• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/151

Click to flip

151 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
What was the period of Reconstruction?
The period after the Civil War when the South was reorganized and reintegrated into the Union (1865-77)
carpetbagger
the white Northern Republican political appointees who came South,
scalawag
nickname for southern whites who supported Reconstruction following the Civil War
The Fourteenth Amendment
granted citizenship to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States,”
The Fifteenth Amendment
prohibits each government in the United States from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen's "race, color, or previous condition of servitude" (i.e., slavery).
The Black Codes
unofficial laws put in place in the United States to limit the basic human rights and civil liberties of blacks. - 1866
Freedmen's Bureau
The Bureau supervised all relief and educational activities relating to refugees and freedmen, including issuing rations, clothing and medicine.
What was President Johnson impeached for and how close was he to being found guilty?
Andrew Johnson, Democrat, was impeached in 1868 after violating the then-newly created Tenure of Office Act. President Johnson was acquitted by the Senate, falling one vote short of the necessary 2/3 needed to remove him from office, voting 35-19 to remove him.
What led to the end of Reconstruction?
Civil Rights Act of 1875 Rutherford B. Hayes inauguration as president marked the end of reconstruction (1877).
How did the U.S. government’s policy towards Native Americans change during the mid 1800’s?
In 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney expressed that since Native Americans were "free and independent people" that they could become U.S. citizens
The Black Codes
unofficial laws put in place in the United States to limit the basic human rights and civil liberties of blacks. - 1866
Freedmen's Bureau
The Bureau supervised all relief and educational activities relating to refugees and freedmen, including issuing rations, clothing and medicine.
What was President Johnson impeached for and how close was he to being found guilty?
Andrew Johnson, Democrat, was impeached in 1868 after violating the then-newly created Tenure of Office Act. President Johnson was acquitted by the Senate, falling one vote short of the necessary 2/3 needed to remove him from office, voting 35-19 to remove him.
What led to the end of Reconstruction?
Civil Rights Act of 1875 Rutherford B. Hayes inauguration as president marked the end of reconstruction (1877).
How did the U.S. government’s policy towards Native Americans change during the mid 1800’s?
In 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney expressed that since Native Americans were "free and independent people" that they could become U.S. citizens
What led to the end of Reconstruction?
Civil Rights Act of 1875 Rutherford B. Hayes inauguration as president marked the end of reconstruction (1877).
How did the U.S. government’s policy towards Native Americans change during the mid 1800’s?
Native Americans as American citizens In 1857, Chief Justice Roger B. Taney expressed that since Native Americans were "free and independent people" that they could become U.S. citizens.[72] Taney asserted that Native Americans could be naturalized and join the "political community" of the United States
What was the policy of Americanization?
The Americanization policies said that when indigenous people learned American customs and values they would soon merge tribal traditions with European-American culture and peacefully melt into the greater society.
What was the Homestead Act?
The Homestead Act is one of two United States federal laws that gave an applicant freehold title to up to 160 acres (65 hectares or one-fourth section) of undeveloped federal land west of the Mississippi River. The law required three steps: file an application, improve the land, and file for deed of title.
Why did the cattle drives start?
With the expansion of the meat packing industry, the demand for beef increased significantly. By 1866, cattle could be sold to northern markets for as much as $40 per head, making it potentially profitable for cattle, particularly from Texas, to be herded long distances to market
What was the Bessemer Process?
The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron. The process is named after its inventor, Henry Bessemer, who took out a patent on the process in 1855.
How did the transcontinental railroad get built?
Was a railroad line built between 1863 and 1869 by the Central Pacific Railroad of California and the Union Pacific Railroad that connected its statutory Eastern terminus at Council Bluffs, Iowa/Omaha, Nebraska[1][2] (via Ogden, Utah and Sacramento, California) with the Pacific Ocean at Oakland, California on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay opposite San Francisco.
Who and how was the concept of time zones developed?
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675 when the Royal Observatory was built as an aid to (English) mariners to determine longitude at sea. At the time, each town's local clock in the area was calibrated to its local noon. Therefore, each clock across England had a slightly different time. The first time zone in the world was established by British railway companies on December 1, 1847
Define laissez-faire?
the practice or doctrine of noninterference in the affairs of others, esp. with reference to individual conduct or freedom of action.
What was the Bessemer Process?
The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron. The process is named after its inventor, Henry Bessemer, who took out a patent on the process in 1855.
