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172 Cards in this Set

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seamy
unwholesome, sordid

from: the inside of a garment

antonym: salubrious
welter
noun

a confused mass; a jumble or muddle: a welter of anxious faces

antonym: calm
vituperative
vituperate: to use or address with harsh or abusive language; reviling, abusive

complimentary
viable
practical, workable, capable of living

from: Latin vita, life
veracious
truthful
venerate
to regard with respect, to revere
truculent
fierce; cruel; savagely brutal

from: Latin trux, savage

"truculent criticism"
substantiate
established by evidence, supported
striated
marked with bands
stolid
not easily stirred or moved mentally; unemotional; dull, impassive.

"Republicans hailed Kemp as a quick-tongued charmer who would . . . appear in attractive contrast to the stolid Al Gore."
to stint
to be frugal; get along on a scanty allowance

"Don't stint on the food. They stinted for years in order to save money."
specious
apparently good or right though lacking real merit; superficially pleasing or plausible; pleasing to the eye but deceptive

from: Latin specere, to look
soporific
causing or tending to cause sleep.

"soporific speech"
solicitus
1. anxious or concerned (usually fol. by about, for, etc., or a clause): "solicitous about a person's health."
2. anxiously desirous: "solicitous of the esteem of others."
3. eager (usually fol. by an infinitive): "He was always solicitous to please."
4. careful or particular: "a solicitous housekeeper"

from: Latin sollus, whole, entire
to secrete
second def:
to place out of sight; hide; conceal: "squirrels secreting nuts in a hollow tree trunk."

in this sense, from: Latin secretus, secret
to satiate
1. To satisfy (an appetite or desire) fully.
2. To satisfy to excess.

from: Latin sat-, enough
to sanction
1. to authorize, approve, or allow: an expression now sanctioned by
2. to impose a sanction on; penalize, esp. by way of discipline
salubrious
healthful

from: Latin salus, health

antonym: ~seamy
reticent
1. disposed to be silent or not to speak freely; reserved.
2. reluctant or restrained.

from: Latin tacere, to be silent

antonym: loquacious, garrulous
repudiate
to reject, to disown

from: Latin repudiare, to reject, refuse
reprobate
–noun
1. a depraved, unprincipled, or wicked person: a drunken reprobate.
2. a person rejected by God and beyond hope of salvation.
–adjective
3. morally depraved; unprincipled; bad.
4. rejected by God and beyond hope of salvation.
relegate
to send or consign to an inferior position, place, or condition
refractory
1. Stubbornly disobedient; unmanageable.
2. Resisting ordinary treatment or cure.
3. Difficult to melt or work; capable of enduring high temperature.
recondite
dealing with very profound, difficult, or abstruse subject matter

from: Latin recondere, to hide

antonym: exoteric
rarified
having low density "light headed from the rarified mountain air"

reserved for an elite group
quiescent
being at rest; quiet; still; inactive or motionless: "a quiescent mind"
proscribe
1. to ostracize
2. to denounce or condemn (a thing) as dangerous or harmful; prohibit.

antonym: prescribe
propitiate
to conciliate (an offended power); appease: "propitiate the gods with a sacrifice."
conciliate
to overcome the distrust or hostility of; placate; win over: "to conciliate an angry competitor."
prodigal
wastefully or recklessly extravagant: "prodigal expenditure."
probity
integrity and uprightness; honesty
pristine
1. having its original purity; uncorrupted or unsullied.
2. of or pertaining to the earliest period or state; primitive
prevaricate
to speak falsely or misleadingly; deliberately misstate or create an incorrect impression; lie.

from Latin praevaricari, to straddle (the division between two positions)
precipitate
9. rushing headlong or rapidly onward.
10. proceeding rapidly or with great haste: a precipitate retreat.
11. exceedingly sudden or abrupt: a precipitate stop; a precipitate decision.
12. done or made without sufficient deliberation; overhasty; rash: a precipitate marriage.

from Latin praeceps, steep
pragmatic
of or pertaining to a practical point of view or practical considerations.
placate
to appease or pacify, esp. by concessions or conciliatory gestures: to placate an outraged citizenry.

