Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/9

Click to flip

9 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
hierarchy
Ordering based on some relationship.
abstraction
Highlighting important properties or features while hiding the nonessential details. Allows us to reduce complexity to a manageable level.
encapsulation
Information hiding. Seperating components of an object into internal and external views.
modularity
Use of smaller components to construct larger systems. Makes a complex system easier to understand. Reduces cost of systems if the components are reusable or off-the-shelf.
dependency
There are different kinds of relationships among classes. This one is the weakest. Represents a "uses-a" relationship. Sometimes called realization.
association
One of the stronger relationships between classes. Occurs any time that an object from one class is used within another.
aggregation
A special kind of association (has-a) that results when a client class contains one or more instance variables belonging to another type (implements modularity). Allows you to build complex objects from existing components.
inheritance
The ability of a class to inherit attributes and behaviors from a parent class. Defines a relationship among classes. Shown by the java keyword "extends". Used with a is-a relationship.
polymorphism
Used to describe a variable that may refer to objects whose class is not known at compile time and which respond at run time according to the actual class of the object to which they refer