How did the transcontinental railroad get built?
Was a railroad line built between 1863 and 1869 by the Central Pacific Railroad of California and the Union Pacific Railroad that connected its statutory Eastern terminus at Council Bluffs, Iowa/Omaha, Nebraska[1][2] (via Ogden, Utah and Sacramento, California) with the Pacific Ocean at Oakland, California on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay opposite San Francisco.
Who and how was the concept of time zones developed?
Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) was established in 1675 when the Royal Observatory was built as an aid to (English) mariners to determine longitude at sea. At the time, each town's local clock in the area was calibrated to its local noon. Therefore, each clock across England had a slightly different time. The first time zone in the world was established by British railway companies on December 1, 1847
Define laissez-faire?
the practice or doctrine of noninterference in the affairs of others, esp. with reference to individual conduct or freedom of action.
When did the frontier close?
___
What is a monopoly and what act made it illegal?
a monopoly exists when a specific individual or an enterprise has sufficient control over a particular product or service to determine significantly the terms on which other individuals shall have access to it
The United States antitrust law is the body of laws that prohibits anti-competitive behavior (monopoly) and unfair business practices.
When violence broke out during labor strikes who was often blamed?
____
John Rockefeller,
John Davison Rockefeller I (July 8, 1839 – May 23, 1937) was an American oil magnate. Rockefeller revolutionized the petroleum industry and defined the structure of modern philanthropy.
Andrew Carnegie,
Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, businessman, entrepreneur and a major philanthropist.
Gustavus Swift,
Gustavus Franklin Swift (June 24, 1839 – March 29, 1903) founded a meat-packing empire in the Midwest during the late 19th century, over which he presided until his death. He is credited with the development of the first practical ice-cooled railroad car which allowed his company to ship dressed meats to all parts of the country and even abroad, which ushered in the "era of cheap beef."
Alexander Graham Bell,
Alexander Graham Bell (March 3, 1847 – August 2, 1922) was an eminent scientist, inventor, engineer and innovator who is credited with inventing the first practical telephone.
John Muir,
John Muir (21 April 1838 – 24 December 1914[1]) was a Scottish-born American naturalist, author, and early advocate of preservation of wilderness in the United States.
Eugene Debbs,
Eugene Victor Debs (November 5, 1855 – October 20, 1926) was an American union leader, one of the founding members of the International Labor Union and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), and several times the candidate of the Socialist Party of America for President of the United States
Thomas Edison,
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor, scientist, and businessman who developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and a long-lasting, practical electric light bulb.
George Eastman,
George Eastman (July 12, 1854 – March 14, 1932) founded the Eastman Kodak Company and invented roll film, helping to bring photography to the mainstream.
John Pierpont Morgan.
John Pierpont Morgan (April 17, 1837 - March 31, 1913) was an American financier, banker and art collector who dominated corporate finance and industrial consolidation during his time.
Where did many of the immigrants come from during the period of 1890-1910?
China
What were the names of the two largest immigration stations on the East and West coast?
Ellis Island in the New York Harbor was the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States as the site of the nation's busiest immigrant inspection station from 1892 to 1954. _____
Who were nativists?
The Nativists went public in 1854 when they formed the 'American Party', which was especially hostile to the immigration of Irish Catholics and campaigned for laws to require longer wait time between immigration and naturalization.
Rundown apartment buildings of this time were called what?
Tenements
What was the name of the coalition that included Alliance members, farmers, labor leaders, and reformers, was also known as the People’s Party?
The People's Party, also known as the "Populists", was a short-lived political party in the United States established in 1891.
A reform movement that arose to address many of the social problems that industrialization created was called what?
Progressivism - the movement in the late 1800s to increase democracy in america by curbing the power of the corporation. it fought to end corruption in government and business, and worked to bring equal rights of women and other groups that had been left behind during the industrial revolution.
What did progressives seek to improve?
The main goal of the Progressive movement was purification of government, as Progressives tried to expose and undercut political machines and bosses.
What was the tragedy known as the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, and how did it bring about reform?
The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire occurred in New York City on March 25, 1911. It is the worst industrial disaster in the history of the city. One hundred forty-eight died, mostly from jumping.
What was the tragedy known as the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, and how did it bring about reform?
The Triangle Shirtwaist Fire of 1911 would change the regulation by government of business. Before the fire government had mostly stayed away from business feeling it had no power to legislate it. After the fire government could not avoid instituting laws to protect the workers
In what area did Progressivism fail?
the imposition of Prohibition.
