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89 Cards in this Set

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ambush – (Army) A form of attack by fire or other destructive means from concealed positions
on a moving or temporarily halted enemy.
_
attack by fire – A tactical mission task in which a commander uses direct fires, supported by
indirect fires, to engage an enemy without closing with him to destroy, suppress, fix, or
deceive him.
_
block – 1. A tactical mission task that denies the enemy access to an area or prevents his
advance in a direction or along an avenue of approach. 2. An obstacle effect that integrates
fire planning and obstacle effort to stop an attacker along a specific avenue of approach or to
prevent him from passing through an engagement area.
_
breach – (Army) A tactical mission task in which the unit employs all available means to break
through or secure a passage through an enemy defense, obstacle, minefield, or fortification.
_
bypass – A tactical mission task in which the commander directs his unit to maneuver around
an obstacle, avoiding combat with an enemy force.
_
canalize – (DOD) To restrict operations to a narrow zone by use of existing or reinforcing
obstacles or by fire or bombing. (Army) A tactical mission task in which the commander
restricts enemy movement to a narrow zone by exploiting terrain coupled with the use of
obstacles, fires, or friendly maneuver.
_
clear – (Army) 1. A tactical mission task that requires the commander to remove all enemy forces and eliminate
organized resistance in an assigned area.
_
contain – (DOD, NATO) To stop, hold, or surround the forces of the enemy or to cause the
enemy to center activity on a given front and to prevent the withdrawal of any part of the
enemy’s force for use elsewhere.
_
counterattack – (DOD, NATO) Attack by part or all of a defending force against an enemy
attacking force, for such specific purposes as regaining ground lost, or cutting off or
destroying enemy advance units, and with the general objective of denying to the enemy the
attainment of the enemy’s purpose in attacking. In sustained defensive operations, it is
undertaken to restore the battle position and is directed at limited objectives.
_
counterattack – (DOD, NATO) Attack by part or all of a defending force against an enemy
attacking force, for such specific purposes as regaining ground lost, or cutting off or
destroying enemy advance units, and with the general objective of denying to the enemy the
attainment of the enemy’s purpose in attacking. In sustained defensive operations, it is
undertaken to restore the battle position and is directed at limited objectives.
_
delay – A form of retrograde in which a force under pressure trades space for time by slowing
the enemy’s momentum and inflicting maximum damage on the enemy without, in principle,
becoming decisively engaged
_
delay – A form of retrograde in which a force under pressure trades space for time by slowing
the enemy’s momentum and inflicting maximum damage on the enemy without, in principle,
becoming decisively engaged
_
destroy – 1. A tactical mission task that physically renders an enemy force combat-ineffective
until it is reconstituted. 2. To damage a combat system so badly that it cannot perform any
function or be restored to a usable condition without being entirely rebuilt.
_
disrupt – 1. A tactical mission task in which a commander integrates direct and indirect fires,
terrain, and obstacles to upset an enemy’s formation or tempo, interrupt his timetable, or
cause his forces to commit prematurely or attack in piecemeal fashion. 2. An
engineer obstacle effect that focuses fire planning and obstacle effort to cause the enemy to
break up his formation and tempo, interrupt his timetable, commit breaching assets
prematurely, and attack in a piecemeal effort.
_
fix – (Army) 1. A tactical mission task where a commander prevents the enemy from moving any
part of his force from a specific location for a specific period of time. 2. An engineer obstacle
effect that focuses fire planning and obstacle effort to slow an attacker’s movement within a
specified area, normally an engagement area.
_
follow and assume – (Army) A tactical mission task in which a second committed force follows
a force conducting an offensive operation and is prepared to continue the mission if the lead
force is fixed, attrited, or unable to continue.
_
follow and support – A tactical mission task in which a committed force follows and supports a
lead force conducting an offensive operation.
_
interdict – A tactical mission task where the commander prevents, disrupts, or delays the
enemy’s use of an area or route.
_
isolate – A tactical mission task that requires a unit to seal off—both physically and
psychologically—an enemy from his sources of support, deny an enemy freedom of
movement, and prevent an enemy unit from having contact with other enemy forces.
_
neutralize – (DOD) 1. As applies to military operations, to render ineffective or unusable. 2. To
render enemy personnel or material incapable of interfering with a particular operation.
