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92 Cards in this Set

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dupe
To deceive; A person who is easily deceived

Bugs Bunny was able to DUPE Elmer Fudd by dressing up as a lady rabbit.
ecletic
Selecting from or made up from a variety of sources

Budapest's architecture is an ECLETIC mix of eastern and western sytles.
efficacy
Effectiveness

The EFFICACY of penicillin was unsurpassed when it was first introduced; the drug completely eliminated almost all bacterial infections for which it was administered.
elegy
A sorrowful poem or speech

Although Thomas Gray's "ELEGY Written in a Country Chuchyard" is about death and loss, it urges its readers to endure this life, and to trust in spirituality.
eloquent
Persuasive and moving, especially in speech

The Gettysburg Address is moving not only because of its lofty sentiments but also because of it ELOQUENT words.
emulate
To copy; to try to equal or excel

The graduate student sought to EMULATE his professor in every way, copying not only how she taught, but also how she conducted herself outside of class.
enervate
To reduce in strength

The guerrillas hoped that a series of surprise attacks would ENERVATE the regular army.
enigma
A puzzle; a mystery

Speaking in riddles and dressed in old robes, the artist gained a reputation as something of an ENIGMA
enumerate
To count, list, or itemize

Moses returned from the mountain with tablets on which the commandments were ENUMERATED
equivocate
To use expressions of double meaning in order to mislead.

When faced with criticism of his policies, the politician EQUIVOCATED and left all parties thinking he agreed with them.
erratic
Wandering and unpredictable

The plot seemed predictable until it suddenly took a series of ERRATIC turns that surprised the audience.
esoteric
Known or understood by only a few

Only a handful of experts are knowledgeable about the ESOTERIC world of particle physics.
estimable
Admirable

Most people consider it ESTIMABLE that Mother Teresa spent her life helping the poor of India.
euphenism
Use of an inoffensive word or phrase in place of a more distasteful one.

The funeral director preferred to use the EUPHENISM "sleeping" instead of the word "dead".
exacerbate
To make worse

It is unwise to take aspirin to try to relieve heartburn; instead of providing relief, the drug will only EXACERBATE the problem.
exculpate
To clear from blame; prove innocent

The adversarial legal system is intended to convict those who are guilty and to EXCULPATE those who are innocent.
exigent
Urgent; Requiring Immediate Action

The patient was losing blood so rapidly that it was EXIGENT to stop the source of the bleeding.
exonerate
To clear of blame

The fugitive was EXONERATED when another criminal confessed to committing the crime.
explicit
Clearly stated or shown; forthright in expression

The owners of the house left a list of EXPLICIT instructions detailing their house-sitters' duties, including a schedule for watering the house plants.
fanatical
Acting excessively enthusiastic; filled with extreme, unquestioned devotion

The stormtroopers were FANATICAL in their devotions to the Emperor, readily sacrificing their lives for him.
Fawn
To grovel

The understudy FAWNED over the director in hopes of being cast in the part on a permanent basis.
Florid
Excessively decorated or embellished

The palace had been decorated in an excessively FLORID style; every surface had been carved and gilded.
Foment
To arouse or incite

The protesters tried to FOMENT feeling against the war through their speeches and demonstrations.
Frugality
A tendency to be thrifty or cheap

Scrooge McDuck's FRUGALITY was so great that he acculmulated enough wealth to fill a giant storehouse with money.
Gregarious
Outgoing, Sociable

She was so GREGARIOUS that when she found herself alone she felt quite sad.
Guile
Deceit or trickery

Since he was not fast enough to catch the roadrunner on foot, the coyote resorted to GUILE in an effort to trap his enemy.
Gullible
Easily deceived

The con man pretended to be a bank officer so as to fool GULLIBLE bank customers into giving him their account information.
Homogenous
Of a similar kind

The class was fairly HOMOGENOUS, since almost all of the students were senior journalism majors.
Iconoclast
One who opposes established beliefs, customs, and institutions

His lack of regard for traditional beliefs soon established him as an ICONOCLAST
Imperturbable
Not capable of being disturbed

