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50 Cards in this Set

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Willa Cather is one of the most interesting women writers in American literary history.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Both a teacher, a journalist and a critic as well as a writer, Cather plays an important part in the shaping of American modernist thought and writings.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Her fiction is unique in its powerful representation of setting and character and rich in its language and imagery.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Her style of writing is condensed and subtle, but nonetheless tremendously expressive
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1896 - She takes an editorial job at the magazine Home Monthly in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and writes reviews for the Pittsburgh Leader.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1900 - Cather lives in Washington for a few months and works as a correspondent for two Pittsburgh magazines, and in March she returns to Pittsburgh, where she becomes a high school teacher at Central High School.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1902 - Willa Cather travels in Europe with Isabella McClung.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1903 - Cather publishes a book of poetry, April Twilights, and meets Edith Lewis.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1905 - She publishes a collection of short stories The Troll Garden.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1908 - Cather meets and befriends New Hampshire regional writer Sarah Orne Jewett, who becomes a great inspiration for her later works. She also begins to share an apartment with Edith Lewis, and they live together until her death.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1912 - Publication of her first novel - Alexander's Bridge.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1913 - O Pioneers! is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1915 - The Song of the Lark is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1918 - My Ántonia is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1920 - The short story collection Youth and the Bright Medusa is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1922 - Cather publishes One of Ours for which she receives the Pulitzer Prize for fiction from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She also joins the Episcopal Church and her literary focus alters considerably. She later writes that in this year, the world broke in two for her.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1923 - A Lost Lady is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1925 - The Professor's House is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1926 - Death Comes for the Archbishop and My Mortal Enemy are published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1930 - Willa Cather gets the Howells Medal from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters for Death Comes for the Archbishop.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1931 - Shadows on the Rock is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1932 - The collection of short stories Obscure Destinies is published. It includes the story Neighbour Rosicky. Furthermore, she receives the Prix Femina Americaine for distinguished literary accomplishment.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1935 - Lucy Gayheart is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1936 - The essay collection Not under Forty is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1938 - Sapphira and the slave Girl is published.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1944 - She receives the Gold Medal of the National Institute of Arts and Letters.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
1947 - April 24, Willa Cather dies and is buried in New Hampshire.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Willa Sibert Cather was born in Back Creek, Virginia in 1873, but moved with her family to Red Cloud, Nebraska at the age of ten. Red Cloud was a small town in the midst of rough prairie, and the settlers who inhabited the town were mainly Scandinavian, Bohemian, and French immigrants trying to cultivate the obstinate land. "Americans" were a minority.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
This childhood environment greatly influenced Cather’s life as an artist and became one of the main resources from which she extracted her vivid depictions of character and setting. It oriented her toward the land, the immigrants and Europe – in short, toward the essence of American pioneer experience.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Her studies had led her toward a creative life and career – she had composed several short stories as well as worked for the Nebraska Journal writing reviews of books, plays and music.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Willa Cather published her first novel, Alexander’s Bridge, in 1912. She was 40 years old at the time and felt ready to enter the literary scene. Her next three novels, O Pioneers! (1913), The Song of the Lark (1915), and My Ántonia (1918), shared a common theme of heroic womanhood in the face of great hardship, and they firmly established her as an important writer on the American literary scene. She had started on the path that would place her among the most important modernist women writers.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Cather never had any romantic interest in men – her emotional life centered around women.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Whether lesbian or not, which is a question greatly debated, her estrangement from conventional sexuality and sex roles is a major underlying theme in most of her writings and it shapes many of her main characters.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
In her personal life, Cather lived with Edith Lewis, another Nebraskan which she had met in 1903, from 1908 until her death in 1947.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Despite her relatively happy, personal life (even if marred by poor health), Cather became increasingly distressed with the world around her.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
She – like so many other modernist writers – was troubled by the growing mechanization and mass-produced quality of American society.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
In 1922, she wrote that the world broke in two for her. This was also the time when her writing took a new direction and became more concerned with finding alternative values to the materialistic life she increasingly felt around her.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Both of the novels from this second stage, A Lost Lady (1923) and The Professor’s House (1925), deal with spiritual and cultural crisis for the main characters. The frustration with modern society and the sense of spiritual decay were also reflected in Willa Cather’s personal life, when she, parallel to entering her new line of writing, in 1922 joined the Episcopal Church.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
In 1926, Willa Cather’s writings entered into their third stage. This period was initiated by the novel Death Comes for the Archbishop in which Cather reveals a newfound theme – the vanished past of the American Southwest where nature and Christianity is opposed to modern urban life and society.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
This highly critical view of the present as opposed to the past, which she shared with most modernists, became more pronounced as she grew older.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Alongside her fictional writing, Cather was also an accomplished literary critic who produced an extensive body of critical work on the nature of art and its function in life.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Her view as a critic on literature and art noticeably permeates her own fictional writings in style, language as well as form.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Generally, her main focus is the description of character over plot, but not at all with the same stress on subjectivity that characterized other women writers of the time.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Rather she let a life unfold through a steady but loose accumulation of conversation and internal reminiscence with minimal intrusion by a narrator, and often keeping the reader at a distance – thereby choosing to evoke character rather than explain it.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Rather she let a life unfold through a steady but loose accumulation of conversation and internal reminiscence with minimal intrusion by a narrator, and often keeping the reader at a distance – thereby choosing to evoke character rather than explain it. She once described her goal as "suggestion rather than enumeration." Also, she often gives priority to the expressiveness of setting and thus letting the individuality of the character disappear in favor of a portrayal of human nature against the background of nature.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Cather’s style is very condensed, almost minimalistic – she often described her work as "unfurnished" – which gives a sense of ‘top of the iceberg’ quality much in line with Hemingway’s writing. She is undoubtedly among the most important American modernist writers.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
In the course of her life, Willa Cather wrote 12 novels, numerous pieces of short fiction and poetry and an abundance of reviews, articles and critical texts - most of which have at some point been published in various collections. Her first novel was published after she turned 40, but she was writing most of her life - from a very early age up until her death in 1947, when she was 73 years old.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Cather's work is a highly personal and passionate matter - a feature, which on occasion has led to wrongful misconceptions of the nature of her art. Many of the characters in Cather's fictional works are inspired by real life people that Cather knew or had heard of. There is thus often a noticeable (auto)biographical strain to be found in her works. In the same way, her most frequently used settings are places she knew well - especially the frontier environment of her native Nebraska.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
Consequently, Cather has often been dismissed as a sentimentalist and a local colorist. In such characterizations are implied that she is an author not to be taken seriously. However, this judgement is a grave misrepresentation of her work, as it is a mistake to interpret her works solely in terms of these features.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.
In general, Cather as one of her most significant qualities mastered the art of expressing the common through the specific. Her work thus reveals a fundamental understanding of human nature and experience even if so firmly rooted in her own life.
Lindhard, Anne. Willa Cather Site. 13 Jan. 2002. 19 Jan. 2005 <http://fp.image.dk/fpemarxlind/>.