_
occupy – A tactical mission task that involves a force moving into an area so that it can control
the entire area. Both the force’s movement to and occupation of the area occur without
enemy opposition.
_
Passage of Lines
_
Passage of Lines reward
_
penetration – (DOD, NATO) In land operations, a form of offensive which seeks to break
through the enemy’s defense and disrupt the defensive system. (Army) A form of maneuver
in which an attacking force seeks to rupture enemy defenses on a narrow front to disrupt the
defensive system.
_
relief in place – (DOD, NATO) An operation in which, by direction of higher authority, all or
part of a unit is replaced in an area by the incoming unit. The responsibilities of the replaced
elements for the mission and the assigned zone of operations are transferred to the incoming
unit. The incoming unit continues the operation as ordered. Also called RIP.
_
retain –2. A tactical task to occupy and hold a terrain feature to ensure that it is free of enemy occupation or use. (Army) A tactical mission task in which the commander ensures that a terrain feature already
controlled by a friendly force remains free of enemy occupation or use.
_
_
_
secure –(Army) 1. A tactical mission task that involves preventing a unit, facility, or geographical location from being damaged or destroyed as a result of enemy action. 2. One of the five breaching fundamentals. Those actions which eliminate the enemy’s ability to interfere with the reduction and passage of
combat power through a lane. Secure may be accomplished by maneuver or by fires.
_
Security Cover
_
Security Guard
_
Security Screen
_
seize – (DOD) To employ combat forces to occupy physically and control a designated area.
(Army) A tactical mission task that involves taking possession of a designated area using
overwhelming force.
_
support by fire – A tactical mission task in which a maneuver force moves to a position where
it can engage the enemy by direct fire in support of another maneuvering force.
_
suppress – 1. A tactical mission task that results in temporary degradation of the performance
of a force or weapons system below the level needed to accomplish the mission.
2. One of the five breaching fundamentals. The focus of all fires on enemy personnel,
weapons, or equipment to prevent effective fires on friendly forces.
_
turn – 1. A tactical mission task that involves forcing an enemy force from one avenue of
approach or movement corridor to another. 2. A tactical obstacle effect that integrates fire
planning and obstacle effort to drive an enemy formation from one avenue of approach to an
adjacent avenue of approach or into an engagement area.
_
Withdraw under pressure
_
Withdraw
_
A directive from the originator of a communication requiring the addressee(s) to
advise the originator that his communication has been received and understood. This term is
normally included in the electronic transmission of orders to ensure the receiving station or
person confirms the receipt of the order.
acknowledge
– (DOD, NATO) A geographical area wherein a commander is directly
capable of influencing operations by maneuver and fire support systems normally under the
commander’s command or control.
area of influence
– (DOD) That area of concern to the commander, including the area of
influence, areas adjacent thereto, and extending into enemy territory to the objectives of
current or planned operations. This area also includes areas occupied by enemy forces who
could jeopardize the accomplishment of the mission.
area of interest
– (DOD) An operational area defined by the joint force commander for land
and naval forces. Areas of operations do not typically encompass the entire operational area
of the joint force commander, but should be large enough for component commanders to
accomplish their missions and protect their forces. Also called AO.
area of operations
(DOD) The geographical area associated with a combatant command
within which a combatant commander has authority to plan and conduct operations. Also
called AOR.
area of responsibility –
– A form of reconnaissance operations that is a directed effort to obtain
detailed information concerning the terrain or enemy activity within a prescribed area.
area reconnaissance
– A flank which is exposed to attack or envelopment.
assailable flank
(DOD) 1. The climax of an attack, closing with the enemy in hand-to-hand fighting.
