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19 Cards in this Set

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This decision upheld the power of Congress to charter a bank as a government agency, and denied the state the power to tax that agency.
McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819
This decision declared private corporation charters to be contracts and immune form impairment by states' legislative action. It freed corporations from the states which created them.
Dartmouth College v. Woodward, 1819
This case ruled that only the federal government has authority over interstate commerce.
Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824
Under this Treaty, Spain sold Florida to the U.S., and the U.S. gave up its claims to Texas
Adam-Onis Treaty, 1819
Acquisition of Florida from Spain, 1819
Admitted Missouri as a slave state and at the same time admitted Maine as a free state. Declared that all territory north of the 36°30" latitude would become free states, and all territory south of that latitude would become slave states.
Missouri Compromise, 1820
Declared that Europe should not interfere in the affairs of the Western Hemisphere and that any attempt at interference by a European power would be seen as a threat to the U.S. It also declared that a New World colony which has gained independence may not be recolonized by Europe. (It was written at a time when many South American nations were gaining independence). Only England, in particular George Canning, supported the Monroe Doctrine. Mostly just a show of nationalism, the doctrine had no major impact until later in the 1800s.
Monroe Doctrine, 1823
charged high duties
Sectional Tariff, 1824
Popular vote: Jackson - 152,933 (42%), Adams - 115,626 (32%), Clay - 47,136 (13%), Crawford - 46,979 (13%). Electoral vote: Jackson - 99, Adams - 84, Crawford - 41, Clay - 37. House vote: Adams - 13, Jackson - 7, Crawford - 4, Clay - dropped. Jackson did not have a majority in the electoral vote, so the election went to the House of Representatives, where Adams won.
Favorite Sons Election, 1824
The charge make by Jacksonians in 1825 that Clay had supported John Quincy Adams in the House presidential vote in return for the office of Secretary of State. Clay knew he could not win, so he traded his votes for an office.
"Corrupt Bargain", 1824
Also called Tariff of 1828, it raised the tariff on imported manufactured goods. The tariff protected the North but harmed the South; South said that the tariff was economically discriminatory and unconstitutional because it violated state's rights. It passed because New England favored high tariffs.
Tariff of Abominations
When faced with the protective Tariff of 1828, John Calhoun presented a theory in the South Carolina Exposition and Protest (1828) that federal tariffs could be declared null and void by individual states and that they could refuse to enforce them. South Carolina called a convention in 1832, after the revised Tariff of 1828 became the Tariff of 1832, and passed an ordinance forbidding collection of tariff duties in the state. This was protested by Jackson.
Calhoun's Exposition and Protest, 1828
This decision upheld the power of Congress to charter a bank as a government agency, and denied the state the power to tax that agency.
McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819
This decision declared private corporation charters to be contracts and immune form impairment by states' legislative action. It freed corporations from the states which created them.
Dartmouth College v. Woodward, 1819
This case ruled that only the federal government has authority over interstate commerce.
Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824
Under this Treaty, Spain sold Florida to the U.S., and the U.S. gave up its claims to Texas
Adam-Onis Treaty, 1819
Acquisition of Florida from Spain, 1819
Admitted Missouri as a slave state and at the same time admitted Maine as a free state. Declared that all territory north of the 36°30" latitude would become free states, and all territory south of that latitude would become slave states.
Missouri Compromise, 1820
Declared that Europe should not interfere in the affairs of the Western Hemisphere and that any attempt at interference by a European power would be seen as a threat to the U.S. It also declared that a New World colony which has gained independence may not be recolonized by Europe. (It was written at a time when many South American nations were gaining independence). Only England, in particular George Canning, supported the Monroe Doctrine. Mostly just a show of nationalism, the doctrine had no major impact until later in the 1800s.
Monroe Doctrine, 1823
charged high duties
Sectional Tariff, 1824
Popular vote: Jackson - 152,933 (42%), Adams - 115,626 (32%), Clay - 47,136 (13%), Crawford - 46,979 (13%). Electoral vote: Jackson - 99, Adams - 84, Crawford - 41, Clay - 37. House vote: Adams - 13, Jackson - 7, Crawford - 4, Clay - dropped. Jackson did not have a majority in the electoral vote, so the election went to the House of Representatives, where Adams won.
Favorite Sons Election, 1824