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55 Cards in this Set

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abandon
n. total lack of inhibition
Because there was no parental supervision at the party, the teens partied with abandon.
abate
v. to decrease, to reduce
His enthusiasm for school abated when he found out that none of his friends were in his classes.
abet
v. to aid; to act as an accomplice
Shawn abetted his brother in his tepee of the neighbor's house by being the lookout.
abjure
v. to renounce under oath; to abandon forever; to abstain from
After being in jail for 10 years, the criminal decided to abjure his bad ways and lead a good life.
abnegate
v. to give up; to deny to oneself
The man abnegated all worldly pleasures in preparation for becoming a priest.
abortive
adj. ending without results
The doctor was still clueless about his patient's mystery illness after several abortive tests.
abrogate
v. to annul; to abolish by authoritative action
The principal abrogated the students' study hall because he felt that the time wasn't being used wisely.
abscond
v. to leave quickly in secret
The man absconded during the night when he found out that the police were on his tail.
abstemious
adj. done sparingly; consuming in moderation
The health-concious girl ate junk food abstemiously.
accede
v. to express approval, to agree to
Carla proposed a reasonable curfew time to her parents who happily acceded.
acclivity
n. an incline or upward slope, the ascending side of a hill
The runners paled as they approached the steep acclivity.
accretion
n. a growth in size, an increase in amount
Her accretion in make up led to an over-cluttered bathroom and an annoyed mom.
acme
n. the highest level or degree attainable
The woman reached the acme of her career when she became the CEO of the company.
actuate
v. to put into motion, to activate; to motivate or influence to activity
The coach's skillful guidance actuated the team to train hard to make it to states.
acuity
n. sharp vision or perception characterized by the ability to resolve fine detail
Both Adrian Monk and Shawn Spencer display great acuity when investigating crime scenes.
acumen
n. sharpness of insight, mind, and understanding; shrewd judgment
The detective's acumen helped him solve even the toughest of cases.
adamant
adj. stubbornly unyielding
The mother was adamant about her daughter's curfew; she was to be home no later than 11:00.
adept
adj. extremely skilled
The adept waiter maneuvered around the tables with ease, even with a tray of heavy dishes.
adjudicate
v. to hear and settle a matter; to act as a judge
Whenver the family had a problem, the father would set up a mock court and adjudicate the issue.
adjure
v. to appeal to
The boy adjured to his mother for a greater allowance.
admonish
v. to caution or warn gently in order to correct something
The mother admonished the little girl for eating cookies right before dinner.
adroit
adj. skillful; accomplished; highly competent
The boy was quite the opposite of adroit; he was always tripping over things.
adulation
n. excessive flattery or admiration
The brown-noser showered her teachers with adulation.
adumbrate
v. to give a hint or indication of something to come
The psychic adumbrated that the man would soon strike it rich.
aerie
n. a nest built high in the air; an elevated, often secluded, dwelling
The bird built an aerie in the tallest tree in the forest.
affected
adj. phony, artificial
Marc wanted people to feel sorry for him, so he walked with an affected limp.
aggregate
n. a collective mass, the sum total
The boys pooled their money to make an aggregate of candy cash.
algorithm
n. an established procedure for solving a problem or equation
The math teacher taught his students an algorithm that could be used to solve any matrix multiplication problem.
alimentary
adj. 1. pertaining to food, nutrition, or digestion; 2. providing nourishment
The guest was delighted by the alimentary meal.
allay
v. to lessen, ease, reduce in intensity
The father allayed his daughter's fear of the dark by scaring the "monsters" away.
amity
n. friendship, good will
There was a good deal of amity between the former competitors.
amorphous
adj. having no definite form
Linda had added to much water to the clay mixture, causing it to become an amorphous blob.
animus
n. a feeling of animosity or ill will
As the two football teams entered the stadium, the feeling of animus heightened exponentially.
anodyne
n. a source of comfort; a medicine that relieves pain
For Carol, chicken soup was her anodyne when she was sick.
anomaly
n. a deviation from the common rule, something that is difficult to classify
Jake was an anomaly in his high school because he was middle class while everyone else was rich.
anthropomorphic
adj. suggesting human characteristics for animals and inanimate things
My favorite story as a child featred an anthropomorphic pig named Wilbur.
antiquated
adj. too old to be fashionable or useful
Marissa eyed her parents' antiquated car with distaste; she wanted a Lexus.
aphorism
n. a short statement of a principle
The country doctor would give aphorisms like "Still waters run deep."
aplomb
n. self-confident assurance; poise
The actress had great aplomb on stage, making her a star.
apostate
n. one who renounces a religious faith
As an act of defiance, the teenage boy became an apostate.
apposite
adj. strikingly appropriate or well adapted
Bree was the perfect hostess; she would always supply apposite anecdotes during dinner parties.
apprise
v. to give notice to, inform
My mother thanked me when I apprised her of a scheduling change.
appropriate
v. to assign to a particular purpose, allocate
The principal appropriated the school's funding to buying new computers.
arable
adj. suitable for cultivation
The family had to find arable land in order to grow their food.
arcane
adj. secret, obscure; known only to a few
The Brotherhood was an arcane group with only a few members.
archipelago
n. a large group of islands
The Hawaiian islands are an example of an archipelago.
arrears
n. unpaid, overdue debts or bills; neglected obligations
The mother was so swamped with arrears that she faced eviction from her home.
arrogate
v. to claim without justification; to claim for oneself without right
The team hated it when Lynn arrogated the credit for its win when she really sat on the bench for most of the game.
askance
adv. with disapproval; with a skeptical sideways glance
She looked askance at her friend who had just announced that she found a date for the prom; it was the first day of school.
assent
v. to agree, as to a proposal
Nina assented to her employee's pitch on Dove shampoo.
atavistic
adj. characteristic of a former era, ancient
George Dawson, having grown up in the early 20th century, acquired what are now atavistic skills: breaking horses, driving mules, and picking cotton.
autocrat
n. a dictator
Adolf Hitler is probably the most infamous autocrat in history.
aver
v. to declare to be true; to affirm
When asked if her friend was telling the truth, Sara averred.
avuncular
adj. like an uncle in behavior, especially in kindness and warmth
The RA's avuncular personality made him the most popular staff member on the CTY campus.
awry
adv. crooked, askew, amiss
She knew that her little sister had been in her room because everything had gone awry.