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13 Cards in this Set

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Oscar Montelius
typological method for the bronze age
historical particularism
attention to details of artifacts and other specific traits
Direct historical approach
early 20th century. involved historical particularism and developing chronological frameworks.
Environmental archaeology
1940s. Graham Clark of Britain, similar to Steward's cultural ecology.
The New Archeology
1960s. understand people- classifying has gone too far.
culture historical synthesis
used artifact classifications to develop regional culture histories. incl. AV Kidder and V Gordon Childe.
historical archaeology
seeks to understand the gaps between historical and archaeological records.
Midwestern taxonomic system
1930s. WC McKern's efforts to correlate culture histories of the midwest. hierarchy of terms of increasing generality.
Cultural ecology
Julian Steward, 1950s. study of culture change by means of environmental adaptation.
challenges to scientific archaeology
-tool of male capitalist domination
-no such thing as objective knowledge
Processual archaeology
result of new archeology. concerned with understanding culture change. used the scientific method and tested specific hypotheses.
Processual archaeology
result of new archeology. concerned with understanding culture change. used the scientific method and tested specific hypotheses.
interpretive archaeologies
post-processual; no one reading of the archaeological record can be judged more correct than another.