syn: propitiate
plegmatic
1. not easily excited to action or display of emotion; apathetic; sluggish.
2. self-possessed, calm, or composed.
petulant
easily irritated or annoyed
pervasive
to become spread throughout all parts of: "Spring pervaded the air," "the pervasive odor of garlic"
perfunctory
1. performed merely as a routine duty; hasty and superficial: perfunctory courtesy.
2. lacking interest, care, or enthusiasm; indifferent or apathetic: In his lectures he reveals himself to be merely a perfunctory speaker.

syn: cursory
cursory
going rapidly over something, without noticing details; hasty; superficial: a cursory glance at a newspaper article.
perfidious
deliberately faithless; treacherous; deceitful: "a perfidious lover."
perennial
something that recurs every year, or something that lasts throughout the year, or something that lasts indefinitely
penury
extreme poverty; destitution.
penchant
a strong inclination, taste, or liking for something: "a penchant for outdoor sports."

syn: propensity
pathological
pertaining to disease
opprobrium
1. Disgrace; infamy; reproach mingled with contempt.
2. A cause or object of reproach or disgrace.
officious
objectionably aggressive in offering one's unrequested and unwanted services, help, or advice; meddlesome: "an officious person."
prodigious
Impressively great in size, force, or extent; enormous: a prodigious storm.

from Latin prodigum, omen
occlude
to close, shut, or stop up

from Latin claudere, to close
obviate
to anticipate; to prevent by interception; to dispose of or make unnecessary.

"On the positive side, a flood of cheap imports could help hold down inflation and obviate the need for higher interest rates."
obsequious
characterized by or showing servile complaisance or deference; fawning
obsurate (noun/adj)
unmoved by persuasion, pity, or tender feelings; stubborn; unyielding.

"an obdurate sinner"

syn: ~reprobate
neophyte
novice
mollify
to soften in feeling or temper, as a person; pacify; appease.

syn: propitiate, placate
mitigate
1. to lessen in force or intensity, as wrath, grief, harshness, or pain; moderate.
2. to make less severe: to mitigate a punishment.
maverick
a lone dissenter

from texas rancher, Samuel Maverick, who left his calves unbranded
malinger (n. malingerer)
to pretend illness, esp. in order to shirk one's duty, avoid work, etc
levity
1. Lightness of manner or speech, especially when inappropriate; frivolity.
2. Inconstancy; changeableness.
latent
present but not visible, apparent, or actualized; existing as potential: latent ability.

from Latin latere, to lie hidden
lassitude
1. weariness of body or mind from strain, oppressive climate, etc.; lack of energy; listlessness; languor.
2. a condition of indolent indifference: the pleasant lassitude of the warm summer afternoon.
indolence
having or showing a disposition to avoid exertion; slothful: an indolent person.

from Latin in-dolens, dolere, to be painful, to be in pain
irascible
easily provoked to anger; very irritable
invective`
vehement or violent denunciation, censure, or reproach.
inveigh
to protest strongly or attack vehemently with words; rail (usually fol. by against): to inveigh against isolationism.
intransigent
refusing to agree or compromise; uncompromising; inflexible.
intractable
not easily controlled or directed; not docile or manageable; stubborn; obstinate: an intractable disposition.

from Latin trahere, to drag
insipid
1. without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2. without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup
innocuous
not harmful or injurious
insensible
any number of things:
unresponsive to feeling;
imperceptible;
not making sense
abscond
to depart clandestinely; to steal off and hide

(verb)
aberrant
deviating from the norm

(adjective)
aberration
something deviating from the norm

(noun)
alacrity
eager and enthusiastic willingness

(noun)
approbation
an expression of approval or praise

(noun)
assuage
to ease or lessen; to appease or pacify

(verb)
capricious
inclined to change one's mind impulsively; erratic, unpredictable

(adjective)
chicanery
trickery or subterfuge

(noun)
subterfuge
a (deceptive) artifice or expedient used to evade a rule, escape a consequence, hide something, etc.

(noun)
disabuse
to free (a person) from deception or error.

(verb)
effrontery
extreme boldness; presumptuousness

(noun)
enervate
to weaken, to reduce in vitality

(verb)
equivocate
to use ambiguous language with a deceptive intent

(verb)
equivocal
1. allowing the possibility of several different meanings, as a word or phrase, esp. with intent to deceive or misguide; susceptible of double interpretation; deliberately ambiguous: an equivocal answer.

