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50 Cards in this Set

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Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one presents with Reed-Sternberg cells?
Hodgkin's
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one is associated with HIV and immunosuppression?
NHL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one involves multiple, peripheral nodes, with common extranodal involvement?
NHL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one is localized to a single group of nodes, with contiguous spread and rare extranodal involvement?
HL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one presents with constitutional signs/symptoms: low-grade fever, night sweats, weight loss?
HL (NHL has few signs/symptoms)
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one presents with mediastinal lymphadenopathy?
HL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one involves mostly the B cells (except lymphoblastic origin)?
NHL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one has hypergammaglobulinemia?
neither. Multiple Myeloma has hypergammaglobulinemia, where the excess B cells are in the resting state.
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one has a 50% association with EBV?
HL
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one has bimodal age distribution?
HL (NHL has peak incidence at 20-40 years old)
Lymphomas: Hodgkin's Versus NHL: Which one has more common male presentation?
HL
Hodgkin's What factors denote a good prognosis?
Increased lymphocytes, decreased RS cells.
Hodgkin's Which HL type has the best prognosis?
Nodular sclerosing (65-75%), which has least RS cells and lots of lymphocytes. Lymphocyte-predominant LH also has excellent prognosis.
Hodgkin's Which HL type is the most common?
Nodular sclerosing, affecting women more than men and primarily young adults.
Hodgkin's What is the prognosis of mixed cellular HL?
Intermediate. There are lots of lymphocytes but also lots of RS cells.
Hodgkin's Which HL type has the worst prognosis?
Lymphocyte-depleted, which affects older males with disseminated disease.
Hodgkin's Which HL type has the most RS cells?
Mixed cellular.
Which NHL type has only B cells?
Small Lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, Burkitt's
Which NHL type has a mix of B cells and T cells?
Diffuse large cell , occurring mostly in elderly but sometimes in children.
Which NHL type has only T cells?
Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, which has immature T cells. It is a very aggressive T-cell lymphoma.
Which type is associated with a t(8;14) c-myc gene mutation?
Burkitt's Lymphoma, occurring mostly in children. Has a high-grade "starry sky" appearance.
Which type is associated with a t(14;18) mutation and overexpression of bcl-2?
Follicular lymphoma, which is difficult to cure but has an indolent course.
Which type is associated with EBV infection and is endemic in africa?
Burkitt's
Which is the most common childhood NHL?
Lymphoblastic Lymphoma, which also presents with ALL and a mediastinal mass.
Which is the most common adult version of NHL?
Follicular lymphoma.
Which NHL types occur in adults?
Small lymphocytic lymphoma, follicular lymphoma.
Which NHL types occur in children?
Lymphoblastic lymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma.
Which NHL has a distribution of 80% adults and 20% children?
Diffuse large cell lymphoma, which ALSO has an 80% B cells 20% T cell distribution.
Which low-grade NHL type presents like CLL?
Small Lymphocytic lymphoma.
Leukemias: Peripheral and bone marrow characteristics
Increased circulating leukocytes, bone marrow infiltrates of leukemic cells
Leukemias: Consequences of marrrow failure
Anemia (dec. RBC's), infections (dec. WBC's), hemorrhage (dec. platelets)
Leukemias: Common organs of infiltration
Liver, spleen, lymph nodes
Leukemias: Characteristics of acute leukemias
Blasts predominate, children or elderly, short or drastic course
Leukemias: ALL characteristics (4)
Lympholasts (pre-B or pre-T), children, most responsive to therapy, associated with Down's Syndrome
Leukemias: AML characteristics (3)
Myeloblasts, adults, auer rods
Leukemias: Characteristics of chronic leukemias
More mature cells, midlife age range, longer, less devastating course
Leukemias: CLL characteristics - cells
Lymphocytes, non-Ab producing B cells, increased smudge cells on peripheral blood smear
Leukemias: CLL - population
older adults
Leukemias: CLL - presentation and course
lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, few sx., indolent course
Leukemias: CLL is similar to?
very similar to SLL (small lymphocytic lymphoma)
Leukemias: CLL is associated with?
warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia
Leukemias: CML cell characteristics
Myeloid stem cells, increased neutrophils and metamyelocytes
Leukemias: CML translocation?
Ph Chromosome, t(9;22), bcr-abl
Leukemias: CML acute complications?
blast crisis (AML)
what chromosomal translocation? CML
Ph chromosome, t(9;22), bcr-abl
what chromosomal translocation? Burkitt's lymphoma
t(8;14), c-myc activation
what chromosomal translocation? Follicular lymphomas
t(14;18), bcl-2 activation
what chromosomal translocation? AML- M3 type
t(15;17), responsive to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)
what chromosomal translocation? Ewing's sarcoma
t(11;22)
what chromosomal translocation? Mantle cell lymphoma
t(11;14)