Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/24

Click to flip

24 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of cholinesterase inhibitors?
-Inhibit cholinesterase
-It is an organophosphate
-Potent w/ good residual effects
-Carbamates are safer than organophosphates
-Toxic to Cats
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Pyrethrins?
-Oil extract from Chrysanthemum flower
-Causes extended membrane depolarization
-Inactivated by UV light
-Rapidly kill
-Low residual effect

-Piperonyl butoxide often added
-Must be re-applied if animal goes outside
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Permethrins?
-Synthetic pyrethrin
-More UV stable
-Fast kill

**TOXIC TO CATS**
-Found in most OTC flea products
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of IGR’s?
-Juvenile hormone analogs
-Ovicida
-Larvicidal
-Long residual effect
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Lefenuron (Program)?
-Insect development inhibitor
-Inhibits chitin synthesis
-Stored in body fat
-NOT an adulticide (limits its use in FAD)
-All contact animals need to be treated
-Slow acting

-Oral or injectable
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Fipronyl (Frontline)?
-Phenylpyrazole
-GABA receptor antagonist
-Affinity for SQ secretions
-Effective against ticks
FRONTLINE PLUS:
-Fipronyl + Methoprene
-Addition of juvenile growth hormone analogs
-Prevents emergence of fipronyl resistant flea populations

-Can bath animal w/out loosing efficacy
-Apply monthly for FAD patients
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Imidacloprid (Advantage)?
-Chloronicotinyl compound
-Binds to post-synaptic nicotinic receptors
-NOT effective against ticks

-Efficacy may be decreased by bathing
-Apply once a month
In regards to flea control, what is the range of action of Selemectin (Revolution)?
-Activity against fleas, ticks (only Dermacantor variabilis), dirofilaria, sarcoptes, odectes, hooks, and rounds
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Citrus Oil?
-Disrupts flea ectoskeleton

-Found in many OTC shampoo’s
-Skin irritation and adverse side effects
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Nitenpyram (Capstar)?
-Rapid acting adulticide
In regards to flea control, what is the MOA of Advantix?
-Imidacloprdi + Permethrin
-Added efficacy against ticks

-Use only in dog households
-DO NOT USE ON CATS (toxic even if cat rubs on dog)
What is the basic life-cycle of a flea?
Egg
L1
L2
L3
Pupae
Adult
What are some characteristics of flea eggs?
-White
-Non-sticky
-Laid on host and fall into environment to complete life cycle
-Hatch in 1-10 days
-.5mm in length
What are some characteristics of flea larvae?
-Legless, move by a single row of bristles on each segment
-Yellow to white in color
-Non-parasitic
-Geotactic and photophobic so they move deeper into carpets, cracks in wood, soil
-Can move over 40cm in carpet
-Feed on organic debris and dried blood
-3 molts in larval stage
-5-11 days is the larval stage if sufficient food and right climate (dryness, extreme heat or cold are detrimental)
What are some characteristics of flea pupae?
-Sticky cocoon
-Highly resistant to desiccation and parasiticides
-Peak emergence is 8-9 days
-Emergence depends upon:
-Temperature
-Physical pressure
What are some characteristics of adult flea?
-Small, brown, wingless
-Laterally compressed bodies
-Attracted to host by:
-Movement
-Warmth
-Carbon dioxide
-Live entire life on host (can live on host for up to 100 days)
-Female lays eggs 3-4 days after a blood meal
-Female can lay 13-35 eggs per day
How would you diagnose a flea allergy?
-History
-PE
-Intradermal skin tests
-Serologic tests
-Histopathology
-Response to therapy
How would you treat a flea allergy?
-Flea control
-Anti-pruritics
-Antibiotics if necessary
-Immunotherapy if ineffective
What are some clinical signs of a flea allergy in a dog?
-Caudal 1/3 of body
-Pruritis
-Papules, crusts
-Pyotraumatic dermatitis
-W/ chronicity can see:
-Alopecia
-Lichenfication
-Hyperpigmentation
What are some clinical signs of a flea allergy in a cat?
-Caudal 1/3 of body and neck
-Miliary dermatitis
-Symmetric alopecia w/ no lesions
-Eosinophilic granuloma complex
Which flea products are toxic to cats?
-Permethrines, Cholinesterase inhibitors
What is the most common species of flea found on the dog? Cat?
-Ctenocephalides felis
-Prevelance is greater than 92% in dogs and 97% in cats
How does intermittent vs. continuous exposure to fleas affect a pet’s reaction to them?
Intermittent exposure = predisposes animals to FAD (flea atopic dermatitis)
Continuous exposure = may lead to tolerance
What the are signs associated w/ pruritus in cats?
-Indolent ulcers (lips)
-Granulomatous red lesions on ventrum