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12 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
WHAT IS LEAD?
L-LOCATE THE ISSUE
E-EVALUTE WHETER ACTION IS REQUIED
A-AUTHORITY
D-DETERMINE THE BEST COURSE OF ACTION
WHAT ARE THE FOUR POWER BASES?
EXPERT POWER
REFERENT POWER
LEGITIMATE POWER
COERCIVE POWER
WHAT IS AN Individual Development Plan (IDP)?
An IDP is a document used to track one's progress toward career, professional, and personal growth. It is a tool for recording development goals, plans for taking advantage of developmental opportunities, and the outcomes of investing in those activities.
WHAT IS MENORING?
A mentor is a person who cares about people and goes out of the way to see subordinates get the best possible chance to fulfill career potential. A protégé is a subordinate who is being
groomed for advancement by being provided opportunities to excel beyond the limits of his or her current position. Mentoring is a process where the mentor and the protégé work together to discover and develop the protégé’s abilities. Mentoring is an integral aspect of
leadership. Mentors are helpers whose styles range from the persistent encourager who helps
build self-confidence, to the stern taskmaster who teaches protégés to appreciate excellence in performance.
WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF MENORING?
FORMAL-is more structured and will occur more often within the Navy environment based on departmental, divisional, or work center responsibilities.

INFORMAL-mentoring is spontaneous and unplanned
WHAT IS SITUATIONAL MENTORING?
It is usually short term, addressing an immediate situation, but can
transition to a more long-term connection.
WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF MOTIVATION?
-Intrinsic motivation is the inner desire to engage one’s interests and exercise one’s
capabilities. Intrinsic motivation provides a natural force that encourages selfdevelopment and personal growth.

-Extrinsic motivation occurs when external rewards direct behaviors into specific patterns. The directed behavior is due to external motivators, not intrinsic-need satisfaction.Individuals act in certain ways as a means of getting something else.
WHAT ARE SOME OF THE THINGS YOU WILL FIND ON YOUR ELECTRONIC CAREER INFORMATION?
-Performance Summary Record
-Enlisted Summary Record
-Electronic Training Jacket
WHAT DO YOU FIND ON THE EDVR AND WHAT DO THEY MEAN FOR THE COMMAND?
BA – Billets Authorized. This is the ideal number of Sailors in each rating and paygrade needed by each command to accomplish its mission. It represents 100 percent manning.

EAOS – Expiration of Active Obligated Service. This is the date on which you separate from active duty. It does not generate a requisition for your replacement. If at the last minute you decide to re-enlist, a Plan Rotation Date (PRD) will be established and a Requisition (REQ) will
be generated for nine months in the future.

MAT – Minimum Activity Tour. This is the minimum tour length you have to complete before you can be transferred. Most commands have a 24-month minimum activity tour. This ensures
command stability.

MCA – Manning Control Authority. The four MCAs (BUPERS, COMLANTFLT,
COMPACFLT, COMNAVRESFOR) exercise responsibility for manning all the Navy's enlisted billets. The MCAs decide the priority assigned to billets on the REQs.

MST – Maximum Sea Tour. This is the maximum amount of time you should expect to serve
in a sea-going command.

NMP – Navy Manning Plan. This gives each command its fair share of the number of
personnel available. NMP may be larger, smaller, or equal to BA. NMP is computed for the
Manning Control Authorities (MCA) by EPMAC which compares each command's BA with
projections of Sailors due for transfer nine months in the future.

PRD – Projected Rotation Date. This is the month and year in which you should expect to transfer. It is also used in the REQ to determine when your relief is due. The REQ for your
relief will show up in the detailer's office nine months before your PRD.

REQ – The Requisition. This is a computerized listing of billets requiring relief. It's prepared
by Enlisted Placement Management Center (EPMAC). Billets are listed by command, paygrade,
rating, and NEC, in the MCA order of priority. This is the order the detailer must follow to fill
them.
WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PLANNING?
-Short-range planning sets out the short-range goals or objectives to support a command mission or objective. Also called action plans, these plans take established end states, make them more specific, and outline the implementation steps. It is planning designed to maximize the efficiencies involved in day-to-day operations. They support mid-range and long-range plans. Short-range planning usually involves objectives handed down by
a higher level in the organization and determines ways to attain them.

