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21 Cards in this Set

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Tragedy
sad, emotional story, usually a myth
tragic hero
the protagonist, a noble man with noble intentions, suffers from hamartia, has an epiphany, has an anagnorisis and is destroyed
hamartia
a fatal, tragic flaw
epiphany
sudden moment when you finally get something. the "ahha" moment
anagnorisis
moment when you recognize your error, usually it is already too late to fix it. the "oops!" moment
peripetia
turning point where fourtunes turn- usually from good to bad
theatron
where the spectators sit. the "sitting place"
orchestra
place where the chorus is. the "dancing place"
parados
enterence to the stage where the chorus parades in
skene
dressing rooms behind the stage. the back wall of the dressing rooms is the scenery for the stage
proscenium
the front section of the stage where if you were to bring in a curtain it would still be in front
prologue
exposition, where the background information is given to the spectators
parados
when the chorus enters. the parados are the transitions between episodes
stasimon
the choral ode that is chanted between episodes
exodus
when everybody leaves the stage; the end or conclusion of the play
allusion
making reference to something outside the play. often they made reference to the myths. everyone knew what they were talking about in the allusion. the myths were well known.
catharsis
perging of emotions by the end of the play. the people get caught up in the play and using their emotions it teaches a lesson
chorus
part of the play. started as 50 men and by Shakespere there was only 1 man as the chorus
myth
legend, a story involving gods, demigods, animals and man; was to explain the unexplainable at that time
episodes
the scenes in ancient Greek drama
hubris
excessive pride