*3 often not capitalized : intricately involved and often devious
Byzantine
from Late Latin "Byzantinus," for "native of Byzantium;" adjective came around in 1930s depicting the secrecy and despotism that went on in the Soviet Union like that of the Byzantine Empire
noun

: a usually small preliminary model (as of a sculpture or a building)
maquette
derived from the Italian noun "macchietta," meaning "sketch," and ultimately from the Latin "macula," meaning "spot." ryhmes with architects that often use them ;D
adjective

1 : born after the death of the father
*2 : published after the death of the author
3 : following or occurring after death
posthumous
In Latin, "posterus" is an adjective meaning "coming after" (from "post," meaning "after"); the "-umus" in the word was erroneously identified with "humus," meaning "earth" (as in the ground in which the unfortunate father now lay)
noun

: the returns arising from office or employment usually in the form of compensation or perquisites
emolument
Latin "emolumentum" had come to mean simply "profit" or "gain." It had thus become removed from its own Latin predecessor, the verb "molere," meaning "to grind."
noun

: the returns arising from office or employment usually in the form of compensation or perquisites
emolument
Latin "emolumentum" had come to mean simply "profit" or "gain." It had thus become removed from its own Latin predecessor, the verb "molere," meaning "to grind."
noun

: acute perception-acuteness of discernment or perception
persipacity
No hint
noun:

a brief scene from a movie or play
vignette
Mid-18th century. From French , literally “small vine” (from such decorations on the margins of pages in early books), from vigne (vine)