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55 Cards in this Set

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abrogate
1 : to abolish by authoritative action : ANNUL
2 : to treat as nonexistent <abrogating their responsibilities>
synonym see NULLIFY
explicate
1 : to give a detailed explanation of
2 : to develop the implications of : analyze logically
synonym see EXPLAIN
countermand
1 : to revoke (a command) by a contrary order
2 : to recall or order back by a superseding contrary order <countermand reinforcements>
bellicose
favoring or inclined to start quarrels or wars; BELLIGERENT

Function: adjective
re·past (n)
1 : something taken as food : MEAL
2 : the act or time of taking food

from Latin pascere
vainglorious
Function: adjective

marked by vainglory; BOASTFUL
espouse
to take up and support as a cause : become attached to

synonym see ADOPT
penury
Function: noun

1 : a cramping and oppressive lack of resources (as money); especially : severe poverty
2 : extreme and often niggardly frugality
enervate
Function: adjective

lacking physical, mental, or moral vigor
nu·ga·to·ry
1 : of little or no consequence : TRIFLING, INCONSEQUENTIAL
2 : having no force : INOPERATIVE

Function: adjective
Latin nugatorius, from nugari to trifle
el·ee·mo·sy·nary
of, relating to, or supported by charity
ap·o·plec·tic
1 : of, relating to, or causing stroke
2 : affected with, inclined to, or showing symptoms of stroke
3 : of a kind to cause or apparently cause stroke <an apoplectic rage>; also : greatly agitated
ca·pa·cious
containing or capable of containing a great deal; spacious
hal·cy·on (adj)
1 : of or relating to the halcyon or its nesting period
2 a : CALM, PEACEFUL b : HAPPY, GOLDEN c : PROSPEROUS, AFFLUENT
pal·li·ate
transitive verb

abate
en·gen·der
Function: verb

1 : BEGET, PROCREATE
2 : to cause to exist or to develop : PRODUCE
ten·e·brous
1 : shut off from the light : DARK, MURKY
2 : hard to understand : OBSCURE
3 : causing gloom

function: adjective
Latin tenebrosus, from tenebrae
ca·no·rous
pleasant sounding; melodious

Function: adjective
Latin canorus, from canor melody, from canere to sing
as·suage
1 : to lessen the intensity of (something that pains or distresses) : EASE
2 : PACIFY, QUIET

Function: transitive verb
from (assumed) Vulgar Latin assuaviare, from Latin ad- + suavis sweet
ef·ful·gence
radiant splendor; brilliance

Function: noun
Late Latin effulgentia; to shine forth
ful·gent
dazzlingly bright : RADIANT

Function: adjective
from Latin fulgent-, fulgens, present participle of fulgEre to shine; akin to Latin flagrare to burn
um·brage
3 a : an indistinct indication : vague suggestion : HINT b : a reason for doubt : SUSPICION
4 : a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult <took umbrage at the speaker's remarks>

Function: noun
pug·na·cious
having a quarrelsome or combative nature : TRUCULENT, BELLIGERENT

Function: adjective
Latin pugnac-, pugnax, from pugnare to fight
tru·cu·lent
1 : feeling or displaying ferocity : CRUEL, SAVAGE
2 : DEADLY, DESTRUCTIVE

Function: adjective
Latin truculentus, from truc-, trux savage
vit·ri·ol
something felt to resemble vitriol especially in caustic quality; especially : virulence of feeling or of speech

Function: noun
ADJ = vitriolic
Latin vitriolum, neuter of vitreolus glassy, from Latin vitreus vitreous
su·sur·rus
a whispering or rustling sound

Function: noun
ne·science
lack of knowledge or awareness : IGNORANCE

Function: noun
Adj: nescient
Late Latin nescientia,present participle of nescire not to know
qui·es·cent
1 : marked by inactivity or repose : tranquilly at rest
2 : causing no trouble or symptoms

Function: adjective
Latin quiescent-, quiescens, quiescere to become quiet, rest
de·cry
1 : to depreciate (as a coin) officially or publicly
2 : to express strong disapproval of

Function: transitive verb
French décrier, from Old French descrier, from des- de- + crier to cry
iras·ci·ble
marked by hot temper and easily provoked anger