The counselor had so much experience dealing with distraught children that she seemed IMPERTURB
ABLE, even when faced with the wildest tantrums.
Impervious
Impossible to penetrate; incapable of being affected

A good raincoat will be IMPERVIOUS to moisture.
Impetuous
Quick to act without thinking

It is not good for an investment broker to be IMPETUOUS, since much thought should be give to all the possible options.
Implacable
Unable to be calmed down or made peaceful

His rage at the betrayal was so great that he remained IMPLACABLE for weeks.
Inchoate
Not fully formed; disorganized

The ideas expressed in Nietzsche's mature work also appear in an INCHOATE form in his earliest writing.
Inimical
Hostile; unfriendly

Even though the children had grown up together they were INIMICAL to each other at school.
Innocuous
Harmless

Some snakes are poisonous, but most species are INNOCUOUS and pose no danger to humans.
Insipid
Lacking interest or flavor

The critic claimed that the painting was INSIPID, containing no interesting qualities at all.
Inundate
To overwhelm; to cover with water

The tidal wave INUNDATED Atlantis, which was lost beneath the water.
Irascible
Easily made angry

Attila the Hun's IRASCIBLE and violent nature made all who dealt with him fear for their lives.
Lament
To express sorrow; to grieve

The children continued to LAMENT the death of the goldfish weeks after its demise.
Lavish
To give unsparingly (Verb);Extremely generous or extravagant (Adjective)

She LAVISHED the puppy with so many treats that it soon became overweight and spoiled.
Lethargic
Acting in an indifferent or slow, sluggish manner

The clerk was so LETHARGIC that, even when the store was slow, he always had a long line in front of him.
Luminous
Bright, brilliant, glowing

The park was bathed in LUMINOUS sunshine which warmed the bodies and the souls of the visitors.
Malinger
To evade responsibility by pretending to be ill

A common way to avoid the draft was by MALINGERING- pretending to be mentally or physically ill so as to avoid being taken by the Army.
Malleable
Capable of being shaped

Gold is the most MALLEABLE of precious metals; it can easily be formed into almost any shape.
Metaphor
A figure of speech comparing two different things; A symbol

The METAPHOR "a sea of troubles" suggests a lot of troubles by comparing their number to the vastness of the sea.
Meticulous
Extremely careful about details

To find all the clues at the crime scene, the investigators METICULOUSLY exmained every inch of the area.
Mitigate
To soften; to lessen

A judge may MITIGATE a sentence is she decides that a person committed a crime out of need.
Mollify
To calm or make less severe

Their argument was so intense that it was difficult to believe any compromise would MOLLIFY them.
Monotony
Lack of variation

The MONOTONY of the sound of the dripping faucet almost drove the research assistant crazy.
Naive
Lacking sophistication or experience

Having never traveled before, the hillbillies were more NAIVE than the people they met in Beverly Hills.
Obsequious
Overly submissive and eager to please

The OBSEQUIOUS new associate made sure to compliment her supervisor's tie and agree with him on every issue
Obstinate
Stubborn, unyielding

The OBSTINATE child could not be made to eat any food that he disliked.
Obviate
To prevent; to make unnecessary

The river was shallow enough to wade across at many points, which OBVIATED the need for a bridge.
Occlude
To stop up; to prevent the passage of

A shadow is thrown across the Earth's surface during a solar eclipse, when the light from the sun is OCCLUDED by the moon.
Onerous
Troublesome and oppressive; burdensome

The assignment was so extensive and difficult to manage that it proved ONEROUS to the team in charge of it.
Opprobium
Public disgrace

After the scheme to embezzle the elderly was made public, the treasurer resigned in utter OPPROBIUM.
Paradox
A contradiction or dilemma

It is a PARADOX that those most in need of medical attention are often those least able to obtain it.
Perfidious
Willing to betray one's trust

The actress's PERFIDIOUS companion revealed all of her intimate secrets to the gossip columnist.
Perfunctory
Done in a routine way; indifferent

The machinelike bank teller processed the transaction and gave the waiting customer a PERFUNCTORY smile.
Permeate
To Penetrate

