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25 Cards in this Set

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Describe the lateral, medial, anterior, posterior, and superior(roof) walls of the infratemporal fossa
lateral – ramus of mandible and zygomatic arch, medial - pterygoid process of sphenoid, lateral wall, nasopharynx and oropharynx, anterior - posterior maxilla, posterior - mastoid and styloid processes (muscles), superior - inferior aspect of greater wing of sphenoid, squamous/tympanic temporal bone
What are the four holes or fissures in the roof of the infratemporal fossa?
1- foramen ovale 2- foramen spinosum 3 - fissure b/w greater wing of sphenoid and petrous pyramid 4- transverse fissure w/in mandibular fossa
What goes through: 1-foramen ovale 2-foramen spinosum 3- fissure b/w greater wing of sphenoid and petrous pyramid 4-fissure w/in mandibular fossa
1-foramen ovale = MANDIBULAR V, 2-foramen spinosum = MIDDLE MENINGEAL ARTERY, 3- fissure b/w sphenoid and petrous = CARTILAGINOUS EUSTACHIAN TUBE, 4-medial side of mandibular fossal fissure = CHORDA TYMPANI
What attaches to the sphenoid spine in the roof of the infratemporal fossa?
THE SPHENOMANDIBULAR LIGAMENT
What structures does the mandibular foramen (lateral infratemporal fossa) permit into the mandibular canal?
INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVES AND VESSELS
In the lateral infratemporal fossa, on the medial internal surface of the ramus of the mandible, what structure inserts on the lingula?
THE SPHENOMANDIBULAR LIGAMENT
What constitutes the medial wall of the infratemporal fossa? What are its parts? What muscles attach to it??
THE PTERYGOID PROCESS, MEDIAL AND LATEAL PTERYGOID LAMINAE SEPARATED BY THE PTERYGOID FOSSA, ATTACHMENT POINT OF THE PTERYGOID MUSCLES
What structures enter the small apertures on the posterior aspect of the maxilla, the anterior wall of the infratemporal fossa?
POSTERIOR SUPERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVES, ENTERING THE MAXILLA TO INNERVATE THE POSTERIOR SUPERIOR TEETH
On the Anterior wall of the infratemporal fossa, what bones make the two fissures and what is their relationship to the pterygopalatine fossa?
the pterygomaxillary fissure is at the medial border of the posterior maxilla where it abuts the pterygoid process of the sphenoid bone, it leads to the pterygopalatine fossa...the inferior orbital fissure is between the superior posterior maxilla and the anterior margin of the greater wing of the sphenoid, it is just lateral to the palatine fossa
What enters the pterygomaxillary fissure and the infraorbital fissure on the anterior wall of the infratemporal fossa?
THE MAXILLARY ARTERY PASSES THROUGH THE PTERYGOPALATINE FISSURE ON ITS WAY TO THE PTERYGOPALATINE FOSSA, THE INFRAORBITAL FISSURE TRANSMITS 1 - THE MAXILLARY NERVE (V2) WITH ITS ZYGOMATIC BRANCH AND 2- THE INFRAORBITAL VESSELS
What are the two important extracapsular ligaments around the temporomandibular joint? Their origin and insertion?
1 - THE SPHENOMANDIBULAR LIGAMENT, FROM THE SPHENOID SPINE TO THE LINGULA, AND 2 - THE STYLOMANDIBULAR LIGAMENT, FROM THE STYLOID PROCESS TO THE LOWER POSTERIOR BORDER OF THE MANDIBULAR RAMUS
What important effect do the sphenomandibular ligament and stylomandibular ligament have on the jaw?
they transfer the axis of rotation from the mandibular condyle to the middle of the ramus of the mandible.
