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52 Cards in this Set

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Sentence that present its centeral meaning in a main clause at the end; adds emphasis and structural variety.
Periodic Sentence
Serious talk, speech, or lecture involving MORAL or SPIRITUAL advice between them; it can explain something unfamiliar by associating it with pointing out its similarity to something more familiar.
Homily
Similarity or comparison between two different things or the relationship between them; it can explain something unfamiliar by associating it with pointing out its simarity to something more familiar.
Analogy
The use of slang or informalities in speech or writing.
Colloquialism
The way an author chooses to join words into phrases, clauses, and sentences
Syntax
The word, phrase, or clause referred to by a pronoun.
Antecedent
This term describes traditions for each genre
Generic Conventions
To draw a reasonable conclusion from the information presented.
Infer
Type of sentence in which the main ideas comes first, followed by dependent grammatical units such as phrases and clauses.
Loose Scentence
Using character and/or story elements symbolically to represent an adstraction in addition to the literal meaning; the meaning usually deals with a moral truth or a generalization about human existance
Allegory
Word or phrase that links different ideas.
Transition
Work that closely imitates the style or content of another with the specific aim of commic effect or ridicule; SNL.
Parody
Work that target human vices and follies, or social institutions and conventions, for reform or ridicule.
Satire
Writing or speech that is not intended to carry literal meaning.
Figurative Language
Statement that appears to be self-contradictory or opposed to common sense, but upon closer inspection conatins some degree of truth or validity.
Paradox
Terse statement of know authorship which express a general truth or moral principle; can be used a memorable summation of the author's point.
Aphorism
The centeral idea or message of a work, the insight it offers into life.
Theme
The duplication, either exact or approximate, of any element of language, such as a sound, word, phrase, clause, sentence or pattern.
Repetition
The emotional mood created by the entirety of a literary work, established partly by SETTING and partly by the author's CHOICE OF OBJECTS that are described; frequently foreshadowed events.
Atmosphere
The major category in which a literary work fits
Genre
The multiple meanings, either intentional or unintentional, of a word, phrase, scentence, or passage.
Ambiguity
The nonliteral, associative meaning of a word.
Connotative
The primary aim of this writing is teaching or instructing, especially morals or ethical principles.
Didactic
The repetition of sounds, especially initial consonant sounds in two or more neighboring words; used to reinforce meaning, unify ideas, and/or supply musical sound.
Alliteration
The scentence or group of sentences that directly expresses the author's opinion, purpose, meaning, or proposition.
Thesis
The strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word.
Denotation
Figure of speech where the author groups apparently contadictory terms to suggest a paradox; jumbo shrimp
Oxymoron
Figure of speech which the name of one object is substituted for that of another closely associated with it.
Menonomy
Grammatical unit that conatins both a subject and a verb.
Clause
Intellectually amusing language that surprises and delights.
Wit
Invloves bitter, caustic language that is meant to hurt or ridicule someone or something.
Sarcasm
Ironic minimalizing of fact, it presents something as less significant than it is.
Understatement
More agreeable or less offensive substitute for generally unpleasant words or concepts.
Euphemism
Refers to the gammatical or rhetorical framing of words, phrases, scentences or paragraphs to give structural similarity; it was the best of times, it was the worst of times.
Parallelism
Related to style, this refers to the writer's WORD CHOICE, especially with regard to their correctness, clearness, or effectiveness.
Diction
An adjective that describes words, phrases, or general tone that is overly scholary, academtic, or bookish.
Pedantic
An evaluation of the sum of the choices an author makes in blending diction, syntax figurative language, and other literature devices.
Style
An explicit comparison, normally using like, as or if.
Simile
Anything that represents or stands for something else.
Symbol
Comparison developed at great length.
Extended Metaphor
Contast between what is stated explicitly and what is really ment.
Irony
Deductive system of formal logic that presents two premises-the first one called "major" and the second one "minor" that inevitable lead to a sound conclusion.
Syllogism
Discussion that appeals to emotion rather than reason, to feeling rather than intellect.
Ad Hominem Argument
Emotionally violent, verbal denunciation or attack using strong, abusive language.
Invective
Fanciful expression, utilizing an extended metaphor or analogy between seemingly dissimilar objects; intellectual clever due to unusual comparison.
Conceit
Figure of speech in which natural sounds are imitated in the sound of words.
Onomatopeia
Figure of speech in which the author presents or describes concepts, animals, or inanimate objects with human attributes or emotions.
Personification
Figure of speech that directly addresses an absent or imaginary person or personified abstraction, such as liberty or love.
Apostrophe
Figure of speech using deliberate exaggeration or overstatement; comic effect
Hyperbole
Figure of speech using implied comparison of seemingly unlike things or the substitution of one for the other, suggesting similarity.
Metaphor
Sensory details used to describe, arouse emotion, or represent abstractions.
Imagery
Direct or indirect reference to something which is presumably commonly known. such as an event, book, myth, place or work of art.
Allusion