This miraculous new cleaning fluid is able to PERMEATE stains and dissolve them in minutes!
Plastic
Able to be molded, altered, or bent

The new material was very PLASTIC and could be formed into products of vastly different shape.
Plethora
Excess

Assuming that more was better, the defendant offered the judge a PLETHORA of excuses.
Pragmatic
Practical as opposed to idealistic

While daydreaming gamblers think they can get rich by frequenting casinos, PRAGMATIC gamblers realize that the odds are heavily stacked against them.
Pristine
Fresh and clean; uncorrupted

Since concerted measures had been taken to prevent looting, the archeological site was still PRISTINE when researchers arrived.
Proliferate
To increase in number quickly

Although he only kept two guinea pigs initially, they PROLIFERATED to such an extent that he soon had dozens.
Propitiate
To conciliate; to appease

The management PROPITIATED the irate union by agreeing to raise wages for its member.
Propriety
Correct behavior; obedience to rules and customs

The aristocracy maintained a high level of PROPRIETY, adhering to even the most minor social rules.
Prudence
Wisdom, caution, or restraint

The college sutdent exhibited PRUDENCE by obtaining practical experience along with her studies, which greatly strengthened her resume.
Pungent
Sharp and irritating to the senses

The smoke from the burning tires was extremely PUNGENT.
Quiescent
Motionless

Many animals are QUIESCENT over the winter months, minimizing activity in order to conserve energy.
Rarefy
To make thinner or sparser

Since the atmosphere RAREFIES as altitudes increase, the air at the top of very tall mountains is too thin to breathe.
Repudiate
To reject the validily of

The old woman's claim that she was Russian royalty was REPUDIATED when DNA test showed she was of no relation to them.
Reticent
Silent, reserved

Physically small and RETICENT in her speech, Joan Didion often went unnoticed by those upon whom she was reporting.
Rhetoric
Effective writing or speaking

Lincoln's talent for RHETORIC was evident in his beautifully expressed Gettysburg Address.
Satiate
To satisfy fully or overindulge

His desire for power was so great that nothing less than complete control of the country could SATIATE it.
Soporific
Causing sleep or lethargy

The movie proved to be so SOPORIFIC that soon loud snores were heard throughout the theater.
Specious
Deceptively attractive;seemingly plausible but fallacious

The student's SPECIOUS excuse for being late sounded legitimate, but was proved otherwise when his teacher called his home.
Stigma
A mark of shame or discredit

In The Scarlet Letter, Hester Prynne was required to wear the letter "A" on her clothes as a public STIGMA for her adultery.
Stolid
Unemotional, lacking sensitivity

The prisoner appeared STOLID and unaffected by the judge's harsh sentence.
Sublime
Lofty or grand

The music was so SUBLIME that it transformed the erude surroundings into a special place.
Tacit
Done without using words

Although not a word had been said, everyone in the room knew that a TACIT agreement had been made about which course of action to take.
Taciturn
Silent, not talkative

The clerk's TACITURN nature earned him the nickname "Silent BOb".
Tirade
Long, harsh speech or verbal attack

Observers were shocked at the manager's TIRADE over such a minor mistake
Torpor
Extreme mental and physical sluggishness

After surgery, the patient experienced TORPOR until the anesthesia wore off.
Transitory
Temporary, lasting a brief time

The reporter lived a TRANSITORY life, staying in one place only long enough to cover the current story.
Vacillate
To sway physically;to be indecisive

The customer held up the line as he VACILLATED between ordering chocolate chip or rocky road ice cream.
Veracity
Filled with truth and accuracy

She had a reputation for VERACITY, so everyone trusted her description of events.
Verbose
Wordy

The professor's answer was so VERBOSE that his student forgot what the original question had been
Vex
To annoy

The old man who loved his peace and quiet was VEXED by his neighbor's loud music.
Volatile
Easily aroused or changeable; lively or explosive

His VOLATILE personality made it difficult to predict his reaction to anything.
Whimsical
Acting in a fanciful or capricious manner; unpredictable

The ballet was WHIMSICAL< delighting the children with its imaginative characters and unpredictable sets.