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59 Cards in this Set

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The ICS is comprised of the following five functional areas which are required to manage the resources at every incident. (A sixth area, Intelligence, may be established if required.)
1. Incident Commander
2. Operations Section
3. Planning Section
4. Logistics Section
5. Finance/AdministrationSection
The IC is responsible for the command of all incident activities within their span of control, including the development and implementation of
strategic goals and the incident action plan (IAP). The roles of Safety, Liaison, and Public Information shall remain a command function at all times
Within the ICS, the span of control of any individual with incident management supervisory responsibility should range from
three to seven subordinates, five being optimal
There are normally three positions in Command staff:
Safety Officer
PIO
Liason
The Section level is organizationally between the
Branch level and the IC
Operations, Planning, Logistics, and Finance/Administration are
Sections and are the IC's "General Staff" Not to be confused with "Command Staff"
The Liaison Officer is the point of contact for assisting and cooperating with other agencies (such as
Police, Red Cross, Public Works, etc
The Branch Level is organizationally between
Section and Division or Group
In most cases in building fires, it is not advised that Groups work in the same area when
Divisions are already operating
A Strike Team is comprised of a set number of the
same type single resources
A Task Force is a
combination of resources
Incident Command procedures shall be initiated and a command statement made when
three or more companies are investigating an incident or actively engaged in operational tasks.
Prior to assuming command, the following information should be obtained from the initial IC:
What was the situation?
 What is the current situation?
 What are the strategy and tactics?
 What units are committed and where?
 What units are available?
 Any obvious safety concerns
Staged units should reach the incident within
three minutes of receiving an assignment
the first engine company officer to arrive at the staging area shall
assume or assign the role of Staging Manager
Base is the location at which
the apparatus is parked
a Base Area Manager will be typically assigned at incidents that are large-scale and long-term. Base will also be established at structure fires where the staging area is located separate
from the apparatus, such as at a high-rise building or shopping mall fire.
The Staging Area Manager shall remain on the________Channel but also must monitor the ___________Channel
Command

Tactical
Units in Staging will remain on the __________ channel until deployed to operational areas
Command
Units coming out of Rehab will contact the
Staging Manager
The unit assigned as the RIT shall announce on the __________channel their arrival on the scene and confirm the assignment and location.
Tactical
The Medical Unit Leader is responsible for providing an organized response to the rehabilitation needs of the
personnel operating on an incident
Unit officers shall report to their designated supervisor when
Assignment is completed
 Unable to complete assignment
 There is a safety problem
 Additional resources are required to complete assignment
The four status conditions that shall be used to describe resources are
Assigned – performing active function
 Available – ready for assignment
 Out-of-service – not ready for assignment
 In transition from one location to another
During the Transition Mode a ____ ______ must be made prior to commencing to defensive operations
Par Check
The initial IC is responsible for performing the functions of command, which are
Arrive, assume, and announce command
 Evaluate situation (size-up)
 Communications
 Identify strategy, develop an action plan
 Deployment
 Organization
 Review, evaluate, and revise action plan
 Continue, transfer, and terminate command
Considerations and options for a 2nd Engine being assigned command are:
The experience of the crew
 The priorities of the incident
 Assist the officer with command post functions
 In the event the members are of equal rank and assigned to a task without the company officer, a crew leader must be appointed
 Assign the crew to the back-up line, place them under the supervisor of the initial attack line
If the second arriving engine arrives on the scene and it is unclear if command has been established, the officer shall
contact the Chief to clarify the command assignment
“risk benefit” analysis of all tasks to be accomplished on every incident include these considerations
Life Safety (First Priority) - Risk their lives in a calculated manner to save a life.
 Incident Control (Second Priority) - Place themselves in situations with moderate risk to save property.
 Property Conservation (Third Priority) - Risk nothing to try and save lives or property already lost.
The following actions establish the basic infrastructure for effective incident command as the incident progresses:
Voiced on-scene/situation report, which shall include a reconnaissance lap around the structure or a view of the rear whenever possible.
 Size-up and risk/benefit analysis.
 Formal announcement of the establishment of command.
 Identification of the overall strategy, mode of operation (offensive, defensive, etc.) and tactical assignment.
 Assessment and request of additional resources.
 Effective tracking of tactical assignments, units and personnel.
 Transfer of command upon the arrival of a ranking officer.
Voiced on-scene/situation report, which shall include a reconnaissance lap around the structure or a view of the rear whenever possible.
 Size-up and risk/benefit analysis.
 Formal announcement of the establishment of command.
 Identification of the overall strategy, mode of operation (offensive, defensive, etc.) and tactical assignment.
 Assessment and request of additional resources.
 Effective tracking of tactical assignments, units and personnel.
 Transfer of command upon the arrival of a ranking officer.
What is the problem?
 Where is the problem?
 If fire, where is the fire going?
 Who or what is in danger because of this incident?
 Safety considerations
 Additional resource needs
Voiced on-scene/situation report, which shall include a reconnaissance lap around the structure or a view of the rear whenever possible.
 Size-up and risk/benefit analysis.
 Formal announcement of the establishment of command.
 Identification of the overall strategy, mode of operation (offensive, defensive, etc.) and tactical assignment.
 Assessment and request of additional resources.
 Effective tracking of tactical assignments, units and personnel.
 Transfer of command upon the arrival of a ranking officer.
What is the problem?
 Where is the problem?
 If fire, where is the fire going?
 Who or what is in danger because of this incident?