Journalist who “raked up” or exposed the filth of society were called what?
Muckrakers
Upton Sinclair,
exposed conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act.[
Ida Tarbell,
The History of the Standard Oil Company, published 1904. The exposé resulted in federal action and eventually in the breakup of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey under the 1911 Sherman Anti-Trust Act.
Lincoln Steffens?
He specialized in investigating government and political corruption
What was the NAACP and ADL?
The Anti-Defamation League (ADL)
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, (NAACP)
What two groups of laborers did Florence Kelly help?
A strong supporter of women's suffrage and African American civil rights
initiative,
provides a means by which a petition signed by a certain minimum number of registered voters can force a public vote (plebiscite) on a proposed statute, constitutional amendment, charter amendment or ordinance
referendum
A referendum (also known as a plebiscite or a ballot question) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal.
recall?
the act of removing an official by petition
What new opportunities became available for women during this period?
The right to vote (19th Amendment)
Who is considered to be the mother of the suffrage movement?
______
What were some anti-suffrage arguments?
the role played by men is different (and should be different) from that played by women.
It was a widely held that women tended to be temperamental and prone to outbursts of emotion
What two things happened that would eventually give women suffrage?
___
What was Theodore Roosevelt’s domestic policies called and why?
"Square Deal" between business and labor emphasizing that the average citizen would get a fair share under his policies.
What two things was Roosevelt most known for as far as a reformer?
trust busting and increased regulation of businesses.
Roosevelt’s foreign policy was called what?
The Monroe Doctrine
What positive things did Taft do as a Progressive President?
In his first and only term, President Taft's domestic agenda emphasized trust-busting, civil service reform, strengthening the Interstate Commerce Commission, improving the performance of the postal service, and passage of the Sixteenth Amendment. Abroad, Taft sought to further the economic development of undeveloped nations in Latin America and Asia through the method he termed "Dollar Diplomacy".
Why did many Progressive think Taft failed in the area of Progressivism?
________
What was Taft’s foreign policy called?
"Dollar Diplomacy"
What were Wilson’s domestic policies called?
democracy
What did Wilson do as a Progressive President?
He proved highly successful in leading a Democratic Congress to pass major legislation including the Federal Trade Commission and the Clayton Antitrust Act, which resolved the antitrust issue; the Underwood Tariff, which resolved the tariff issue; the Federal Farm Loan Act; and most notably the Federal Reserve System, which resolved the money issue in politics.
What was Wilson’s foreign policy called?
Wilsonianism
What led to the end of the Progressive era?
Our involvement in World War 1 put too much stress on the country. We entered in 1917 and the Progressive era was pretty much completely over by 1918.
What party did Roosevelt form?
The Progressive Party The party also became known as the Bull Moose Party
How was Wilson able to win the election?
Wilson was able to win reelection in 1916 by picking up many votes that had gone to Teddy Roosevelt or Eugene V. Debs in 1912
What is imperialism?
the creation and maintenance of an unequal economic, cultural and territorial relationship, usually between states and often in the form of an empire, based on domination and subordination."
Why did the U.S. get a late start in imperialism when compared to the countries of Europe?
_____
What were the four causes of U.S. imperialism discussed in class?
_____
In what three areas did the U.S. look to expand?
_____
Why was the U.S. so interested in China?
_____
What was the Great White Fleet and what was its purpose?
Theodore Roosevelt, always a great advocate of naval strength, sent a portion of the Atlantic fleet on a world cruise beginning in December 1907. Sixteen battleships, plus auxiliary support ships and 14,000 men, embarked on a 14-month, 45,000-mile voyage for the purposes of generating international goodwill, testing naval readiness and impressing world powers with American might.
Participating vessels were painted white, a matter of visual appeal and not of naval necessity.
What were the four causes that led to the U.S. declaring war on Spain?
____
What is yellow journalism?
The term "yellow journalism," which is frequently heard today when a newspaper overly sensationalizes a story,
When the war started where did the U.S. attack?
Guam
Who were the rough riders and buffalo soldiers, and what role did they play in the Spanish American war?
The "Rough Riders" was the name bestowed on the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry, one of three such regiments raised in 1898 for the Spanish-American War and the only one of the three to see action.
Who were the rough riders and buffalo soldiers, and what role did they play in the Spanish American war?
