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40 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
  • 3rd side (hint)
epic
a quest story on a grand scale
paraphrase
put into your own words
explicate
explain
tragic hero
Aristotle's idea of a good, even great person who brings his own destruction through a flaw in his character
tragic scene of recognition
Aristotle's concept: the hero comes to understand something the audience has long understood
blank verse
unrhymed iambic pentameter
(a form of poetry that comes close to imitating the natural rhythms of Enlish speech)
(pg. 318)
iambic
a metrical foot that has one unstressed syllable followed by one stressed syllable.
(pg. 318)
pentameter
each line of verse has five feet, so one line of iambic pentameter has five iambs
(pg. 318)
soliloquy
a meditative kind of speech in which a character, usually alone on stage and pretending that the audience is not present, thinks out loud
(pg. 383)
aside
lines unheard by the other characters on stage, esp. in Shakespeare
tragic reversal
Aristotle's concept in which the effect gained is the opposite of the effect intended
exposition
the introduction
denouement
the falling action (Act IV in a Shakespearean play)
resolution
conclusion
protagonist
the main character in a fiction, drama, or narrative poetry. Most protagonists are rounded, dynamic characters who change in some important way by end of the story.
(p. 1195)
climax
the point of the greatest emotional intensity or suspence in a plot. (usually where the conflict is decided)
(pg. 1191)
antagonist
the character or force that opposes or blocks the protagonist, or main character, in a narrative
(p. 1189)
comic relief
a comic scene coming before or after a scene of high dramatic tension to relieve the emotions of the audience
foil
a character who sets off another character by strong contrast
(p. 1195)
motif
In literature, a word, character, object, image, metaphor, or idea that recurs in a work or in several works.
(p. 1197)
tone
The attitude a writer takes toward the reader, a subject, or a character.
p. 1203
verbal irony
occurs when a writer or speaker says one thing but really means something quite different-often the opposite of what he or she said
("oh, i just love waiting in the rain")
p. 1196
situational irony
occurs when what actually happens is the opposite of what is expected or appropriate
(expect palace, when u get there it is a dump)
p. 1196
satire
A kind of writing that ridicules human weakness, vice, or folly in order to bring about social reform
p. 1201
ballad
a song or songlike poem that tells a story; most have a regular pattern of rhythm and rhyme, and generally have a refrain
p. 1190
caesura
a pause or break within a line of poetry, usually indicated by the natural rhythm of the language
p. 1190
foreshadowing
the use of clues to hint at what is going to happen later in the plot; builds suspense
p. 1195
persona
the "I" or first person narrator that is not necessarily the author
kenning
In Anglo-Saxon poetry, a metaphorical phrase or compound word used to name a person, place, thing, or event indirectly
p. 1196
allegory
a story in which the characters, settings, and events stand for abstract or moral concepts
p. 1189
alliteration
repetition of consonant sounds in non-rhythming words, especially at the beginning of words duch as "rough" and
"ready."
p. 1189
consonance
The repetition of final consonant sounds in non-rhythming words (i.e. "struts" and "frets");
can also mean repetition of consonant sounds in the middle of words such as in "solemn stillness."
p. 1192
assonance
the repetition of similar vowel sounds followed by different consonant sounds in words that are close together. Assonance differs from exact rhyme because it doesn't repeat the consonant sound following the vowel.
(i.e. face and fade, NOT face and base)
p. 1190
oxymoron
a figure of speech that combines apparently contradictory or incongruous ideas
p. 1198
sonnet
a fourteen-line lyric poem, usually written in iambic pentameter, that has one of several rhyme schemes
(two types: Italian, Patrarchan)
p. 1201
quatrain
a four-line stanza or poem or a group of four lines unified by a rhyme scheme.
(most common verse in Eng. poetry)
p. 1200
couplet
two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme.
p. 1192
octave
an eight-line stanza or poem or the first eight lines of an Italian, or Petrarchan, sonnet
(rhyme scheme abbaabba)
p. 1198
sestet
a six-line stanza or poem or the last six lines of an Italian, or Petrarchan, sonnet
(rhyme scheme cdcdcd)
p. 1201
conceit
a fanciful and elaborate figure or speech that makes a surprising connection between two seemingly dissimilar things
p. 1192