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23 Cards in this Set

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noun
: the point in the path of a celestial body (as a planet) that is farthest from the sun
aphelion
"ap" derives from New Latin prefix that means "away from" (the mnemonic "'A' for 'away'" can help too); "peri-," on the other hand, means "near." (it is the opposite of perihelion) based on the Greek word "hēlios," meaning "sun," while "apogee" and "perigee" are based on "gaia," meaning "earth."
the burning of a heritic during the Inquisition
auto-da-fe
Portuguese for "act of faith"
noun
: a man of elevated rank or station
grandee
from Spanish word "grandes"
verb
1 : to bear fruit
2 : to make fruitful or productive
fructify
from the Middle English "fructifien" and ultimately from the Latin noun "fructus," meaning "fruit." *like "fructose"
adjective
: not commensurable; broadly : lacking a basis of comparison in respect to a quality normally subject to comparison
incommensurable
means "having a common measure" or "corresponding in size, extent, amount, or degree." Middle French and Late Latin, ultimately deriving from Latin "mensura," meaning "measure."
adjective
: lacking life, spirit, or zest : languid
lackadaisical
adjective
1 : of or relating to those who habitually eat together
*2 : living in a relationship in which one organism obtains food or other benefits from another without damaging or benefiting it
commensal
derives from the Latin prefix "com-," meaning "with, together, jointly" and the Latin adjective "mensalis," meaning "of the table."
adjective
*1 : guilty of a moral offense : sinning
2 : violating a principle or rule : faulty
peccant
from the Latin verb "peccare," which means "to sin," "to commit a fault," or "to stumble," and is related to the better-known English word "peccadillo" ("a slight offense"). Etymologists have suggested that "peccare" might be related to the Latin "ped-, pes," meaning "foot." A related Latin adjective, "peccus," may have been used to mean "having an injured foot" or "stumbling."
noun
1 : vocation, trade
*2 : an area of activity in which one excels : forte
métier • \MET-yay\
a French borrowing acquired by English speakers in the 18th century, typically implies a calling for which one feels especially fitted.
adjective
*1 : exceeding what is sufficient or necessary : extra
2 : not needed : unnecessary
superfluous • \soo-PER-floo-us\
comes from the Latin adjective "superfluus," meaning literally "running over" or "overflowing." "Superfluus," in turn, derives from the combination of the prefix "super-" (meaning "over" or "more") and "fluere," "to flow." ("Fluere" also gave us "fluid," "fluent," and "influence," among others.)
adjective
: marked by or given to vehement insistent outcry
vociferous
derives from the Latin "vox," which means "voice."
adjective
: readily predictable : automatic; also : reacting in a readily predictable way
knee-jerk
It usually denotes a too-hasty, impulsive, perhaps even irrational response that is often based on preconceived notions.
noun
: a novel about the moral and psychological growth of the main character
bildungsroman • \BIL-doonks-roh-MAHN ("oo" as in "good")\
combination of two German words: "Bildung," meaning "education," and "Roman," meaning "novel."
verb
1 : to include especially within a particular scope
*2 : to be made up of
3 : compose, constitute
comprise
adjective
: given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth
mendacious
It is somewhat more diplomatic and formal than "lying." In fact, this word has very bland deception and habitual untruthfulness
noun
: a secretly plotted and suddenly executed attempt to overthrow a government
putsch • \PUCH ("U" is as in "butcher")\
native Swiss German it meant "knock" or "thrust." Now it is the same word for "cou d'etat" in Swiss German.
noun
: a brief moment of emotional excitement : shudder, thrill
frisson • \free-SOHNG (the last vowel is pronounced nasally, and the final "ng" is not pronounced)\
traces to the Old French "friçon," which in turn derives from "frictio," Latin for "friction." The association came about because "frictio" (which derives from the Latin "fricare," meaning "to rub") was once mistakenly taken to be a derivative of "frigēre," which means "to be cold."
noun
1 : a binary compound of bromine with another element or a radical including some (as potassium bromide) used as sedatives
2 a : a commonplace or tiresome person : bore *b : a commonplace or hackneyed statement or notion
bromide
noun
1 : a philosophical or theological point proposed for disputation; also : a disputation on such a point
*2 : a whimsical combination of familiar melodies or texts
quodlibet
from Lating meaning "any whatever" - the name for philosophical academic events. form of "quilibet," from "qui," meaning "what," and "libet," meaning "it pleases."
verb
1 : marry
*2 : to take up and support as a cause : become attached to
espouse
"spouse" are related, both deriving from the Latin verb "spondēre," meaning "to betroth."
adjective
: speaking in or characterized by a high-flown often bombastic style or manner
magniloquent
"Magnus" means "great" in Latin; "loqui" is a Latin verb meaning "to speak."
noun
*1: an informal conversation : chat
2: a short informal essay
causerie
traced back to the French "causer" ("to chat") and ultimately to the Latin "causa" ("cause, reason")
noun
1 : the holder of an office or ecclesiastical benefice
*2 : one that occupies a particular position or place
incumbent
came to English through Anglo-French, and derives from the Latin "incumbere," meaning "to lie down on."