Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/33

Click to flip

33 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
a tale in prose or verse in which characters, actions, or settings represent abstract ideas or moral qualitles.
allegory.
the repetition of initial consonant sounds in words.
alliteration.
a refrence to a person, a place, an event, or a literary work that a writer expects a reader to recognize.
allusion.
a poetic foot consisting of two unstressed syllables followed by a stressed syllable.
anapest.
a terse, pointed statement expressing some wise or clever ovbservation about life.
aphorism.
a figure of speech in which an absent or dead person, an abstract quality, or something inanimate or nonhuman is addressed directly.
apostrophe.
in drama, a short speech spoken by a character in an undertone or directly to the audience.
aside.
the repetition of vowel sounds, especially in poetry.
assonance.
a story told in verse and usually meant to be sung.
ballad.
verse written in unrhymed iambic pentameter.
blank verse.
a break or pause in a line of poetry, which contributes to the rhythm of the poem.
caesura.
a movement or tendency in art, literature, and music reflecting the principles manifested in the art of ancient greece and rome.
classicism.
the decisive point in a narrative or drama; the point of greatest intensity or interest.
climax.
a kind of metaphor that makes a comparsion between two startlingly different things.
conceit.
poetry that uses the appearence of the verse lines on the page to suggest or imitate the poem's subject.
concrete poem.
poetry that makes frank, explicit use of incidents in the poet's life.
confessional poetry.
a struggle between two opposing forces or characters in a short story.
conflict.
the repetition of similar consonant sounds within a group of words.
consonance.
two consecutive lines of poetry that rhyme.
couplet.
a poetic foot consisting of a stressed syllable followed by two unstressed syllables.
dactyle.
the outcome of a plot.
denouement.
the characteristic speech of a particular region or social group.
dialect.
a writer's choice of words, particularly for clarity, effectiveness, and precision.
diction.
a narrative poem in which one character speaks to one or more listeners whose replies are not given in the poem.
dramatic monologue.
a poem of mourning, usually over the death of an individual.
elegy.
a long narrative poem describing the deeds of a great hero and reflecting the values of the culture from which it originated.
epic.
a short, witty statement in prose or verse.
epigram.
a quotation or motto at the beginning of a chapter, book, short story, or poem that makes some point about the work.
epigraph.
an inscription on a gravestone or a short poem written in memory of someone who has died.
epitaph.
a descriptive name of phrase used to chacterize someone or something such as "fair-weather friend" or "catherine the great."
epithet.
a prose work, usually short, that deals with a subject in a limited way and expresses a particular point of view.
essay.
a person or force opposing the protagonist in a drama or a narrative.
antagonist.
a comparsion made between two things to show the similarties between them.
analogy.