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76 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
alliteration
Repetition of the beginning consonant sound
allusion
Reference to something outside of the work, usually mythical
antagonist
the person or thing that opposes the protagonist
archetype
a recurring an familiar pattern in literature, like a journey or a wise old man
aside
when a character in a play speaks to the audience and not to the other characters
assonance
repetition of an internal vowel sound, ex. "how now brown cow"
autobiography
a story about a person written by that person
ballad
poem which tells a story of a person from the past and is often set to music
biography
an author's account or story of another person's life
climax
high point in a story, point of most intense interest
denotation
the literal, dictionary definition of a word
dialogue
conversation carried on by the characters in a work of literature
dramatic POV
a play, in which all events are told as dialogue
end rhyme
rhyming words that appear at the ends of two or more lines of poetry
epic poetry
a long narrative poem about the adventures of an almost superhuman character
epithet
a word or phrase used in place of a person's name to help characterize the person
exposition
the part of a story or play that explains the background or makes conflict clear
falling action
the action that takes place in a story after the climax and that resolves the conflict
fantasy
highly imaginative writing that contains elements not found in real life
fiction
prose writing that tells about imaginary characters and events
figurative language
writing or speech not meant to be interpreted literally, similes, metaphors, and personification are examples
characterization
the way an author reveals his characters. can be done directly or indirectly
first person point of view
told from the perspective of one character in the story. designated by the pronoun 'I'
flashback
when a story's sequence is interrupted and a character goes back to an earlier time
foreshadowing
the use of clues that suggest events yet to come
free verse
poetry that is not written with a regular pattern of rhythm and rhyme
hero
a character whose actions are inspiring or noble, and who overcomes difficulties
hyperbole
exaggerating or stretching the truth for literary effect. "My shoes are killing me!"
imagery
words that describe sights, sounds, movements and recreate sensory experience
lyric poetry
poetry that expresses the observations and feelings of a single speaker
metaphor
comparison of two unlike things without using "like" or "as"
meter
the repetition of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry
monologue
a speech or performance given entirely by one person or one character
myth
a fictional tale that explains the actions of gods or heroes, or the causes of natural phenomenon, or both.
narrative poetry
poems that tell a story
omniscient point of view
when the story is told from the perspective of someone outside of the events but who knows and reveals all the character's thoughts and feelings
onomatopoeia
the use of words that imitate sounds, as in buzz, hiss, or murmur
oxymoron
two words used together that contradict each other, as in icy fire or sweet sorrow
paradox
a statement that seems to be contradictory but that actually presents a truth
personification
giving human characteristics to a non-human thing or substance
plot
the sequence of events in a literary work
point of view
the perspective from which a story is told. types are 1st person, 3rd person limited, omniscient, stream of consciousness, and dramatic
poetic justice
when a character "gets what he deserves"
prologue
the opening lines of a drama that give background information
prose
the ordinary form of written language, not poetry, drama, or song
protagonist
the main character in a literary work who drives the plot forward
pseudonym
the assumed or false name of an author. Samuel Clemens' pseudonym is Mark Twain
pun
a play on words when a word has more than one meaning
refrain
the regularly repeated group of lines in a poem or song
rhyme
repetition of sounds at the end of words
science fiction
fictional stories that center upon scientific elements
setting
time and place of a literary work
soliloquy
speech delivered by a character when he is alone on stage
sonnet
fourteen lines of iambic pentameter- a very common form of poetry
stanza
a unit or group of lines in poetry that are separated by spaces
style
an author's unique way of writing that involves word choice and sentence patterns
symbol
something seen that stands for something unseen, as a rose for love, flag for country
theme
central truth or idea in a story
third person point of view
when the story is told from the perspective of some one outside of the events of the story but who reveals only one character's thoughts
tone
the writer or speaker's attitude towards the subject of the work
conflict
the problem or complication in a story, usually between a person and something else...either another person, a force of nature, fate, or the person himself
connotation
all the emotions or feelings a word arouses, such as negative feelings about 'pig'
haiku
a Japanese form of poetry with three lines of 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables
historical fiction
stories that center upon or incorporate some significant historical events
iambic pentameter
a metrical pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables common in poetry and in Shakespearean plays. Th line contains ten syllables in the pattern
~/~/~/~/~/.
genre
a French word meaning form or type. Literary genres are novel, essay, poetry, play
cliche
a word or phrase that is overused
mystery
a story that involves the reader in guessing who committed the crime or deed
non-fiction
prose that explains ideas or is about real people, places, objects, or events
parallelism
repetition of phrases that have similar grammatical patterns
simile
a comparison of two unlike things using the word "like" or "as". love is like a rose
stream of consciousness
a narrative technique, or point of view, that presents thoughts as if they were coming straight form a character's mind, with story events and character feelings combined
tragedy
a type of story that portrays the fall of a noble person, usually due to a tragic weakness
anecdote
short summary of a funny event
irony
when something is different than it is supposed to be or thought to be. includes verbal, dramatic, and situational
second person
designated by the pronoun 'you'. there is none of this in storytelling