Function: adjective
Middle French, from Late Latin irascibilis, from Latin irasci to become angry
per·fid·i·ous
faithless

Function: adjective
Latin perfidia, from perfidus faithless
per·fi·dy
1 : the quality or state of being faithless or disloyal : TREACHERY
2 : an act or an instance of disloyalty

Latin perfidia, from perfidus faithless
mis·an·thrope
a person who hates or distrusts mankind

Function: noun
Etymology: Greek misanthrOpos hating mankind, from misein to hate + anthrOpos human being
cur·mud·geon
a crusty, ill-tempered, and usually old man

Function: noun
Etymology: origin unknown
xe·no·phobe
one unduly fearful of what is foreign and especially of people of foreign origin

Function: noun
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary
rel·e·gate
1 : to send into exile : BANISH
2 : ASSIGN: as a : to assign to a place of insignificance or of oblivion : put out of sight or mind

Function: transitive verb
Etymology: Latin relegatus, from re- + legare to send with a commission
mi·na·to·ry
having a menacing quality : THREATENING

Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin minatorius, from Latin minari to threaten
pre·var·i·cate
to deviate from the truth : EQUIVOCATE

Function: intransitive verb
Etymology: Latin praevaricatus, to act in collusion, literally, to straddle, from prae- + varicare to straddle, from varus bowlegged
equiv·o·cate
1 : to use equivocal language especially with intent to deceive
2 : to avoid committing oneself in what one says

Function: intransitive verb
equiv·o·cal
1 a : subject to two or more interpretations and usually used to mislead or confuse b : uncertain as an indication or sign
2 a : of uncertain nature or classification

Function: adjective
Etymology: Late Latin aequivocus, from aequi- equi- + voc-, vox voice
bom·bast
pretentious inflated speech or writing

Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English bombast cotton padding, alteration of Latin bombyc-, bombyx silkworm, silk, from Greek bombyk-, bombyx
di·as·po·ra
the breaking up and scattering of a people : MIGRATION

Function: noun
Etymology: Greek, dispersion, from diaspeirein to scatter, from dia- + speirein to sow
per·ni·cious
highly injurious or destructive : DEADLY

Function: adjective
from Latin perniciosus, from pernicies destruction, from per- + nec-, nex violent death
ig·no·ble
1 : of low birth or common origin : PLEBEIAN
2 : characterized by baseness, lowness, or meanness

Function: adjective
Etymology: from in- + Old Latin gnobilis noble
vi·tu·per·a·tive
uttering or given to censure : containing or characterized by verbal abuse

Function: adjective
fer·vid
1 : very hot : BURNING
2 : marked by often extreme fervor

Etymology: Latin fervidus, from fervEre
tor·pid
1 a : having lost motion or the power of exertion or feeling : DORMANT, NUMB b : sluggish in functioning or acting
2 : lacking in energy or vigor
tur·gid
1 : being in a state of distension : SWOLLEN, TUMID
2 : excessively embellished in style or language : BOMBASTIC, POMPOUS

Etymology: Latin turgidus, from turgEre to be swollen
tur·bid
1 a : thick or opaque with or as if with roiled sediment b : heavy with smoke or mist
2 a : deficient in clarity or purity : FOUL, MUDDY
b : characterized by or producing obscurity (as of mind or emotions)

Etymology: Latin turbidus confused, turbid, from turba confusion, crowd
tu·mid
1 : marked by swelling : SWOLLEN, ENLARGED
2 : PROTUBERANT, BULGING
3 : BOMBASTIC, TURGID
in·ure
transitive senses : to accustom to accept something undesirable
intransitive senses : to become of advantage

from Latin opera=work
in·urn
1 : ENTOMB
2 : to place (as cremated remains) in an urn
lap·i·dary
1 : having the elegance and precision associated with inscriptions on monumental stone
2 a : sculptured in or engraved on stone

Etymology: Latin lapidarius of stone, from lapid-, lapis stone
ser·a·phim
an order of angels

Late Latin seraphim, plural, seraphs, from Hebrew serAphIm
lu·gu·bri·ous
1 : MOURNFUL; especially : exaggeratedly or affectedly mournful
2 : DISMAL

Etymology: Latin lugubris, from lugEre to mourn