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86 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
tyrant
An absolute ruler who governs without restrictions
republic
A political order in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them
comedy
A dramatic work that is light and often humorous or satirical in tone and that usually contains a happy resolution of the thematic conflict
democracy
Government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives.
patrician
A person of refined upbringing, manners, and tastes
phalanx
A formation of infantry carrying overlapping shields and long spears, developed by Philip II of Macedon and used by Alexander the Great
popular government
government run directly by the say of the people
metic
an alien who paid a fee to reside in an ancient Greek city
plebeian
Of or relating to the common people of ancient Rome
drama
A prose or verse composition, especially one telling a serious story, that is intended for representation by actors impersonating the characters and performing the dialogue and action
noble
Possessing hereditary rank in a political system or social class derived from a feudalistic stage of a country's development.
veto
The vested power or constitutional right of one branch or department of government to refuse approval of measures proposed by another department, especially the power of a chief executive to reject a bill passed by the legislature and thus prevent or delay its enactment into law.
rhetoric
The art or study of using language effectively and persuasively
indemnity
Compensation for damage, loss, or injury suffered
inflation
A persistent increase in the level of consumer prices or a persistent decline in the purchasing power of money
philosophy
Investigation of the nature, causes, or principles of reality, knowledge, or values, based on logical reasoning rather than empirical methods.
polis
A city-state of ancient Greece.
colonus
replaced slaves as workers that used land to farm and payed to use the land with crops
consul
Either of the two chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, elected for a term of one year.
aristocracy
Government by a ruling class.
patriarch
Used formerly as a title for the bishops of Rome, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Antioch, and Alexandria.
terracing
To form (a hillside or sloping lawn, for example) into terraces
anarchy
Absence of any form of political authority
orator
An eloquent and skilled public speaker.
myth
A traditional, typically ancient story dealing with supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes that serves as a fundamental type in the worldview of a people, as by explaining aspects of the natural world or delineating the psychology, customs, or ideals of society
checks and balances
a system in which no pawer of governemtn can overrun another in amount of power
phidias
Athenian sculptor who supervised work on the Parthenon. His statue of Zeus at Olympia was one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
cleopatra
Egyptian queen (51-49 and 48-30) noted for her beauty and charisma. Octavian defeated the forces led by Cleopatra and Mark Antony at Actium (31).
socrates
Greek philosopher whose indefatigable search for ethical knowledge challenged conventional mores and led to his trial and execution on charges of impiety and corrupting the youth
constantine
created new capital of byzantium
octavion
first emperor of rome
Virgil
author, aeneid
diocletian
reorganized administration
Romulus augustus
last emperor of the west
aristotle
Greek philosopher. A pupil of Plato, the tutor of Alexander the Great, and the author of works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, natural sciences, politics, and poetics, he profoundly influenced Western thought.
Marc Antony
fell in love with cleopatra
hippocrates
Greek physician who laid the foundations of scientific medicine by freeing medical study from the constraints of philosophical speculation and superstition
sulla
Roman general and dictator (82-79) who marched on Rome and seized power from his political rival Marius
archimedes
Greek mathematician, engineer, and physicist.
julius caesar
romes greatest military leader
euclid
Greek mathematician who applied the deductive principles of logic to geometry, thereby deriving statements from clearly defined axioms.
gracchus
two brothers who instituted Roman social reform
cynic
A member of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of achieving virtue.
stoic
A member of an originally Greek school of philosophy, founded by Zeno about 308 B.C., believing that God determined everything for the best and that virtue is sufficient for happiness. Its later Roman form advocated the calm acceptance of all occurrences as the unavoidable result of divine will or of the natural order.
epicureans
followers of Epicurus (who died at Athens B.C. 270), or adherents of the
Epicurean philosophy (Acts 17:18). This philosophy was a system of atheism, and
taught men to seek as their highest aim a pleasant and smooth life.
legion
The major unit of the Roman army consisting of 3,000 to 6,000 infantry troops and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.
column
A supporting pillar consisting of a base, a cylindrical shaft, and a capital
minoans
A native or inhabitant of ancient Crete.
persians
Of or relating to Persia or Iran, or to their peoples, languages, or cultures.
spartan
Of or relating to Sparta or its people
12 tables
Any collection and arrangement in a condensed form of many particulars or values, for ready reference, as of weights, measures, currency, specific gravities, etc
golden age
The first age of the world, an untroubled and prosperous era during which people lived in ideal happiness.
alexander the great
the king of Macedonia, the great conqueror;
helot
lowestclass of sparta, agricultural laboror
herodotus
father of history
hubris
assumption that a central character has the same knowledge or ability as the gods
plato
Greek philosopher wrote the republic
senate
most powerful
good emperors
1st- nerva, last aralius
greek art
glorified humans

pride in city states

greek ideals

combined beauty and usefulness
geography of balkan peninsula
between asia minor
assembly of tribes
elect tribunes, veto senate
assembly of centuries
declared war and peace, elected consuls
greek city states
1. small size
2. small pop.
3. polis
4. public meeting place
hellenize
to transform with greek culture
age of kings
a time when kings ruled
homer
wrote odyssey
pericles
Athenian leader noted for advancing democracy in Athens and for ordering the construction of the Parthenon
thucydides
Greek historian. Considered the greatest historian of antiquity, he wrote a critical history of the Peloponnesian War that contains the funeral oration of Pericles.
zeus
god of thunder
hellenistic age
postclassical Greek history and culture from the death of Alexander the Great to the accession of Augustus
antony and cleopatra
had a love affair formed an alliance
julius caesar
greatest military leader of rome
octavian
first emperor of rome
pax romana
roman peace
paterfamilias
A man who is the head of a household or the father of a family
ponifex maximus
high priest of state religion in early roman history
battle of plataea
479 bc when greek finally defeated persians
peloponnesian war
caused by economic and commercial conflict
punic wars
caused by conflict over control of meditteranean and rome
first triumvirate
julius caesar, pompey, crasius
second triumvirate
antony, octavian, lepidus
euripedes and sophocles
greek playrights
parthenon
The chief temple of the goddess Athena built on the acropolis at Athens between 447 and 432 B.C. and considered a supreme example of Doric architecture.
acropolis
The fortified height or citadel of an ancient Greek city
aratosthenes
calculated earths diameter