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10 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Regeneration
The reparative process by which injuried or dead cells are replaced by replicating cells of the same type
Repair
The process by which damaged or dead tissue is replaced by normal tissue
Fibrosis
Replacement of a defect (abscess or necrosis) in tissue with a fibrous connective tissue (scar)
Scar
Fibrous tissue used to replace defective tissue
Angiogenesis
Formation of new blood vessels which is the first step in tissue repair
Neovascularization

Compare to angiogenesis:
Neovascularization is defined as the formation of functional microvascular networks with red blood cell perfusion.

Neovascularization differs from angiogenesis in that angiogenesis is mainly characterized by the protrusion and outgrowth of capillary buds and sprouts from pre-existing blood vessels.
Granulation tissue
Specialized tissue that fills in defects within organs when non-regenerative cells and/or connective tissue framework is destroyed in a disease process.
Organization
The process of transforming granulation tissue into a dense scar. Granulation tissue, with time, changes as the connective tissue elements, such as collagen, mature and blood vessels become less prominent.
Keloid
Excessive scar formation occuring when a signal from macrophages to stop fibrosis does not occur.
Contraction
The wound is made smaller by the action of myofibroblasts, which establish a grip on the wound edges and contract themselves using a mechanism similar to that in smooth muscle cells