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65 Cards in this Set

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Who speaks these lines, and to whom? -
"I have decked my bed with coverings of tapestry, with carved works, with fine linen of Egypt. I have perfumed my bed with myrrh, aloes, and cinnamon. Come, let us take our fill of love until the morning: let us solace ourselves with loves."
the adulteress (in the text, a woman with the "attire of an harlot"); spoken to "a young man void of understanding."
Who is the speaker of these lines?

"Yahweh possessed me int he beginning of his way, before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was."
Wisdom
When Satan comes before Yahweh, Yahweh asks him what he has been doing. What is Satan's reply?
"From going to and fro in the earth, and from walking up and down in it."
After Satan has smitten Job with boils, what advice does Job's wife give him and what is his reply?
Job's wife tells him to "curse God, and die;" Job replies that she talks like a "foolish woman" and asks, "shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?"
How do Job's friends spend the time between their arrival and Job's first speech?
They sit down with him on the ground for a week in silence, "for they saw that his grief was very great."
Which of these men speaks first?

Bildad, Elihu, Eliphaz, Zophar
Eliphaz
Which of these men speaks last?

Bildad, Elihu, Eliphaz, Zophar
Elihu
Eliphaz describes his "vision of the night." How did it affect him, and what did he learn from it?
It caused him fear and trembling so as to make "all [his] bones to shake;" he learns that "hardship does not spring from the soil," implying that Job must have done something to deserve this judgment
Whom does Job address in these verses from ch. 7, and what reference does he make to Genesis and to Psalm 8?

"Am I a sea, or a whale, that thou settest a watch over me?
What is man, that thou shouldest magnify him? and that thou shouldest set thine heart upon him?"
Job addresses God; these lines reference Psalm 8 by parodying the concern of God for his people in the line "What is man, that thou art mindful of him?", and references the appointed dominion of man over the "fish of the sea" and "every living thing" by God in Genesis.
What do his accusing "friends" want Job to admit that he refuses to concede?
They want him to admit his sin ("unto God I would commit my cause") which could, in their minds, be the only justification for his misery.
"No doubt but ye are the people, and wisdom shall die with you." Who speaks, and what is his tone of voice?
Job; sarcastic tone.
Which of the speakers in the book of Job introduces himself with these words, and what do they mean?

"Great men are not always wise; neither do the aged understand judgment. Therefore I said, Hearken to me; I also will show mine opinion."
Elihu; they mean that Elihu, though younger, feels the speeches of the elder and so-called "wise" friends ineffective and thus will speak out himself.
Who describes Behemoth and Leviathan, and what are they?
Yahweh; "Behemoth" - in Hebrew, 'majesty,' but could also represent a hippopotamus or crocodile; "Leviathan" - crocodile
Quote the final line (verse) that Job speaks.
"Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes." - Job 42:6
On what condition does God, in the end, consent to forgive Job's friends who spoke so foolishly?
If Job should pray for Yahweh to grant them mercy.
In Ecclesiastes 3, what is the final opinion of the speaker (Qoheleth) about life after death?
Qoheleth's opinion is agnostic and states that the concept of life after death is problematic.
According to Qoheleth (see Ecclesiastes chs. 5 & 9), what is the best way to spend one's lifetime "under the sun"?
"to eat, and to drink, and to be merry." (Eccl. 8:15)
When Naomi (whose name means "pleasant") returned to Bethlehem, she said her name should be changed to Mara. Why? What do you think Mara means?
Because she believes "the Almighty hath dealt very bitterly" with her, and Mara means "bitter."
Indicate how this person is related to the heroine in the book of Ruth:

Elimelech
father-in-law to Ruth
Indicate how this person is related to the heroine in the book of Ruth:

Orpah
sister-in-law to Ruth
Indicate how this person is related to the heroine in the book of Ruth:

Obed
son to Ruth
At what season of the year do Naomi and Ruth return to Bethlehem?
During the season of the "barley harvest," around the Feast of Weeks (what would be for us in April, in the spring).
When Ruth goes to Boaz on the threshing floor, how does she first prepare herself (by Naomi's advice)?
she washes herself and "anoint[s]" herself with perfume, and puts on her "raiment;" this is like a wedding preparation
What is Boaz telling the kinsman/redeemer in this speech, and why does the kinsman decline to act?