2. To make a short, violent, but well-ordered attack against a local objective,
such as a gun emplacement, a fort, or a machine gun nest.
assault –
– (Army) A covered and concealed position short of the objective, from which
final preparations are made to assault the objective.
assault position
– (Army) An offensive operation that destroys or defeats enemy forces, seizes and secures
terrain, or both.
attack
– (DOD) The last position occupied by the assault echelon before crossing the
line of departure.
attack position
– (Army/Marine Corps) Fire [Note: the Army definition specifies “direct fire” here]
placed on an enemy force or position to reduce or eliminate the enemy’s capability to
interfere by fire and/or movement with friendly maneuver element(s). It may be provided by
a single weapon or a grouping of weapons systems.
base of fire
– A mission assigned to a unit that might be executed. It is generally a
contingency mission which will be executed because something planned has or has not been
successful. In planning priorities, it is planned after any on-order missions.
be-prepared mission
– A movement technique used when contact with enemy forces is
expected. The unit moves by bounds. One element is always halted in position to overwatch
another element while it moves. The overwatching element is positioned to support the
moving unit by fire or fire and movement.
bounding overwatch
2. A tactical mission task that requires the commander to maintain physical influence over a specified area to prevent its use by an enemy.
control –
–2. A form of security operation whose primary task is to protect the main body by fighting to gain
time while also observing and reporting information and preventing enemy ground
observation of and direct fire against the main body. Unlike a screening or guard force, the
covering force is a self-contained force capable of operating independently of the main body.
cover
– A tactical mission task that occurs when an enemy force has temporarily or
permanently lost the physical means or the will to fight. The defeated force’s commander is
unwilling or unable to pursue his adopted course of action, thereby yielding to the friendly
commander’s will, and can no longer interfere to a significant degree with the actions of
friendly forces. Defeat can result from the use of force or the threat of its use.
defeat
-- (Army) 1. A form of attack designed to deceive the enemy as to the location or time of the decisive operation by a display of force. Forces conducting a demonstration do not seek contact with the enemy
demonstration
– A tactical mission task where a commander has his unit break contact with the
enemy to allow the conduct of another mission or to avoid decisive engagement.
disengage
– To leave one position and take another. Forces may be displaced laterally to
concentrate combat power in threatened areas.
displace
– (Army) – A form of maneuver in which an attacking force seeks to avoid the principal
enemy defenses by seizing objectives to the enemy rear to destroy the enemy in his current
positions. At the tactical level, envelopments focus on seizing terrain, destroying specific
enemy forces, and interdicting enemy withdrawal routes.
envelopment
– A visual and sequential representation of the critical tasks and responsible
organizations by phase for a tactical operation.
execution matrix
– 3. An offensive operation that usually follows a successful attack and is designed to disorganize the enemy in depth.
exploitation
–(Army) A form of attack used to deceive the enemy as to the location or time of the actual decisive operation. Forces conducting a feint seek direct fire contact with the enemy but avoid decisive engagement.
feint
– (Army) The concept of applying fires from all sources to suppress,
neutralize, or destroy the enemy, and the tactical movement of combat forces in relation to
the enemy (as components of maneuver, applicable at all echelons). At the squad level, it
entails a team placing suppressive fire on the enemy as another team moves against or
around the enemy.
fire and movement
– (DOD, NATO) 1. A form of security operation [Note: the NATO definition replaces
“security operation” with “security element”] whose primary task is to protect the main force
by fighting to gain time while also observing and reporting information [Note: the NATO
definition ends here] and to prevent enemy ground observation of and direct fire against the
main body by reconnoitering, attacking, defending, and delaying. A guard force normally
operates within the range of the main body’s indirect fire weapons.
guard
– (DOD) A target whose loss to the enemy will significantly contribute to
the success of the friendly course of action. High-payoff targets are those high-value targets
that must be acquired and successfully attacked for the success of the friendly commander’s
mission. Also called HPT.
high-payoff target
– (DOD) A target the enemy commander requires for the successful
completion of the mission. The loss of high-value targets would be expected to seriously
degrade important enemy functions throughout the friendly commander’s area of interest.
Also called HVT.
high-value target
– (Army) 1. A form of maneuver in which an attacking force conducts undetected movement through or into an area occupied by enemy forces to occupy a position of advantage in the enemy rear while
exposing only small elements to enemy defensive fires. (FM 3-90) 2. In a tactical vehicular
march, dispatching of vehicles in small groups, or at irregular intervals, at a rate that keeps
the traffic density down and prevents undue massing of vehicles.
infiltration
– A procedure word meaning, “I shall spell the next word phonetically.”
I spell
– A procedure word meaning, “A message which requires recording is about to follow.”
message
– A mission to be executed at an unspecified time in the future. A unit with
an on-order mission is a committed force. The commander envisions task execution in the
concept of operations; however, he may not know the exact time or place of execution.
