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19 Cards in this Set

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city-state, in ancient Greece, Italy, and Medieval Europe, an independent political unit consisting of a city and surrounding countryside.
Euripides , 480 or 485–406 B.C., Greek tragic dramatist, ranking with Aeschylus and Sophocles. Born in Attica, he lived in Athens most of his life, though he spent much time on Salamis. He died in Macedonia, at the court of King Archelaus. He wrote perhaps 92 plays
an ancient Greek city-state.
Athens , Gr. Athínai, city (1991 pop. 2,907,179; 1991 urban agglomeration pop. 3,072,922), capital of Greece, E central Greece, on the plain of Attica, between the Kifisós and Ilissus rivers, near the Saronic Gulf. Mt. Aigáleos (1,534 ft/468 m), Mt. Parnis (4,633 ft/1,412 m), Mt. Pendelikón (3,638 ft/1,109 m), and Mt. Hymettus (3,370 ft/1,027 m) rise in a semicircle around the city. The capital of Attica prefecture, Athens is Greece's largest city and its administrative, economic, and cultural center.
democracy [Gr.,=rule of the people], term originating in ancient Greece to designate a government where the people share in directing the activities of the state, as distinct from governments controlled by a single class, select group, or autocrat.
city of ancient Greece, capital of Laconia, on the Eurotas (Evrótas) River in the Peloponnesus.
oligarchy [Gr.,=rule by the few], rule by a few members of a community or group. When referring to governments, the classical definition of oligarchy, as given for example by Aristotle, is of government by a few, usually the rich, for their own advantage
1. arbitrary or unrestrained exercise of power; despotic abuse of authority.
. an assembly, esp. the popular assembly of ancient Athens.
1. a person who offers views or theories on profound questions in ethics, metaphysics, logic, and other related fields.
Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea, Gr. Aigaion Pelagos, Turkish Ege Denizi, arm of the Mediterranean Sea, c.400 mi (640 km) long and 200 mi (320 km) wide, off SE Europe between Greece and Turkey; Crete and Rhodes mark its southern limit.
c.500–c.432 B.C., Greek sculptor, one of the greatest sculptors of ancient Greece.
Pericles , c.495–429 B.C., Athenian statesman. He was a member of the Alcmaeonidae family through his mother, a niece of Cleisthenes. He first came to prominence as an opponent of the Areopagus (462) and as one of the prosecutors of Cimon, whom he replaced in influence
Socrates , 469–399 B.C., Greek philosopher of Athens. Famous for his view of philosophy as a pursuit proper and necessary to all intelligent men, he is one of the great examples of a man who lived by his principles even though they ultimately cost him his life.
Aristotle , 384–322 B.C., Greek philosopher, b. Stagira. He is sometimes called the Stagirite. Aristotle placed great emphasis in his school on direct observation of nature, and in science he taught that theory must follow fact
Plato , 427?–347 B.C., Greek philosopher. Plato's teachings have been among the most influential in the history of Western civilization.. His goal was to show the rational relationship between the soul, the state, and the cosmos.
Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great or Alexander III,356–323 B.C., king of Macedon, conqueror of much of Asia.
Aeschylus , 525–456 B.C., Athenian tragic dramatist, b. Eleusis. The first of the three great Greek writers of tragedy, Aeschylus was the predecessor of Sophocles and Euripides.
Sophocles , c.496 B.C.–406 B.C., Greek tragic dramatist, younger contemporary of Aeschylus and older contemporary of Euripides,