-Mid-range planning involves the near-term goals and objectives that support an
organization’s long-range plans. This type of planning includes monthly and quarterly
training plans, quarterly budget plans, and Plan of Action & Milestones (POA&Ms).

-Long-range plans focus on how an organization decides where it is going. These types of plans are developed by the top management of an organization and are broadest in scope. They include top-down planning, a long-range timeframe, and an external focus. Longrange plans are not constrained by time and are cyclical and continuous.
Decision-Making Styles
-Authoritative decision-making applies in situations where the LPO has the necessary experience and information to make the decision and followers do not possess the ability, willingness, or confidence to help. The LPO makes the decision and followers
are usually not actively involved in determining the course of action. In fact, they usually do not hear about the decision until it is announced. Authoritative decisions commonly communicated with phrases such as, “I’ve decided that…” and “Here is what we are going to do.”

-Consultative style of decision-making, the LPO seeks Sailors who can help and
asks for their assistance in making the decision. Help is solicited by using phrases such as, “What do you know about…” and “I would like some information on….” The LPO
may or may not share all aspects of the problem. After receiving input from Sailors,
the LPO makes the final decision. Whenever you bring others into the decision-making process, you must make the ground rules very clear. A consultative decision is still leader-made. To avoid
misunderstandings, Sailors must be told what you need. As the leader you will weigh
their inputs carefully, but may not follow their advice in reaching the final decision.

-Facilitative decision-making is a cooperative effort where the LPO and followers work
together to achieve a shared decision. The LPO enlists Sailors’ help using phrases such as, “Let’s pool our thoughts and decide on…” or “We have a problem and I’d like your
opinion.” The implication is the Sailors are capable of sharing the authority to decide
what should be done.
d. Delegative
Delegative decision-making is used when the LPO delegates to Sailors. It is used when
Sailors have the experience needed to make the proper decision or recommendation.
When delegative decision-making is appropriate, the LPO can expect a high level of
performance by using a phrase such as, “You know this subject/issue; work on it and let me know what you come up with.” (Hersey, 1996, p.483-445
Group Decision-Making Styles
Individual/Authority
The decision is made by an individual who assumes authority. It is often easier for a team to accept because the team does not have to “buy into” the decision. Someone else is responsible, so it is “their” decision, not “ours.”

Minority/Coalition
The decision is made by two or more team members talking off-line or simultaneously
due to command backgrounds, duties, interests, etc. It often happens suddenly and
catches other team members off guard and unprepared. If the other team members are
intimidated by the coalition or uncommitted to the process, they may accept a suboptimal
decision rather than force consideration of their viewpoints. Minority/coalition
decisions generate resistance, or at best, apathy.

Majority
This is a traditional response, when opposing views appear deadlocked. Those in the minority remain opposed. They do not buy into and may create roadblocks to
implementation or may try to get even.

Consensus
This is the optimal method and most informed type of team decision-making. It has a
high probability that decision will actually get implemented. Everyone understands and
supports reasons for making the decision, even though it may not be their choice. It
represents a choice everyone can live with. The two most common methods of reaching
consensus are focusing down and opening up.
• Focusing down
Focusing down attempts to find the “common” ground among all the participants.
This is the typical “seeking the common denominator” when there are multiple
individual views. Consensus is built from the part of each individuals’ view that
is shared by the other members of the group. That common ground establishes a
base view all agree on and can be built on to reach the final decision.
• Opening up
Opening up seeks a perspective larger than any single person’s view. Each
person’s view is a unique perspective on a larger reality. By sharing others’
perspectives through dialogue, we may all see something we would not have seen
alone and reach a consensus decision that may be different from any of the
individual views.