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10 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
place of articulation (of a sound)
where in the vocal tract a constriction is made
Bilabial
consonants are made by bringing both lips closer together

Five sounds in English: [p] pat, [b] bat, m [mat], [w] with, [w] which
Labiodental
consonants made with the lower lip against the upper front teeth

English has two: [f] fat and [v] vat
Interdentals
Made with tip of tongue protruding between front teeth

Two sounds in American English: [θ] thigh and [ð] thy
Alveolar
sounds made with tongue tip at or near the albeolar ride

English has 7 alveolar consonants: [t] tab, [d] dab, [s] sip, [z] zip, [n] noose, [l] loose, [ɹ] red
Palatal
sounds are made a bit furher back in the mouth - tongue near the hard part of the roof of the mouth "hard palate"

English has five sounds: [ʃ] leash, [ʒ] measure, [tʃ] church, [dʒ] judge, [j] yes
Velar
produced at the soft part of the roof of the mouth behind the hard palate - the velum

Sounds [k] kill, [g] gill, [ŋ] sing
Glottal
sounds produced in larynx - space between vocal folds is glottis

English has two: [h] high and history, [ʔ] uh-oh
Fricatives
made by forming a nearly complete obstruction of vocal tract, resulting in a turbulent noise

[f], [v], [ʃ], [s], [z], [θ], [ʒ], [ð]
Affricates
made by briefly stopping airstream completely and then releasing the articulators slightly so that frication is produced

English has two: [tʃ] as in church and [dʒ] as in judge