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47 Cards in this Set

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Satire
Writing that makes fun of habits, ideas or weaknesses in a person, institution, society, or humanity in general.
Parody
Writing that makes fun of a genre of literature, art, or music.
Farce
Writing that features slapstick, far-fetched, and ridiculous humor that may include physical comedy, practical jokes, exaggeration, and absurdity.
Rhetorical Question
A question that does not require an answer.
Onomatopoeia
A Word whose sound suggests its meaning.
Parallelism
The Repetition of words, phrases, or sentences to add rhythm and emotion to writing.
Assonance
Repetition of vowel sounds at the beginning, middle, or end of a word.
Irony
a contradictory statement or situation
Repetition
Words or phrases repeated in writings to produce emphasis, rhythm, and/or a sense of urgency
Metaphor
Comparison which does not use "like" or "as"
Refrain
The repetition of a word, phrase, line, or lines in a poem, song, or speech at regular intervals. They often appear at the end of stanzas.
Suspense
a growing sense of tension or anxiety about what will happen next in the story
Form
The Structure or shape of a written work which may or may not follow strict rules.
Symbol
Something concrete that stands for something abstract. A symbol may be a person, place, or thing, or action. It may stand for an idea, belief, feeling, or attitude.
Alliteration
The repetition of beginning consonant sounds anywhere in a word or group of words.
Conflict
A struggle between two opposing forces.
Hyperbole
Obvious exaggeration used to emphasize a point or add excitement and humor to a story.
Flashback
an interruption in a story to tell about events that happened earlier
Moral
The lesson expressed in a simple story. Fables and Parables are specifically designed to teach a moral.
Dialect
An author's use of speech patterns that give hints about a character's regional, educational, social, economic and historical background.
Idiom
an expression that means something different from what it says...I'd like a square meal
Theme
Indirectly expressed insights.
Rhyme
The repetition of end sounds in words.
If you're dancing with your honey ,
And your nose is cold and runny,
You may think it's funny...
Rhyme
Rhythm
The pattern of beats or stresses in a language.
Romanticism
Nature is a beautiful, mysterious, living being
1800-1900
An apt parrot automatically answers with radically accented swaggers.
Assonance
Run On line
Lines of poetry that continue in meaning and punctuation into the next line to vary the rhythm of a poem.
End-Stopped Line
The end of a line of poetry coincides with the end of a thought.
His nose was as big as a turnip.
Simile
Deism
This religion says that god created the universe to run by laws so perfect that he need not interve in it anymore -
an attempt to explain spiritual matters entirely by human reasoning or natural laws
Stanza
A division in poetry that is equivalent to a paragraph in prose.
Alas! And did my savior bleed, and did my sov'reign die?
Scansion
Form
The structure or shape of a written work which may or may not follow strict rules.
Crash, Bang, Smash, aarrgg!
Onomatopoeia
Scansion
Marking the pattern of beats or stresses in a poem.
Unitarianism
all roads lead to God - god is a generic one, not a trinity, no need for a Savior, Son, or Spirit to meddle with our hearts...man is basically good.
Simile
Comparison which uses like or as.
Consonance
Repetition of consonant sounds anywhere in a word or group of words.
Utilitarianism
People are only as valuable as they are useful to society - God doesn't enter into it
Industrial Revolution
This movement emphasized the supremacy of human reason, science, and natural law
Enlightenment
1700-1800
Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers
Alliteration
Hope put soap in a cantaloupe and fed the goat a broken loaf
Assonance
Steven says that asters have the biggest stamens and roses have the biggest pistils
Consonance
Grendel howled and growled and groaned and moaned
Onomatopoeia
I tell you, the mosquito was as big as a blue jay!
Hyperbole