2. of doubtful nature or character; questionable; dubious; suspicious: aliens of equivocal loyalty.

3. of uncertain significance; not determined: an equivocal attitude.
exigent
urgent, pressing; requiring immediate action or attention

(adjective)
extemporaneous
improvised; done without preparation

(adjective)
filibuster
intentional obstruction, especially using prolonged speechmaking to delay legislative action

(noun)
fulminate
to loudly attack or denounce

(verb)
ingenuous
artless; frank and candid; naive, lacking in sophistication or worldliness

1. characterized by an inability to mask your feelings; not devious; "an ingenuous admission of responsibility" [ant: artful]
2. lacking in sophistication or worldliness; "a child's innocent stare"; "his ingenuous explanation that he would not have burned the church if he had not thought the bishop was in it" [syn: innocent]
inured
accustomed to accepting something undesirable

"Though the food became no more palatable, he soon became sufficiently inured to it" (John Barth).
irascible
easily angered; prone to temperamental outbursts

(adjective)
mundane
of the world; typical or of concerned with the ordinary

(adjective)
nebulous
vague, cloudy, lacking clearly defined form

(adjective)
noxious
harmful, injurious

(akin to nocére to do harm, inflict injury; see innocent) + -ius -ious]

(adjective)
obtuse
lacking sharpness of intellect

(adjective)
obviate
To prevent by interception; to anticipate and dispose of or make unnecessary.

After lunch he packed and stepped into the shower: Ronald Rosenthal spent a good portion of his life in planes and he knew that hot water immediately before and after a flight obviated most of its bad effects.
-- Neil Gordon, The Gun Runner's Daughter
onerous
troubling, burdensome
paean
a song or hymn of praise and thanksgiving
perennial
recurrent through the year or many years; happening repeatedly

1. lasting for an indefinitely long time; enduring: her perennial beauty.
2. (of plants) having a life cycle lasting more than two years.
3. lasting or continuing throughout the entire year, as a stream.
4. perpetual; everlasting; continuing; recurrent.
perfidy
intentional breach of faith; treachery

(noun)
perfidious
deliberately faithless; treacherous; deceitful: a perfidious lover.


[Origin: 1590–1600; < L perfidiōsus faithless, dishonest. See perfidy, -ous]
perfunctory
cursory; done without care or interest

1. performed merely as a routine duty; hasty and superficial: perfunctory courtesy.
2. lacking interest, care, or enthusiasm; indifferent or apathetic: In his lectures he reveals himself to be merely a perfunctory speaker.
perspicacious
acutely perceptive; having keen discernment

(adjective)
perspicacity
1. keenness of mental perception and understanding; discernment; penetration.
2. Archaic: keen vision.
precipitate (adjective)
8. headlong: a precipitate fall down the stairs.
9. rushing headlong or rapidly onward.
10. proceeding rapidly or with great haste: a precipitate retreat.
11. exceedingly sudden or abrupt: a precipitate stop; a precipitate decision.
12. done or made without sufficient deliberation; overhasty; rash: a precipitate marriage.
precipitate (verb)
1. to hasten the occurrence of; bring about prematurely, hastily, or suddenly: to precipitate an international crisis.
2. to cast down headlong; fling or hurl down.
3. to cast, plunge, or send, esp. violently or abruptly: He precipitated himself into the struggle.
predilection
a disposition in favor of something; preference
prescience
foreknowledge of events; knowing of events before their occuring

(noun)
prevaricate
to deliberately avoid the truth; to mislead

To stray from or evade the truth; equivocate. See Synonyms at lie2.
qualms
misgivings; reservations; causes for hesitancy

(noun)
relegate
to forcibly assign, especially to a lower place or position

(verb)
reticent
quiet; reserved; reluctant to express thoughts or feelings

(adjective)
solicitous
1. anxious or concerned (usually fol. by about, for, etc., or a clause): solicitous about a person's health.
2. anxiously desirous: solicitous of the esteem of others.
3. eager (usually fol. by an infinitive): He was always solicitous to please.
4. careful or particular: a solicitous housekeeper.
sordid
characterized by filth, grime, or squalor; foul
stupefy
to stun, baffle, or amaze
stymie
to block; thwart
torque
a force that causes rotation
tortuous
winding, twisting; excessively complicated
truculent
fierce and cruel; eager to fight

