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12 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
PACING AND SELECTION
-If you're getting fewer than 12 questions right on the Games section, focus on two games; if you're getting fewer than 18 questions right, focus on three games.
-Look for games with familiar clues, a one-to-one correspondence, and concrete questions; avoid games with difficult diagrams, vague clues, and complex questions
PACING AND SELECTION
-Look for games with familiar clues, a one-to-one correspondence, and concrete questions; avoid games with difficult diagrams, vague clues, and Complex questions
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-The elements are the mobiles pieces in a games; don't forget to list them in an inventory near your diagram
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-When elements come in two types, use uppercase and lowercase letters to distinguish them; if uppercase and lowercase are not appropriate, use subscripts
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-Always keep track of the rules for using elemts; CAn they be used more than once? Doall of them have to be used?
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-To diagram the game, look for what stays the same. If it isn't clear what stays the same, be sure to inspect the clues for ideas
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-If the game asks you to put the elements in order, the ordered collection (days of the week, times positions from right to left) will usually serve as the core of your diagram
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-if an odering games asks you to put more than one thing at each time/position, stack your boxes into tiers or use a chart
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-If a game asks you to arrange elements spatially, draw a picture of the space and use that as your diagram. Keep your pictures small so you don't have to erase
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-A grouping game asks you to put the elements into collections of some sort; grouping games usually include clues that can be easy translated as block or antiblocks
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-An IN/OUT game asks you to choose some of the elements but not others; these are similar to grouping games, but the "OUT" column may not obey the same rules as the "IN" column
DIAGRAM AND INVENTORY
-Hybrid games may combine two or more of the tasks above; construct the diagram for a hybrid game by fusing together the diagrams appropriate for each task. if one task is more important than another, make that one the core of your diagram