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"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
Democrats who claim Bolton is too hotheaded or unbending say they could try to hold up a final vote in the full Senate.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee held private interviews with two State Department officials who worked with Bolton in his current job as the department's arms control chief.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
The Democrat who is leading the opposition to Bolton said he is asking the nominee directly for additional information.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
Republicans claimed to have the support in the Senate committee needed to confirm Bolton.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
Democrats acknowledged as much, saying they probably could not stop Bolton at the committee's scheduled meeting Thursday.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
The committee planned a lengthy debate, largely on the Democrats' accounting of three weeks of inquiry into Bolton's conduct and fitness for the job.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
All eight Democrats on the 18-member GOP-led committee oppose Bolton.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
For weeks, they have tried to raise enough questions about Bolton's conduct and temperament to persuade at least one Republican committee member to defect.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
"Democrats continue to feel that Mr. Bolton is the wrong person for the job," said Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
A 10-8 party-line vote would send Bolton's nomination on to the full Senate, where Republicans have a larger majority. A tie would be the same as a no vote.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
The committee's ranking Democrat, Sen. Joseph Biden Jr. of Delaware, and Sen. Christopher Dodd of Connecticut said it is possible Bolton's nomination could be blocked by a Democratic filibuster in the full Senate.
"It is not my intention to do that, but it depends on how this plays out," Biden said. Added Dodd: "It's certainly a real possibility."
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
Among four committee Republicans who have expressed reservations about Bolton, only Sen. George Voinovich of Ohio appeared to remain on the fence.

"At this stage of the game we're going to make that decision tomorrow," Voinovich said.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
The committee put off a scheduled vote on Bolton's nomination last month after Voinovich joined Democrats in asking for more time to investigate fresh allegations about the Bolton's conduct.
"Bolton Probe Continues on Eve of Vote." Cnn.com. May 12, 2005. May 12, 2005. <http://www.cnn.com/2005/POLITICS/05/11/bolton.vote.ap/index.html>.
JOHN R. BOLTON
AGE: 56; born November 20, 1948, in Baltimore, Maryland
EDUCATION: Bachelor's degree from Yale University, summa cum laude, 1970; law degree from Yale Law School, 1974
EXPERIENCE: Undersecretary of state for arms control and international security since May 11, 2001; assistant U.S. attorney general, 1985-1989; assistant administrator for program and policy coordination, U.S. Agency for International Development, 1982-1983; general counsel, U.S. Agency for International Development, 1981-1982; associate at the Washington office of Covington & Burling, 1974-81; partner in the law firm of Lerner, Reed, Bolton & McManus, 1993-99
FAMILY: Married to the former Gretchen Brainerd; one daughter.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The U.S. television industry unveiled a voluntary TV ratings system on Thursday aimed at allowing viewers to decide which programs are suitable for children. All programs, except news and sports, will be included.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
The system is to begin early next year and will be similar to the ratings that have been used on movies for nearly 30 years. It is the first time the industry has ever adopted a rating system.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
In announcing the plan, Jack Valenti, president of the Motion Picture Association of America and head of the TV industry's ratings effort said, "Never before has this disparate (industry) ever come together in near unanimity to present to the American public something they are doing voluntarily."
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
"There is no law that commands us to do what we are unveiling today," he said.
Valenti said producers, broadcast networks, cable channels, syndicates and others that originate programs will rate their own shows for sexual and violent content.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
He also praised Decker Anstrom, president of the National Cable Television Association, and Edward Fritts, president of the National Association of Broadcasters, for their work in developing the system. Anstrom and Fritts were on hand for the announcement.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
President Clinton applauded the ratings plan but stopped short of an outright endorsement.

