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25 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What is in lymph node medulla?
Reticular cells and plasma cells
What makes up the cortex?
Sinusoids
Lymphoid nodules (b cells)
paracortex(t cells)
How does blood enter lymph node?
High Endothelial venule
What makes spleen unique?
1 No afferent lymphatics or lymph sinuses present.
2 No cortex or medulla
3 Sophisticated vascular system
4 All the organ’s lymphoid tissue is found in the white pulp (i.e. lymphoid nodules of B cells
What is a primary lymph node?
unencapsulated inactive lymphnode nodule
What is a secondary lymph node?
unencapsulated active lymphnode nodule
Where is the lymph tissue of the spleen found?
The white pulp which is in the nodules and is B cells
Describe Adenoids (pharyngeal tonsils)?
Adenoids (pharyngeal tonsils)
1)Posterior wall of nasopharynx.
2. Covered with ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium -some portions may be stratified squamous epithelium (especially in older individuals).
Describe lingual tonsils?
Lingual: diffuse infiltration of lymphocytes or multiple small nodules below epithelium of the posterior third of the tongue.
What percent of tissues surrounding cells is lymph?
10%
Describe T cells?
T lymphocytes include several functionally distinct subtypes and are responsible for cell-mediated responses. They assist B cells in developing humeral responses to thymus-dependent antigens
Describe B cells?
B Lymphocytes develop into antibody-secreting plasma cells. Each plasma cell secretes only one class of immunoglobulin that binds only one antigen. These memory cells can react to the same antigen in subsequent encounters.
What is in the cortex of the thymus?
Cortex consists primarily of T cells, along with epithelial reticular cells (large pale cells “ERC”), macrophages and large lymphocytes.
What do cortical epithelial reticular cells do?
program which T cells will die and which ones will live and progress to the thymus medulla
What is the difference between the cortex and medulla of the thymus?
The medulla contains more epithelial reticular cells and fewer T lymphocytes than the cortex
What makes the thymus unique
1)Efferent lymphatics in the interlobular connective tissue drain the thymus.
2) No afferent lymphatics or lymph sinuses present.
3)No lymphatic nodules present.
4)Hassall corpuscles
What happens at the concave surface of the lymphnode?
Concave surface = contains arterioles and efferent lymphatic vessels
What makes up the cortex of the lymph node?
1. Sinusoids (endothelium-lined spaces create subcapsular sinuses)
2. Lymphoid nodules (B cells with some T cells & macrophages)
3. Paracortex (mostly T cell
What is in the medullar of the lymph node?
The lymph node medulla contains cords with reticular cells and plasma cells present; stains lighter than cortex
Artery passage through spleen?
Splenic artery enters at the hilum thru connective tissue trabeculae – once they enter the splenic pulp they become central arterioles where they are surrounded by lymphatic tissue
WHAT ARE PWP?
B cells
What makes spleen different?
1. No afferent lymphatics or lymph sinuses present.
2. No cortex or medulla
3. Sophisticated vascular system
4. All the organ’s lymphoid tissue is found in the white pulp (i.e. lymphoid nodules of B cells)
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