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37 Cards in this Set

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stress
the mental, emotional, and physiological response of the body to any situation that is new, threatening, frightening, or exciting
stressor
stress-causing event
eustress
positive stress: health and performance continue to improve, even as stress increases
distress
negative stress: unpleasant or harmful stress under which health and performance begin to deteriorate
homeostasis
a natural state of equilibrium; the body attempts to maintain this equilibrium by constantly reacting to external forces that attempt to disrupt this fine balance
general adaptation syndrome (GAS)
a theoretical model that explains the body's adaptation to sustained stress which includes three stages: alarm reaction, resistance, and exhaustion/recovery
life experiences survey
a questionnaire used to assess sources of stress in life
neustresss
neutral stress; stress that is neither harmful nor helpful
structured interview
assessment tool used to determine behavioral patterns that define Type A and B personalities
Type A
behavior pattern characteristic of a hard-driving, overambitious, aggressive, at times hostile, and overly competitive person
Type B
behavior pattern characteristic of a calm, casual, relaxed, and easy-going individual
Type C
behavior patter charactersitic of individuals who are just as highly stressed as the Type A but do not seem to be at higher risk for disease than the Type B
fight or flight
physiological response of the body to stress that prepares the individual to take action by stimulating the body's vital defense systems
endorphins
morphine-like substancees released from the pituitary gland in the brain during prolonged aerobic exercise. they are thought to induce feelings of euphoria and natural well-being
biofeedback
a stress-management technique in which a person learns to influence physiological responses that are not typically ujnder voluntary control or responses that typically are regulated but for which regulation has broken down as a result of injury, trauma, or illness
stress
the mental, emotional, and physiological response of the body to any situation that is new, threatening, frightening, or exciting
stressor
stress-causing event
eustress
positive stress: health and performance continue to improve, even as stress increases
distress
negative stress: unpleasant or harmful stress under which health and performance begin to deteriorate
homeostasis
a natural state of equilibrium; the body attempts to maintain this equilibrium by constantly reacting to external forces that attempt to disrupt this fine balance
general adaptation syndrome (GAS)
a theoretical model that explains the body's adaptation to sustained stress which includes three stages: alarm reaction, resistance, and exhaustion/recovery
life experiences survey
a questionnaire used to assess sources of stress in life
neustresss
neutral stress; stress that is neither harmful nor helpful
structured interview
assessment tool used to determine behavioral patterns that define Type A and B personalities
Type A
behavior pattern characteristic of a hard-driving, overambitious, aggressive, at times hostile, and overly competitive person
Type B
behavior pattern characteristic of a calm, casual, relaxed, and easy-going individual
Type C
behavior patter charactersitic of individuals who are just as highly stressed as the Type A but do not seem to be at higher risk for disease than the Type B
fight or flight
physiological response of the body to stress that prepares the individual to take action by stimulating the body's vital defense systems
endorphins
morphine-like substancees released from the pituitary gland in the brain during prolonged aerobic exercise. they are thought to induce feelings of euphoria and natural well-being
biofeedback
a stress-management technique in which a person learns to influence physiological responses that are not typically ujnder voluntary control or responses that typically are regulated but for which regulation has broken down as a result of injury, trauma, or illness
progressive muscle relaxation
a stress management technique that involves progressive contraction and relaxation of muscle groups throughout the body
breathing exercises
a stress management technique wherein the individual concentrates on "breathing away" the tension and inhaling fresh air to the entire body
imagery
mental visualization of relaxing images and scenes to induce body relaxation in times of stress or as an aid in the treatment of certain medical conditions such as cancer, hypertension, asthma, chronic pain, and obesity
autogenic training
a stress management technique using a form of self-suggestion, wherein an individual is able to place himself or herself in an autohyptnotic state by repeating and concentrating on feelings of heaviness and warmth in the extremeties
meditation
a stress management technique used to gain control over one's attention by clearing the mind and blocking out the stressor(s) responsible for the increased tension
yoga
a school of thought in the Hindu religion that seeks to help the individual attain a higher level of spirituality and peace of mind
hatha yoga
a form of yoga that incorporates specific sequences of static-stretching postures to help induce the relaxation response