Subordinate commanders develop plans and orders and allocate resources, task-organize,
and position forces for execution.
on-order mission
A procedure word meaning, “This is the end of my transmission to you and no answer is
required or expected.” (Since “over” and “out” have opposite meanings, they are never used
together.)*never out higher
out –
over – (Army) 1. A procedure word meaning, “This is the end of my transmission to you and a response is
necessary. Go ahead; transmit.”
over
– (DOD, NATO) Those intelligence requirements for
which a commander has an anticipated and stated priority in his task of planning and
decisionmaking. See FM 3-0. (Marine Corps) In Marine Corps usage, an intelligence
requirement associated with a decision that will critically affect the overall success of the
command’s mission. Also called PIRs.
priority intelligence requirements
– (DOD, NATO) An offensive operation designed to catch or cut off a hostile force
attempting to escape, with the aim of destroying it.
pursuit
– (DOD, NATO) An operation, usually small scale, involving a swift penetration of hostile
territory to secure information, confuse the enemy, or to destroy installations. It ends with a
planned withdrawal upon completion of the assigned mission.
raid
– A procedure word meaning, “Repeat this entire transmission back to me exactly as
received.”
read back
– (DOD, NATO) A mission undertaken to obtain, by visual observation or other
detection methods, information about the activities and resources of an enemy or potential
enemy, or to secure data concerning the meteorological, hydrographic, or geographic
characteristics of a particular area. Also called recce; recon.
reconnaissance
– A type of defensive operation that involves organized movement away from the
enemy
retrograde
– A procedure word meaning “I have received your last transmission satisfactorily.”
roger
– (Army/Marine Corps) A directed effort to obtain detailed information
of a specified route and all terrain from which the enemy could influence movement along
that route.
route reconnaissance
– A procedure word meaning, “Repeat all of your last transmission.” (Followed by
identification data, means “Repeat ________ (portion indicated).”)
say again
– (DOD only) A task to maintain surveillance; provide early warning to the main body; or impede, destroy, and harass enemy reconnaissance within its capability without becoming decisively engaged.
(Army) A form of security operation that primarily provides early warning to the protected force.
screen
– An easily recognizable point on the ground (either natural or manmade)
used to initiate, distribute, and control fires. Target reference points (TRPs) can also
designate the center of an area where the commander plans to distribute or converge the
fires of all his weapons rapidly. They are used by task force and below, and can further
delineate sectors of fire within an engagement area. TRPs are designated using the standard
target symbol and numbers issued by the fire support officer. Once designated, TRPs also
constitute indirect fire targets. Also called TRP.
target reference point
– (DOD, NATO) A variation of the envelopment in which the attacking
force passes around or over the enemy’s principal defensive positions to secure objectives
deep in the enemy’s rear to force the enemy to abandon his position or divert major forces to
meet the threat. (Army) A form of maneuver in which the attacking force seeks to avoid the
enemy’s principal defensive positions by seizing objectives to the enemy rear and causing the
enemy to move out of his current positions or divert major forces to meet the threat.
turning movement
– Weapon control statuses (weapons free, weapons tight, weapons hold)
describe the relative degree of control of air defense fires. Weapon control statuses apply to
weapon systems, volumes of airspace, or types of air platforms. The degree or extent of
control varies depending on the tactical situation.
weapon control status
—Weapons can fire at any
air target not positively identified as friendly. This is the least restrictive weapon control
status.
Weapons Free
—Fire only at air targets that are identified as hostile according to
the prevailing hostile criteria. Identification can be effected by a number of means to include
visual identification (aided or unaided), electronic, or procedural means. Capabilities dictate
that air defense artillery units engage threatening ballistic missiles and ASMs based on
classification, not identification.
Weapons Tight
—Do not fire except in self-defense or in
response to a formal order. This is the most restrictive weapon control status.
Weapons Hold
– A procedure word meaning, “I have received your signal, understand it, and will
comply.” (To be used only by addressee. Since the meaning of ROGER is included in that of
WILCO, the two procedure words are never used together.)
wilco
– A form of reconnaissance that involves a directed effort to obtain
detailed information on all routes, obstacles, terrain, and enemy forces within a zone defined
by boundaries.
zone reconnaissance