• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/10

Click to flip

10 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
Borrowing
" English borrows often directly from other languages, though it
probably happens more the other way around.
" Often cultural objects or concepts that are borrowed.
" Sometimes some adaptation of sounds to native phonology.
" Often the borrowed word is used with native affixes – good
indication that the word has been fully incorporated.
Literal translation
" Less frequent.
" Often harder to spot if you were not there when it happened.
German: Übermensch ! English: superman
French: gratte-ciel ! English: skyscraper
Blending
" Combine parts of existing words
brunch
motel
More examples?
Clipping
" Using only part of word
my ex = my ex-husband
mic = microphone
US = USA
stats = statistics
More examples?
Acronyms
" Using the first few sounds of every word
radar = Radio Detecting and Ranging
NASA = National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Abbreviations
" Using the first letter of every word
USA = United States of America
UBC = University of British Columbia
DRC = Democratic Republic of the Congo
OD = overdose
CD = compact disc
Compounding
" Putting together two roots to form new word
" Very productive – new words are often formed this way
" Meaning of compound can often not be determined from the
meaning of its component parts
baby-sit
cranberry
horseradish
watermelon
textbook
Functional shift
" Changing the part of speech of a word without using a
derivational affix
N ! V: hammer
V ! N: count
N ! V: book
N ! V: microwave
N ! V: Google
More examples?
New names
" Brand names for products often become ordinary nouns
Kleenex
Hoover
Xerox
Nylon
Aspirin
More examples?
Back formation
" Changing a word from one part of speech (usually a noun) to a
different part of speech (usually a verb) by removing part of the
word.
" Not very productive.
" Often difficult to spot, since it might have happened long ago.
televise from television
burgle from burglar
edit from editor