"Then said Boaz, 'What day thou buyest the field of the hand of Naomi, thou must buy it also of Ruth the Moabitess, the wife of the dead, to raise up the name of the dead upon his inheritance.'"
Boaz is telling the kinsman/redeemer that in order for him to inherit Naomi's "field" he must also inherit Ruth as his wife; the kinsman declines to act because taking Ruth as his wife might "mar" his own inheritance.
Explain the point of this blessing which thep eople of Bethlehem bestow on Ruth and Boaz:

"Yahweh make the woman that is come into thine house like Rachel and like Leah... And let thy house be like the house of Pharez, whom Tamar bore unto Judah."
Celebrates the heroic woman and connects the ancestral lines of Ruth as far back as Tamar, while also setting up the ancestral connection to David mentioned at the end of the chapter.
Mordecai is said to be descended from Kish, and Haman is an Agagite. By this rivalry, the author points to what racial conflict found in 1 Samuel?
This points to the conflict between the Israelites and Amalekites in Samuel 1 where Saul angered Samuel by sparing Agag
From which of the twelve tribes are Esther and Mordecai descended?
Benjamin
"Haman was fallen on the bed where Esther was." What does he want of her? What makes this action ironic?
Haman wants Esther to pardon his life from the wrath of King Xerxes; this action is ironic because it causes the King to think that Haman is molesting Esther and fires his anger even more.
In the book of Esther, two more women besides the heroine have distinctive parts in the story. Who are they, and what are their roles?
Vashti - she is queen prior to Esther and is deposed as an example of punishment for disobedience; Zeresh - Haman's wife, who with Haman's friends often advises him.
Explain the dramatic irony in this speech:

"Then said Zeresh his wife and all his friends unot him, 'Let a gallows be made of fifty cubits high, and tomorrow speak thou unot the king that Mordecai may be hanged thereon; then go thou in merrily with the king unto the banquet."
Haman has this gallows built with the intention of having Mordecai hanged on it but ends up, ironically, being hanged on it himself.
Why is Jonah reluctant to go prophesy against Nineveh?
Because he knows that the people of Nineveh will repent and that God will be "gracious" and "merciful" to them if he prophesies against Nineveh.
Where does Jonah take ship, and where (approximately) is the vessel headed?
He takes ship in Joppa; the vessel is headed for Tarshish.
What is Jonah's attitude toward "Zionism" (the Diaspora belief that Jews are destined to return to Jerusalem)?
Jonah strongly supports the idea of Zionism; he is angry with God for sparing Nineveh and the Assyrians within who continue to keep the Jews in their diaspora, out of Jerusalem.
In a sentence or two, explain the point of this verse from the end of the book of Jonah:

"Then said Yahweh, 'Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for the which thou hast not labored, neither madest it grow; which came up in a night, and perished in a night...."
God points out that Jonah grieves with compassion for the "gourd," though he has in no way been responsible for its creation or tending; God, in the next verse, relates this idea to his compassion for Nineveh.
In the first part of the book, who is the king that Daniel serves and over what historical empire does he rule?
Nebuchadnezzar; the Babylonian empire
What miracle is accomplished by Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego?
They survive being thrown into the fiery furnace, emerging without a "hair of their head[s] singed."
Which TWO dreams of the great king he serves are interpreted by Daniel?
1. The dream in which the king sees a large statue made of gold, then silver, then bronze, then iron and an iron/clay mix as it descends the statue's parts; 2. The dream in which a tree grows large and strong until a holy messenger calls out for it to be cut down to a stump, left to live with the animals till seven years pass.
Where in Daniel does this strange message occur: "MENE, MENE, TEKEL, UPHARSIN"?
These words are written on the palace wall by a mysterious hand during the reign of King Belshazzar.
In the latter part of the book, which empire is the fourth kingdom (or final power on earth before the world ends) in Daniel's prophecy of the four beasts?
Greece
What is one obvious difference between the woman in Proverbs 31 ("Who can find a virtuous woman? for her price is far above rubies") and the woman in Proverbs 8 ("For wisdom is better than rubies")?
The woman of Proverbs 8 represents wisdom personified, "possessed" by the Lord "in the beginning of his way, before the works of old;" the woman of Proverbs 31, though she speaks wisdom, represents virtue and embodies the qualities of a noble wife.
Explain how the two halves are connected metaphorically:

"Counsel in the heart of man is like deep water, but a man of understanding will draw it out."
Understanding allows one to reach deeper into the "heart of man" and be able to bring out "counsel" from these depths; a man without "understanding" could not reach so deep.
Explain how the two halves are connected metaphorically:

"There is gold, and a multitude of rubies; but the lips of knowledge are a precious jewel."
True treasure is not gold or rubies, for there are many of these, but rather knowledgable speech, for this is rare.
Explain how the two halves are connected metaphorically:

"The glory of young men is their strength: and the beauty of old men is the grey head."
All ages have their splendor: strength in youth and dignified beauty in later years.
Describe the metaphor (i.e., the acutal thing or activity or personification imagined) in this verse spoken in Job:

"Yet man is born to trouble, as the sparks fly upward."
Job, as a human, is as likely to sin as sparks are likely to "fly upward" - very likely.
Describe the metaphor (i.e., the acutal thing or activity or personification imagined) in this verse spoken in Job:

"My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle."
Job's life is emptying of hope like thread empties from a weaver's shuttle.
Describe the metaphor (i.e., the acutal thing or activity or personification imagined) in this verse spoken in Job:

"I have said to Corruption, Thou art my father: to the worm, Thou art my mother."
If Job gives into this unjust accusation, he will be as much a hopeless fraud as if he were be offspring to "Corruption" and "the worm."
What details are we given that help us identify the presumed narrator of Ecclesiastes 1 and 2?
He's the "son of David," the "king of Jerusalem," and has "gottne more wisdom than all they that have been before [him] in Jerusalem."
In a sentence or two, contrast the viewpoint expressed in these verses with the providential outlook of the Deuteronomists:

-"Cast thy bread upon the waters: for thou shalt find it after many days."
-"He that observeth the wind shall not sow; and he that regardeth the clouds shall not reap."
These lines are not concerned with the law or God's care and guidance so much as they are with a wisdom and maintaining a worldview. The idea of Providence has here, as in the second passage, been replaced by worldly retribution.
Identify this aging body part characterized by a metaphor (i.e., by a thing or/and activity) in these lines:

"In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened..."

(the keepers of the house)
arms
Identify this aging body part characterized by a metaphor (i.e., by a thing or/and activity) in these lines:

"In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened..."

(the strong men)
knees
Identify this aging body part characterized by a metaphor (i.e., by a thing or/and activity) in these lines:

"In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened..."

(the grinders)
teeth
Identify this aging body part characterized by a metaphor (i.e., by a thing or/and activity) in these lines:

"In the day when the keepers of the house shall tremble, and the strong men shall bow themselves, and the grinders cease because they are few, and those that look out of the windows be darkened..."

(the windows)
eyes
Give an example of ritual purity (Jewish holiness) from this book: Esther
Mordecai refuses to worship Haman at the risk of his life, in favor of his Judaism.
Give an example of ritual purity (Jewish holiness) from this book: Daniel
Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego defy the imposed idolatry at the risk of their lives.
Give an example of Deuteronomic Providence from this book: Ruth
Ruth makes a covenant when with Naomi making "thy God my God" and promising to always be loyal. God repays Ruth for her loyalty - "hesed" - and goodness by giving her a child, of which, down the lineage, David is born.
Give an example of Deuteronomic Providence from this book: Jonah
The Ninevites put on sackcloth and fully repent their wickedness, and God favors them again; inferably God guided Jonah to threaten them knowing they would repent and regain his favor.
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

At "that time" shall Michael stand up...
the apocalypse
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

...which standeth for "the children of thy people:" and there...
a future generation of Israelites
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

...as never was "since there was a nation" even to that same time...
since the beginning of the nations
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

every one that shall be found written in "the book"
a heavenly record book, the "Book of the Living," containing the names of the righteous
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

...and there shall be "a time of trouble"...
period of greatest distress comes right before the apocalypse
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth "shall awake, some to everlasting life,..."
a statement of ressurection
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

But thou, O Daniel, "shut up the words, and seal the book,..."
Daniel needs to keep them secret
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

...even to "the time of the end:"
the apocalypse
These words are spoken by a celestial being in the form of a "man" at the start of the final chapter. (Michael was considered the Jews' patron angel.) Explain the words:

many shall run to and fro, and "knowledge shall be increased."
people will try to gain the knowledge Daniel has.