The Rough Riders were landed at Daiquiri, Cuba on June 22, and saw their first action in the Battle of Las Guasimas on June 24. The Rough Riders were part of the large American force that assembled for the assault on the Spanish fortifications protecting the city of Santiago.
Why was the Spanish American War called the “Splendid Little War”?
It only lasted four months
Why was a treatment of the Philippine people hypocritical?
____
What were the Teller Amendment and Foraker Act?
President McKinley called for war in April 1898. The passage of the Teller Amendment assured Americans that the war was not a war for the acquisition of Cuba.

The Foraker Act, officially the Organic Act of 1900, is a United States federal law that established civilian (limited popular) government on the island of Puerto Rico, which had been newly acquired by the United States as a result of the Spanish–American War.
What was the Roosevelt Corollary?
Convinced that all of Latin America was vulnerable to European attack, President Roosevelt dusted off the Monroe Doctrine and added his own corollary. While the Monroe Doctrine blocked further expansion of Europe in the Western Hemisphere, the Roosevelt Corollary went one step further. Should any Latin American nation engage in "chronic wrongdoing," a phrase that included large debts or civil unrest, the United States military would intervene.
What is the relationship between Puerto Rico and the U.S. today?
Puerto Rico is an unincorporated territory of the United States,
How did we acquire the rights to build the Panama Canal?
The United States also recognized Panama's independence. And, almost immediately, it started negotiations with the new government on a canal treaty.The two sides reached agreement quickly. The treaty was almost the same as the one the Colombian Senate had rejected earlier. This time, however, the canal zone would be 16 kilometers wide, instead of ten. And the United States would get permanent control of the canal zone.
The treaty was signed on November eighteenth, 1903.
What were the two major alliances before WWI began? Who were the members of these alliances?
The Triple Alliance (Italy, Germany, Austria-Hungary) and the Triple Entente (Russia, France, Britain)
What were the long term causes of WWI? (HINT: Think of M.A.I.N. and what it stands for)
Militarism
Alliances
Imperialism
Nationalism
What country saw itself as the protectorate of the Slavic nations (This is why they step in to protect Serbia from Austria-Hungary)
Russia
What does the term “self-determination” mean?
The right of nations to self-determination or in short form self determination is the principle in international law, that nations have the right to freely choose their sovereignty and international political status with no external compulsion or external interference.
What period of time (not a single date but a range) does the July Crisis refer to?
4th of July to August 1st
What was Germany’s “Blank Check” to Austria-Hungary? (What did they offer them?)
After Sarajevo, Count Leopold von Berchtold, the Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister, drew up a letter for the Emperor Francis Joseph to sign and send to Wilhelm II to try and convince both of Serbia's responsibility.
On July 6th, Wilhelm II and his Imperial Chancellor, Theobald von Bethmann-Hollweg, telegrammed Berchtold that Austria-Hungary could rely that Germany would support whatever action was necessary to deal with Serbia -- in effect offering von Berchtold a 'blank check.'
Why did Great Britain declare war on Germany?
Germany declares war on Russia (Aug. 1), on France (Aug. 3), invades Belgium (Aug. 4). Britain declares war on Germany (Aug. 4).
Describe the “ultimatum” that Austria-Hungary gave to Serbia. Why didn’t Serbia accept this ultimatum?
23 July: The Austro-Hungarian government sent Serbia an ultimatum containing ten really tough demands. Failure to meet all of these demands, they said, would result in war. (They expected Serbia to reject the ultimatum, which would give Austria-Hungary an excuse to invade.)
Why didn’t Serbia accept this ultimatum?
They rejected clause 6 of the ultimatum.
Why did Germany’s Schlieffen Plan call for the German army to attack France first and not Russia?
The Schlieffen Plan was the German General Staff's early 20th century overall strategic plan for victory in a possible future war where it might find itself fighting on two fronts: France to the west and Russia to the east. The First World War later became such a war with both a Western Front and an Eastern Front. The plan took advantage of expected differences in the three countries' speed in preparing for war.
Why did Germany’s Schlieffen Plan call for the German army to attack France first and not Russia?
In short, it was the German plan to avoid a two-front war by concentrating their troops in the west, quickly defeating the French and then, if necessary, rushing those troops by rail to the east to face the Russians before they had time to mobilize fully.
Which battle signaled the failure of the Schlieffen Plan?
Battle of the Marne (6 Sept. - 9 Sept. 1914)
What weapon was considered “uncivilized” and “controversial” before being used in WWI?
Land mine.