 Safety considerations
 Additional resource needs
Based upon the initial size-up, the IC should set objectives at fires within the following areas:
Rescue
 Exposures
 Confinement
 Extinguishment
 Overhaul
 Ventilation and Salvage
Factors that affect establishing of objectives at mass casualty incidents would include:
Severity of Injuries
 Access to Victims
 Number of Victims
 Location
 Weather
 Accessibility to Scene
Elements of the On-Scene Report:
Water supply information when applicable
 Unit identification and location
 Description of the incident conditions including:
o Building height, occupancy type, and construction.
o Hazardous Materials event (to include staging position and Hot Zone)
o Multi-vehicle accident with number of vehicles
o Incident condition (e.g., fire showing from two windows on the first floor)
o What assignment your unit is taking
 Water supply
 Side Charlie
 1st due truck assignment
Example of an On-Scene Report:
“Engine 611 to Loudoun, Engine 611 is on the scene, Side Alpha, three-story garden apartment, wood-frame construction, with fire showing on the second floor. We laid a supply line from 201 N Furman Street.” We will be taking the first due engine assignment.
Elements of the initial Situation Report:
Size-up the situation.
 Describe the extent of the problem.
 Give a brief description of actions that you will be taking and orders for other units arriving on-scene if conditions require a change from the assignments outlined in the Firefighting and Emergency Operations Manuals and SOP’s.
 Initiate requests for additional resources or greater alarm as determined during the size-up.
 Announcement if command will be retained or transferred through the Chief.
Example of a Situation Report:
“Engine 611 Loudoun, we have fire from 3 windows on the second floor on the Bravo side. I’m establishing Sterling Boulevard Command. We will be advancing an attack line to the second floor with a crew of two. Transmit the 2nd alarm. Advise the Chief I need to transfer command.”
All progress reports shall be given on the
command channel once that channel is established.
The elements of the first progress report are
Contact controlling communications center
 Confirm the address or location of the incident
 Define commitment of resources
 Define the hazard
 Describe the building or involved area
 Define strategic mode
 Status of search
 Define extent of involvement or hazard
 Brief description of major tactical operations
 Describe the level of containment of the fire or hazard
 Describe the fireground layout or operational area
 Estimate time prediction for holding units
Example of an initial progress report:
“Duke Street Command to Alexandria. At 1203 Duke, all units are engaged from the first alarm for a fire on the third floor. Building is a four-story multiple dwelling, 50’ x 100’, of wood-frame construction. We are in an offensive strategy. Primary search is negative on fire floor and still underway on the floor above. Fire is on one floor with 25% involvement. We have three lines deployed and two in operation. Horizontal ventilation is underway. The fire has been contained, but not yet under control. Exposure Alpha is the street, Bravo is a similar building, Charlie a courtyard and Delta a three-story office. We will be holding all units in excess of an hour”.
Example of follow-up progress reports:
“Duke Street Command to Alexandria. We are continuing to use all units. Fire is still not under control but it is contained. Primary search is complete and negative. Continuing to hold all units for more than an hour”.
“Duke Street Command to Alexandria. Fire is under control. We are evaluating resource needs and will be releasing some units in the next 15 minutes”.
The phonetic alphabet used by communications centers and dispatchers are
Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliet, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.
The interior of the buildings shall be divided into quadrants A, B, C and D, starting at
the left front of the building
As floor 5 will be refered to as Division 5, Sub-floors will be designated as the
actual name of the sub-floor.
Examples: Basement, Mezzanine, P1, P2
Tactical commanders should make an effort to use as much _________communications with their unit officers as possible
face-to-face
The following actions set the basis for effective Incident Command as the incident progresses:
On scene report.
 Effective size-up and risk/benefit analysis.
 Provide situation report.
 Retention or transfer of command.
 Assessment and request of additional resources.
 Effective tracking of tactical assignments, units, and personnel.
 Prepare for transition of command
Upon the arrival of the dispatched command officer (usually a battalion chief), the following actions should be addressed:
Assessment of a suitable location to set up an incident command post.
 Obtain the following information from the original Incident Commander (IC):
o What was the situation?
o What is the current situation?
o What are the strategy and tactics?
o What units are committed and where?
o What units are available?
o Any obvious safety concerns
Park the command vehicle where it is visible and where it gives the best position to manage the incident. Remember to keep clear of incoming apparatus. A ____ ______of the incident site is extremely important.
Incident site
If the chief operates outside the vehicle, the IC shall ___ ___ ____ and set up at the rear of the vehicle.
don the IC vest
_____ _____is required to assist the IC in order to allow the IC to focus on the current strategy and implementation of the action plan
An aide
___ _____command aide may not be able to single-handedly manage all three of the primary responsibilities.
A single
Command Aide Duties are
Determine and track status of resources.
 Track units and members.
 Anticipate need for additional FD resources based upon assignments being made.
 Manage command channel communications.
 Provide progress reports.
 Monitor secondary tactical channels if utilized in the operation.
 Anticipate and recommend logistical needs to support the operation.
 Brief incoming chief officers as necessary.
The Command Aide has primary responsibility in support of the IC in three functional areas, or PRIMARY DUTIES
Resource Status
 Situation Status
 Command Post Communications
Incident time marker transmissions, requests for additional resources, progress reports, and other necessary communications are carried out on the
Command Channel
Radio designation for Command on Tactical Channel
Command
Radio designation for Command on the Command Channel
Geographic Location + Command
This channel must be continuously monitored at the command post.
The safety Channel "O"
The riding card is a duplicate of the
passport, kept in the officer's radio pocket.