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40 Cards in this Set

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transmute
\trans-MYOOT; tranz-\, transitive verb:
To change from one nature, form, substance, or state into another; to transform.

intransitive verb:
To undergo transmutation.

[I]t now seems as if she no longer had the strength or will to transmute life into art.
--Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, "Changes Not for the Better," New York Times, February 28, 1974

Sand that once was rock becomes rock once again as it slowly sediments and compresses into layers of sandstone, which, in turn, transmute into sand.
--Lena Lencek and Gideon Bosker, The Beach: The History of Paradise on Earth
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Transmute is from Latin transmutare, "to change utterly," from trans-, "across" + mutare, "to change
galumph
\guh-LUHM(P)F\, intransitive verb:
To move in a clumsy manner or with a heavy tread.

Then he climbed up the little iron ladder that led to the wharf's cap, placed me once more upon his shoulders and galumphed off again.
--Alistair MacLeod, Island: The Complete Stories

Lizards patrol the . . . landscape, and giant tortoises galumph on the beaches.
--Peter M. Nichols, "Galápagos," New York Times, March 30, 2001
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Galumph is probably an alteration of gallop. It was coined by Lewis Carroll in the nonsense poem "Jabberwocky."
emolument
n.: The profit arising from office, employment, or labor; gain; compensation; advantage; perquisites, fees, or salary
palindrome
n.: a word or phrase that reads the same backward as forward

A few examples:

* "Madam, I'm Adam." (Adam's first words to Eve?)
* "A man, a plan, a canal--Panama!" (The history of the Panama Canal in brief)
* "Able was I ere I saw Elba." (Napoleon's lament)
* Mom, Dad
deprecate
v. 1: to disapprove of strongly; deplore 2: belittle; "The teacher should not deprecate his student's efforts"
3 archaic: To pray against, as an evil; to seek to avert by prayer
bivouac
n. 1: The watch of a whole army by night, when in danger of surprise or attack
2: An encampment for the night usually without tents or covering. --v.i.; BIVOUACKED; BIVOUACKING: To encamp for the night under little or no shelter.
umbrage
n.: suspicion of injury or wrong; offense; resentment
incipient
adj.: Beginning to be, or to show itself; commencing; initial; as, the incipient stage of a fever; incipient light of day
dapple
1 dapple (DAP-uhl), n.: A small contrasting spot or blotch

2 dapple, adj.: Marked with spots of different shades of color; spotted; variegated; as, a dapple horse. Note: The word is used in composition to denote that some color is variegated or marked with spots; as, dapple-bay; dapple-gray.

3 dapple, v.t.: To variegate with spots; to spot.
pugnacious
adj.: Disposed to fight; inclined to fighting; quarrelsome; fighting.
capitulate
v.: to surrender under agreed conditions
susurrus
n.: The act of whispering; a whisper; a murmur; a rustling
thaumaturgy
The act or art of performing something wonderful; magic; legerdemain
capacious
adj.: Having capacity; able to contain much; large; roomy; spacious; extended; broad; as, a capacious vessel, room, bay, or harbor.
glower
v. i.: to stare angrily or with a scowl.
canorous
adj.: Melodious; musical
effulgence
noun: The state of being effulgent; extreme brilliancy; a flood of light; great luster or brightness; splendor.
assuage
verb:
To soften; to allay, mitigate, ease, or lessen, as heat, pain, or grief; to appease or pacify, as passion or tumult.
repast
noun:
1. Something taken as food; a meal; figuratively, any refreshment.
2. The act of taking food.
spoonerism
noun:
The transposition of usually initial sounds in a pair of words
Some examples:

* "We all know what it is to have a half-warmed fish ['half-formed wish'] inside us."
* "The Lord is a shoving leopard ['loving shepherd']."
* "It is kisstomary to cuss ['customary to kiss'] the bride."
* "Is the bean dizzy ['dean busy']?"
* "When the boys come back from France, we'll have the hags flung out ['flags hung out']!"
* "Let me sew you to your sheet ['show you to your seat']."
tenebrous
adjective: Dark; gloomy; dusky
nescience
noun: Lack of knowledge; ignorance
gewgaw
noun: A showy trifle; a toy; a splendid plaything; a pretty but worthless bauble.
exiguity
noun: Scantiness; smallness; thinness;the quality of being meager. --EXIGUOUS, adjective
seriatim
adverb and adjective:
in a series; one after another
tmesis
noun: in grammar and rhetoric, the separation of the parts of a compound word, now generally done for humorous effect; for example, what place soever instead of whatsoever place, or abso-bloody-lutely.

"In two words, im possible." --Samuel Goldwyn
chthonic
adjective:
dwelling in or under the earth; also, pertaining to the underworld
objurgate
verb:
1: express strong disapproval of;
2: censure severely
plethora
noun:
1. Overfullness; especially, excessive fullness of the blood vessels; repletion; that state of the blood vessels or of the system when the blood exceeds a healthy standard in quantity; hyperæmia; -- opposed to anæmia.
2. State of being overfull; excess; superabundance.
lissom (or lissome)
adjective:
1. Limber; supple; flexible; lithe; lithesome
2. Light; nimble; active
badinage
noun: playful raillery; banter
propitious
presenting favorable circumstances; as, a propitious season; a propitious breeze, a propitious sign, propitious omens
inclement
physically severe or harsh (esp. said of the weather)
kobold
a kind of domestic spirit in German mythology
knell
the stoke of a bell tolled at a funeral
cogent
Having the power to compel conviction or move the will; constraining; conclusive; forcible; powerful; not easily resisted
regale
to entertain with something that delights
mordant
biting; caustic; sarcastic; keen; severe
agog
in eager desire; eager; highly excited
captious
Apt to catch at faults; disposed to find fault or to cavil; eager to object; difficult to please.