Who was the Red Baron (What side did he fight for? What was his name?)? Why was he considered the top fighter pilot in WWI?
Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen was a German fighter pilot with the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) during World War I. He is considered the ace-of-aces of that war, being officially credited with 80 air combat victories, more than any other pilot.
What is a Zeppelin? What type of military operations was it used for?
A Zeppelin is a type of rigid airship pioneered by the German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin in the early 20th century. After the outbreak of war, the German military made extensive use of Zeppelins as bombers and scouts.
What did Germany offer Mexico in the Zimmerman Note?
The Zimmermann Telegram (or Zimmermann Note) was a 1917 diplomatic proposal from the German Empire to Mexico to make war against the United States. The proposal was declined by Mexico, but angered Americans and led in part to a U.S. declaration of war in April.
What did German promise to do in the Sussex Pledge?
The Sussex pledge was a promise made in 1916 during World War I by Germany to the United States

The primary elements of this undertaking were:
Passenger ships would not be targeted;
Merchant ships would not be sunk until the presence of weapons had been established, if necessary by a search of the ship;
Merchant ships would not be sunk without provision for the safety of passengers and crew.
What was American’s greatest contribution to the war effort (soldiers or economic support?)
___
What condition was Germany in by the end of the war? (HINT: What state was the German economy in? What about the morale of the soldiers?)
___
Who was the commander of the American Expeditionary Forces?
American Expeditionary Force commanding general John J. Pershing
What year was the Armistice? What year was the Treaty of Versailles signed?
the armistice signed on 11 November 1918 ended the actual fighting, The Treaty of Versailles was one of the peace treaties at the end of World War I. It ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers. It was signed on 28 June 1919,
What were “Liberty Bonds”?
In 1917 and 1918, the United States government issued liberty bonds to raise money for its involvement in World War I.
What was the purpose of the National War Labor Board?
The National War Labor Board (NWLB) was a federal agency created in April 1918 by President Woodrow Wilson. It was composed of representatives from business and labor, and chaired by Former President William Howard Taft. Its purpose was to arbitrate disputes between workers and employers in order to ensure labor reliability and productivity during the war. It was disbanded after the war in May, 1919.
What future president was the head of the Food & Drug Administration?
____
What was the main goal of Wilson’s Fourteen Points?
In the late stages of the war, Wilson took personal control of negotiations with Germany, including the armistice. He issued his Fourteen Points, his view of a post-war world that could avoid another terrible conflict. He went to Paris in 1919 to create the League of Nations and shape the Treaty of Versailles, with special attention on creating new nations out of defunct empires.
What did Wilson think about giving German colonies the right of self-determination?
In favor
What parts of Wilson’s Fourteen Point Plan were included in the Treaty of Versailles?
Very little.
What did the Fourteen points declare that the foreign policy of a nation should be based upon?
____
What nation had to take full blame for the war under the “War Guilt Clause”?
Of the many provisions in the treaty, one of the most important and controversial required Germany to accept sole responsibility for causing the war and, under the terms of articles 231–248 (later known as the War Guilt clauses), to disarm, make substantial territorial concessions and pay heavy reparations to certain countries that had formed the Entente powers.
What was the main complaint that the “reservationists” had about the League of Nations?
____
Who were the members of “The Big Four”?
The Big Four consisted of Wilson, Britain's Prime Minister David Lloyd George, France's Premier Georges Clemenceau, and Italy's Premier Vittorio Orlando.
What are reparations?
Payments to countries because of the damages of war.
Did the United States ratify the treaty of Versailles?
No.
What was the National Origins Act?
A law that severely restricted immigration by establishing a system of national quotas that blatantly discriminated against immigrants from southern and eastern Europe and virtually excluded Asians. The policy stayed in effect until the 1960s.
What was the Sacco & Vanzetti trial (what did it focus on)?
Ferdinando Nicola Sacco (April 22, 1891–August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (June 11, 1888–August 23, 1927) were anarchists who were convicted of murdering two men during a 1920 armed robbery in South Braintree, Massachusetts. After a controversial trial and a series of appeals, the two Italian immigrants were executed on August 23, 1927
Why was labor weakened after World War I?
Union membership and activities fell sharply in the face of economic prosperity, a lack of leadership within the movement, and anti-union sentiments from both employers and the government.
Who was A. Mitchell Palmer? What did he do?