Name the four major muscles of mastication, describe their origin, insertion, function, and innervation
all innervated by mandibular V, 1 - masseter, origin -lower inner zygomatic arch, insertion - external surface of the ramus of the mandible, function - jaw closing...2 - temporalis, origin - temporal fossa, insertion - coronoid process of mandible, function - jaw closing...3 - medial pterygoid, origin - medial aspect of lateral pterygoid plate and the pterygoid fossa between the medial and lateral pterygoid plates, insertion - internal aspect of lower mandibular ramus, function - jaw closing, some lateral deviation...4 - lateral pterygoid, origin - inferior orbital fissure and lateral aspect of lateral pterygoid plate, insertion - neck of the mandible, function - jaw closer, lateral deviation
What are the two functional fiber types of Mandibular V?
SA, motor
What do the somatic afferent fibers of Mandibular V innervate?
sensory to its dermatomal distribution, mandibular teeth, anterior two-thirds of the tongue and mucous membrane of floor of mouth including lingual aspect of lower jaw gingiva
What do the motor fibers of Mandibular V innervate?
the four major muscles of mastication, tensor veli palatini, tensor tympani, mylohyoid, anterior belly of digastric
What is the path of Mandibular V from brainstem to its point of terminal division?
motor/SA root in Pons - trigeminal ganglion (division V1V2V3) - FORAMEN OVALE(V3) - division(V3 branches) plane b/w: lateral - lateral pterygoid muscle...medial - medial pterygoid muscle, tensor veli palatini, tensor tympani
Name the four sensory branches of Mandibular V
1-auriculotemporal 2-inferior alveolar 3-lingual 4-buccal (all irish-american lads bust)
Describe the course and innervation of the auriculotemporal nerve
1 - Arising from Mandibular V just below the foramen ovale, 2 - it emerges as two roots around the middle meningeal artery near the foramen spinosum. 3 - It then unites in front of this vessel, then 4 - accompanies the maxillary vessels deep to the mandible. 5 - it emerges at the upper pole of the parotid, and provides sensory innervation to the auricle, anterior external acoustic meatus, anterior external tympanic membrane, and the skin of the temporal region
Describe the course and innervation of the inferior alveolar nerve
1 - Arising from Mandibular V just below the foramen ovale, 2 - it enters the mandibular canal via the mandibular foramen to provide sensory innervation to the mandibular teeth. 2- it offers a mental branch to provide sensory innervation to the lower lip via the mental foramen. 3 - it offers small motor branches before entering the mandibular canal to the mylohyoid and anterior belly of the digastric muscles
Describe the course and innervation of the lingual nerve
1 - Arising from Mandibular V just below the foramen ovale, 2 - it is joined by the chorda tympani high in the infratemporal fossa 3- the chorda tympani then provides taste to the anterior two thirds of the tongue and parasympathetic to the submandibular and sublingual glands, 4- the lingual nerve itself contains SA general sensation to the anterior two thirds of the tongue, mucous membrane of the floor of the mouth, and the lingual aspect of the gingiva
Describe the course and innervation of the buccal nerve
1- Arising from Mandibular V just below the foramen ovale, 2 - it travels inferiorly forward, deep or through the insertion of the temporalis muscle 3- to provide sensory innervation to the full thickness of the cheek
What does the maxillary artery supply? What are its two major branches? Where do they go? What do they supply?
all of the muscles of mastication, 1 - the middle meningeal artery 2 - inferior alveolar artery, 1 - The middle meningeal travels deep to the lateral pterygoid and enters the foramen spinosum to supply the cranial meninges 2 - the inferior alveolar artery travels in company with the inferior alveolar nerve to supply the mandibular teeth and lower lip
The venous plexus around the pterygoid muscles recieves blood from what structures (venous and otherwise)? With what 3 other arteries does it communicate? Where does it drain?
it recieves blood from anything supplied by the maxillary artery, it communicates with 1-facial vein 2-orbital vein 3-cranial veins...it drains to the maxillary veins, which drain to the retromandibular vein, deeply posterior to the mandibular neck
The lymphatic network of the infratemporal fossa receives lymphatic drainage from? Drains to?
the nasopharynx, oropharynx, palatine tonsils, paranasal sinuses, upper teeth, and floor of the mouth ... drains to superior deep lateral cervical, retropharyngeal lymph nodes.