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28 Cards in this Set

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  • Back
Synovial joint between the manubrium of the sternum ande medial end of the clavicle
Sternoclavicular Joint
the major parts of the scapula
acromion, coracoid process, inferior angle, spinous process and glenoid fossa
a synovial joint between the lateral end of the clavicle and the acromion of the scapula
acromioclavicular joint (AC)
the ligament that supports the acromioclavicular (ac) joint
coracoclavicular ligament
an injury to the fibrous capsule of the AC joint
shoulder separation
what is a grade 1 shoulder separation?
a simple sprain of the fibrous capsule of the AC joint
what is a grade 2 shoulder separation?
a subluxation(partial dislocation) of the AC joint
what is a grade 3 shoulder separation?
a dislocation of the AC joint, acticular surfaces of the joint lose all contact b/c of damage to the fibrous capsule and the coracoclavicular ligament
what are the major parts of the proximal end of the humerus?
head, greater and lesser tuberosities and surgical neck
what is the name of the synovial joint between the glenoid fossa of the scaupla and the head of the humerus?
the shoulder joint
what kind of configuration is the shoulder joint and what kind of movements does it provide for?
ball and socket. flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, abdction, and adduction of the arm.
what is a shoulder dislocation?
dislocation of the shoulder joint.
why is the shoulder joint subject to dislocation?
1. the small size of the glenoid fossa relative to the head of the humerus
2. the laxity of the inferior aspect of the capsule of the shoulder joint.
what is the major nerve most likely to be injured by a shoulder dislocation?
the axillary nerve.
what is the most commonly fractured bone?
the clavicle.
abduction and adduction of the arm involved the movements of which joints?
sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular and shoulder joints.
Describe Trapezius.
it can shrug the shoulder and is one of the two prime movers for lateral rotation of the scapula; it is innervated by the spinal part of the accessory nerve.
describe serratus anterior.
most powerful protractor of the shoulder and one of the two prime movers for lateral rotation of the scapula; innervated by the long thoracic nerver
what are the muscles of the rotator cuff?
supraspinaturs, infraspinatus, teres minor and subscapularis
what is the rold of the rotator cuff?
stabilze the shoulder joint by securely keeping the head of the humerus in close articulation with the glenoid fossa of the scapula
describe supraspinatus.
it initiates abduction of the arm from the anatomical positin and is innervated by the suprascapular nerver (c5 and c6)
describe infraspinatus.
rotates the arm externally and is innervated by the suprascapular nerver (c5 and c6)
describe teres minor.
rotates the arm exterally and is innervated by the axillary nerve (c5 and c6)
describe subscapularis.
rotates the arm internally and is innervated by the upper and lower subscapular nervers.
describe deltoid.
the most powerful abductor of the arm at the shoulder joint; it can also flex, extent, internally rotate and externally rotate the arm; innervated by the axillary nerver (c5 and c6)
what happens during arm abduction?
supraspinatus and deltoid abduct the arm at the shoulder joint and as trapezius and serratus anterior abduct the arm by laterally rotating the scapula
describe pectoralis major
it can flex and adduct the arm; it is innervated by the medial and lateral pectoral nerves
describe latissimus dorsi.
it can extend, adduct, and internally rotate the arm; it is innervated by the thracodorsal nerve.