"This is a huge step forward over what we have now, which is nothing," Clinton said. "We might be able to make it better. The parents groups, the advocacy groups deserve to be heard and considered. But we are now doing what I think ought to be done."
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
But critics of the plan want shows to be independently rated.
In an afternoon news conference, advocacy groups -- including the Center for Media Education, the National Parent Teacher Association, the Children's Defense Fund and the American Psychological Association -- denounced the ratings system, saying it needs to be more specific about the amount and type of sex, violence and strong language used in a show.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
Feig added that the industry should test an independent ratings system developed by the nation's parents, "not Jack Valenti."
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
Valenti said the system gives parents adequate information to make judgments about what their children will watch, while being simple enough for newspapers to publish the ratings before the programs are shown.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
Ratings can be appealed to a 19-member board of TV industry representatives. Also, the industry's ratings system is subject to Federal Communications Commission approval. If the FCC finds the system unsuitable, it can move to appoint an independent advisory board to rate programs. However, the government cannot require its use.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
TV-Y, material suitable for children of all ages. Show contains little or no violence, strong language or sexual content.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
TV-Y7, material suitable for children 7 and older
TV-G, material suitable for all audiences.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
TV-PG, parental guidance is suggested. Program may contain infrequent coarse language, limited violence, some suggestive sexual dialogue and situations.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
TV-14, material may be inappropriate for children under 14. Program may contain sophisticated themes, strong language and sexual content.
"U.S. TV industry unveils ratings system." CNN.com, May 13, 2005. December 19, 1996. <http://www.cnn.com/US/9612/19/tv.ratings.update/index.html>.
TV-M, for mature audiences only. Program may contain profane language, graphic violence and explicit sexual content.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tennessee, intends this week to call up for a vote the first of the blocked nominees -- Texas judge Priscilla Owen and California judge Janice Rogers Brown. Bush nominated both for federal judgeships during his first term, but they and five others were blocked by Democrats.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Should Democrats move this week to block either Brown or Owen, and Republicans fail to break the filibuster, Frist then would call for the Senate to vote on whether to ban use of filibusters against judicial nominees.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Although both sides said they had the votes to prevail, they acknowledged that several middle-of-the-road Republicans had yet to say publicly how they would vote.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
I haven't given up on the possibility that we might have 60 votes, including some Democrats who've been whispering in our ears that they believe that this ought to be defused," Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, the chief GOP vote counter, said on "Fox News Sunday."
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Republicans hold 55 seats in the 100-member Senate. Democrats have 44, plus one Democrat-leaning independent.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Frist needs a minimum of 50 votes to abolish judicial filibusters. Vice President Dick Cheney would provide the tie-breaking vote in his constitutional role as president of the Senate.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the Democrats' vote counter, said his party was united. He said he also expected to pick up GOP support from some of those who have yet to signal how they would vote.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
"We feel that there are at least four Republican senators who feel as we do and we feel that there are several who are making up their minds at the last moment," Durbin said.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
"I believe that, as reasonable people, as we have in the past in the Senate, we should sit down together and work this out," Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, who has broken with his party on the issue, told ABC's "This Week."
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
But Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Massachusetts, said on CBS' "Face the Nation" that Democrats "should not accept a compromise that's going to silence and muzzle and gag a member of the United States Senate to express their conscience on an issue of a lifetime judge."
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Democrats filibustered 10 nominees to the U.S. appeals courts during Bush's first term, and they have said they will do so again this year for the seven that Bush renominated.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada also said Democrats might filibuster future nominees, possibly including Bush's choice for a Supreme Court vacancy should one occur.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
The filibuster is a parliamentary tactic where senators use their right to virtually unlimited debate to block measures or legislation. To stop a filibuster requires 60 votes. Passing a bill or confirming a nominee requires only a simple majority, 51 senators if all 100 senators are present. The vice president can break 50-50 ties.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Use of the term filibuster began to appear in the 1840s. It is derived from the Dutch word vrijbuiter, or free booter, and the Spanish filibustero. Both terms refer to pirates. The filibuster was used in the 1950s and 1960s to impede civil rights legislation. In 1957 Strom Thurmond launched the longest one-man filibuster in history, speaking for more than 24 hours to block the Civil Rights Act of 1957.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Q: Who are the judicial nominees involved in the filibuster controversy?

A: David McKeague, Richard Griffin, Henry Saad, William G. Myers III, Janice Rogers Brown, William H. Pryor Jr. and Priscilla Owen.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tennessee, intends this week to call up for a vote the first of the blocked nominees -- Texas judge Priscilla Owen and California judge Janice Rogers Brown. Bush nominated both for federal judgeships during his first term, but they and five others were blocked by Democrats.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Should Democrats move this week to block either Brown or Owen, and Republicans fail to break the filibuster, Frist then would call for the Senate to vote on whether to ban use of filibusters against judicial nominees.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Although both sides said they had the votes to prevail, they acknowledged that several middle-of-the-road Republicans had yet to say publicly how they would vote.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
I haven't given up on the possibility that we might have 60 votes, including some Democrats who've been whispering in our ears that they believe that this ought to be defused," Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, the chief GOP vote counter, said on "Fox News Sunday."
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Republicans hold 55 seats in the 100-member Senate. Democrats have 44, plus one Democrat-leaning independent.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Frist needs a minimum of 50 votes to abolish judicial filibusters. Vice President Dick Cheney would provide the tie-breaking vote in his constitutional role as president of the Senate.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the Democrats' vote counter, said his party was united. He said he also expected to pick up GOP support from some of those who have yet to signal how they would vote.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
"We feel that there are at least four Republican senators who feel as we do and we feel that there are several who are making up their minds at the last moment," Durbin said.
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
"I believe that, as reasonable people, as we have in the past in the Senate, we should sit down together and work this out," Sen. John McCain, R-Arizona, who has broken with his party on the issue, told ABC's "This Week."
"Both sides claim enough support in filibuster fight." CNN.com, May 16, 2005. May 16, 2005.
But Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Massachusetts, said on CBS' "Face the Nation" that Democrats "should not accept a compromise that's going to silence and muzzle and gag a member of the United States Senate to express their conscience on an issue of a lifetime judge."
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Democrats filibustered 10 nominees to the U.S. appeals courts during Bush's first term, and they have said they will do so again this year for the seven that Bush renominated.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Senate Democratic leader Harry Reid of Nevada also said Democrats might filibuster future nominees, possibly including Bush's choice for a Supreme Court vacancy should one occur.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
The filibuster is a parliamentary tactic where senators use their right to virtually unlimited debate to block measures or legislation. To stop a filibuster requires 60 votes. Passing a bill or confirming a nominee requires only a simple majority, 51 senators if all 100 senators are present. The vice president can break 50-50 ties.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Use of the term filibuster began to appear in the 1840s. It is derived from the Dutch word vrijbuiter, or free booter, and the Spanish filibustero. Both terms refer to pirates. The filibuster was used in the 1950s and 1960s to impede civil rights legislation. In 1957 Strom Thurmond launched the longest one-man filibuster in history, speaking for more than 24 hours to block the Civil Rights Act of 1957.
"What's behind the Senate dispute over judicial filibuster." CNN.com. May 4, 2005. May 14, 2005.
Q: Who are the judicial nominees involved in the filibuster controversy?

A: David McKeague, Richard Griffin, Henry Saad, William G. Myers III, Janice Rogers Brown, William H. Pryor Jr. and Priscilla Owen.