1. fierce; cruel; savagely brutal.
2. brutally harsh; vitriolic; scathing: his truculent criticism of her work.
3. aggressively hostile; belligerent.
virulent
extremely harmful or poisonous; bitterly hostile or antagonistic
accolade
an expression of praise

(noun)
adulation
to show excessive admiration or devotion to; flatter or admire servilely.

c.1380, from O.Fr. adulacion, from L. adulationem (nom. adulatio), from aduliari "to flatter," from ad- "to" + ulos "tail," from PIE *ul- "the tail" (cf. Skt. valah "tail," Lith. valai "horsehair of the tail"). The original notion is "to wag the tail" like a fawning dog (cf. Gk. sainein "to wag the tail," also "to flatter;" see also wheedle).
ameliorate
to make better or more tolerable

(verb)
avarice
greed, especially for wealth
avaricious
greedy, especially for wealth
axiom
a universally recognized principle
burgeon
to grow rapidly or flourish
bucolic
rustic and pastoral; characteristic of rural areas and their inhabitants

(adjective)
canon
an established set of principles or code of laws, often religious in nature
caustic
burning or stinging; causing corrosion

(adjective)
chary
1. cautious or careful; wary: He was chary of investing in oil wells.
2. shy; timid.
3. fastidious; choosy: She is excessively chary about her friends.
4. sparing (often fol. by of): chary of his praise.

(adjective)
cogent
appealing forcibly to the mind or reason; convincing

(adjective)
complaisance
the willingness to comply with the wishes of others

(noun)
complaisant
willing to comply with the wishes of others
contentious
argumentative; quarrelsome; causing controversy or disagreement
contrite
1. caused by or showing sincere remorse.
2. filled with a sense of guilt and the desire for atonement; penitent: a contrite sinner.

(adjective)
demur
1. To object; to take exception.
2. To delay.

(verb)
didactic
intended to teach or instruct

(adjective)
discretion
cautious reserve in speech;

also

ability to make responsible decisions
ebullience
the quality of lively or enthusiastic expression of thoughts and feelings
elegy
a mournful poem, especially one lamenting for the dead
emollient
smooth, especially to the skin; making less harsh; mollifying; an agent that softens or smoothes the skin
enigmatic
mysterious; obscure; difficult to understand
ephemeral
brief; fleeting
ethereal
1. Characterized by lightness and insubstantiality; intangible.
2. Highly refined; delicate. See Synonyms at airy.
3.
1. Of the celestial spheres; heavenly.
2. Not of this world; spiritual.
4. Chemistry Of or relating to ether.
esoteric
intended for or understood by a small specific group
eulogy
a speech honoring the dead

(Cf. elegy = a *pooem* honoring the dead)
exonerate
to remove blame
facetious
playful, humorous, witty
furtive
marked by stealth; covery; surreptitious
harangue
to deliver a pompous speech or tirade; a long pompous speech

(verb/noun)
impecunious
lacking funds; without money

(adjective)
incipient
beginning to come into being or to become apparent

E.g.: detecting incipient tumors; an incipient personnel problem.

(adjective)
innocuous
harmless; causing no damage
intransigent
refusing to compromise
inveigle
to obtain by deception or flattery

(verb)
morose
sad; sullen; melancholy
odious
evoking intense aversion or dislike
penurious
penny-pinching; excessively thrifty; ungenerous
pernicious
extremely harmful
peruse
to examine with great care
perusal
a careful examination
preen
to dress up, to primp, to groom oneself with elaborate care
prodigious
abundant size, force, or extent; extraordinary
quaff
to drink deeply
quiescence
stillness; motionlessness; quality of being at rest

'a quiescent mind'
redoubtable
awe-inspiring; worthy of honor and respect

"the redoubtable Nikita Khrushchev."
sanction
2 meanings:
authoritative permission of approval; a penalty intended to enforce compliance; to give permission or authority to
torpid
lethargic; sluggish; dormant
torpor
1. sluggish inactivity or inertia.
2. lethargic indifference; apathy.
3. a state of suspended physical powers and activities.
4. dormancy, as of a hibernating animal.
urbane
sophisticated; refined; elegant
vilify
to defame; to characterize harshly