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50 Cards in this Set

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Climate
The average, year-after-year conditions of temperature, precipitation, humidity, winds, and clouds in an area.
Microclimate
Climate conditions within a small area that differ from those in the surrounding area.
Tropical Zone
The area near the equator, between about 23.5° North latitude and 23.5° South latitude.
Polar Zones
The areas near both poles, from about 66.5° to 90°N and 66.5° to 90°S latitudes.
Temperate Zones
The areas between the tropical and the polar zones.
Marine Climates
The climate of some coastal regions, with relatively warm winters and cool summers.
Continental Climates
Climates with more extreme temperatures with cold winters and warm summers.
Windward
The side of a mountain that the wind hits.
Leeward
The side of a mountain range that faces away from the oncoming wind.
Monsoons
Sea and land breezes over a large region that change direction with the seasons.
Temperature Range
The difference between the highest and lowest temperatures of a day or month.
Ecosystem
A community of organisms and their abiotic environment.
Biotic Factor
An environmental factor that is associated with or results from the activities of living organisms.
Abiotic factors
Nonliving parts of the ecosystem, including rocks, water, light, and temperature.
Organism
A living thing, anything that can carry out life processes independantly.
Species
A group of organisms that can mate to produce fertile offspring.
Population
All the members of the same species that live in the same place at the same time.
Community
A group of various species that live in the same place and interact with each other.
Habitat
The place where an organism lives.
Tropical Rainforest
A forest or jungle near the equator that is characterized by large amounts of rain and little variation in temperature and that contains the greatest known diversity of organisms on Earth.
Temperature Range
The difference between the highest and lowest temperatures of a day or month.
Ecosystem
A community of organisms and their abiotic environment.
Biotic Factor
An environmental factor that is associated with or results from the activities of living organisms.
Abiotic factors
Nonliving parts of the ecosystem, including rocks, water, light, and temperature.
Organism
A living thing, anything that can carry out life processes independantly.
Species
A group of organisms that can mate to produce fertile offspring.
Population
All the members of the same species that live in the same place at the same time.
Community
A group of various species that live in the same place and interact with each other.
Habitat
The place where an organism lives.
Tropical Rainforest
A forest or jungle near the equator that is characterized by large amounts of rain and little variation in temperature and that contains the greatest known diversity of organisms on Earth.
Emergent layer
The top foliage layer in a forest where the trees extend above surrounding trees.
Canopy
The primary layer of the rainforest.
Epiphytes
Plants that use the entire surface of a tree as a place to live.
Understory
Layer beneath and shaded by the canopy of a forest.
Temperate Rainforest
Forest that has a large amount of precipitation, high humidity, and moderate temperatures.
Temperate Deciduous Forest
A forest characterized by trees that shed their leaves in the fall.
Taiga
A northern coniferous forest that stretches in a boad band across the Northern Hemisphere just below the Arctic Circle.
Savanna
Tropical biome dominated by grasses, shrubs, and small trees.
Temperate Grassland
Large area of the interior of a contnent, with moderate rainfall, but still too little for trees to grow.
Chaparral
A temperate shrubland biome that is found in all 5 parts of the world with a Mediterranean Climate.
Tundra
Biome located in northern Arctic regions.
Permafrost
Permanantly frozen layers of soil in the tundra.
Desert
Area with widely scattered vegetation and very little rain.
What is the difference between climate and microclimate?
A climate concerns the temperature, precipitation, winds, humidity, and cloud conditions in a region, while a microclimate concerns only a small area with different climates than in surrounding areas.
What is the difference between a biome and an ecosystem?
A biome is a large region with specific climate and certain types of plants and animal communities. An ecosystem is a single community of organisms and their abiotic environment. Many ecosystems can make up one biome.
What is the difference between a biotic factor and an abiotic factor?
A biotic factor is a factor associated with or resulting from the activities of a LIVING organism (producers, consumers, decomposers). Abiotic factors are NONLIVING parts of an ecosystem (water, air, sunlight, altitude, temperature, precipitation).
What is the difference between population and community?
A population is the members of the same species, while a community is made up of various species that live together and interact with each other.
What is the difference between photosynthesis and cell respiration?
Photosynthesis uses the sun, carbon dioxide, and water to build up energy. Cellular respiration uses oxygen and sugar to make carbon dioxide, water, and energy, and uses energy.
What is the difference between an herbivore, a carnivore, and an omnivore?
An herbivore only eats plants (producers), a carnivore only eats meat, and omnivores eat both producers and meat.
What are the three different world temperature zones?
Temperate, tropical, and polar.