Alexander Mitchell Palmer (May 4, 1872 – May 11, 1936) was Attorney General of the United States from 1919 to 1921. He was nicknamed The Fighting Quaker and he directed the controversial Palmer Raids.

One of Palmer's first acts was to release 10,000 aliens of German ancestry who had been taken into government custody during World War I. He stopped accepting intelligence information gathered by the APL.
Who was W.E.B. Dubois? What did he believe in?
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced /duːˈbɔɪs/[1] February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an intellectual leader of the black community in America. In multiple roles as civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, sociologist, historian, author, and editor.

Equal rights for African Americans.
Why did African Americans migrate to the North in the 1920s?
The Great Migration was the movement of 2 million African Americans out of the Southern United States to the Midwest, Northeast and West from 1910 to 1930.[1] African Americans migrated to escape racism and to seek jobs in industrial cities.
What industries grew with the invention of the automobile?
Machining (Engines), tires, glass, leather, electrical fuel
What was the assembly line?
A long production line where a car would be built by workers doing the exact same job on each car. Time to build a car was greatly reduced.
What was Henry Ford’s goal in making the model T?
"I will build a car for the great multitude. It will be large enough for the family, but small enough for the individual to run and care for. It will be constructed of the best materials, by the best men to be hired, after the simplest designs that modern engineering can devise. But it will be so low in price that no man making a good salary will be unable to own one—and enjoy with his family the blessing of hours of pleasure in God's great open spaces
What did the census of 1920 show?
This was the first census that recorded a population exceeding 100 million.
What does the word “renaissance” mean?
Renaissance is French for rebirth.
How was Langston Hughes different than other Harlem Renaissance writers?
He gave african-american people hope and pride during the Harlem renaissance.
Why was disappointment a major theme of Harlem Renaissance writers?
Despite the increasing popularity of Negro culture, virulent white racism, often by more recent ethnic immigrants, continued to impact African-American communities, even in the North. After the end of World War I, many African American soldiers—who fought in segregated units like the Harlem Hellfighters—came home to a nation whose citizens often did not respect their accomplishments.
Why did many African Americans settle in Harlem?
The mass migration of blacks into the area began in 1904, due to another real estate crash, the worsening of conditions for blacks elsewhere in the city, and the leadership of a black real estate entrepreneur named Phillip Payton, Jr.
What event marked the end of the Harlem Renaissance?
The Harlem riot of 1935 was the final event which virtually severed the peaceful co-existence between the white Harlem shop owners and the black community.
What was The Jazz Singer?
The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical film. The first feature-length motion picture with synchronized dialogue sequences, its release heralded the commercial ascendance of the "talkies" and the decline of the silent film era.
What new technology helped create popular culture during the 1920s?
The radio.
Who was Charles Lindbergh?
Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974) Air Mail pilot, emerged from virtual obscurity to almost instantaneous world fame as the result of his Orteig Prize-winning solo non-stop flight on May 20–21, 1927, from Roosevelt Field[N 1] located in Garden City on New York's Long Island to Le Bourget Field in Paris, France, a distance of nearly 3,600 statute miles (5,800 km),[2] in the single-seat, single-engine monoplane Spirit of St. Louis.
Who was F. Scott Fitzrgerald?
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American author of novels and short stories, whose works are the paradigm writings of the Jazz Age, a term he coined himself. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century
Who was Louis Armstrong?
Louis Daniel Armstrong[1] (August 4, 1901 – July 6, 1971),[2] nicknamed Satchmo[3] or Pops, was an American jazz trumpeter and singer from New Orleans, Louisiana.
What silent film star was known as the “little tramp” because he dressed like a hobo?
Sir Charles Spencer "Charlie" Chaplin,
Who is Ernest Hemingway?
Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American author and journalist. His distinctive writing style, characterized by economy and understatement, influenced 20th-century fiction,
What was the Kellog-Briand Pact?
The Kellogg-Briand Pact, also known as the Pact of Paris after the city where it was signed on August 27, 1928, was an international treaty "providing for the renunciation of war as an instrument of national policy." It failed in its purpose but was significant for later developments in international law. It was named after the American secretary of state Frank B. Kellogg and French foreign minister Aristide Briand, who drafted the pact.
What did Calvin Coolidge do concerning Native Americans?
___
What was the Teapot Dome Scandal?
The Teapot Dome Scandal was an unprecedented bribery scandal and investigation during the White House administration of United States President Warren G. Harding.
What was Harding’s presidential campaign slogan?
Return to normalcy