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30 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
100. Antidepressants used for OCD?
a. SSRIs (in high doses)
b. TCAs (clomipramine)
101. Antidepressants used for Panic Disorder?
a. SSRIs
b. TCAs (Imipramine)
c. MAOIs
102. Antidepressants used for dysthymia?
a. SSRIs
103. Antidepressants used for Social phobia?
a. SSRIs
b. TCAs
c. MAOIs
104. Antidepressants used for GAD?
a. SSRI
b. SNRIs (Venlafaxine)
c. TCAs
105. Antidepressants used for PTSD?
a. SSRIs
106. Antidepressants used for IBS?
a. SSRI
b. TCA
108. Antidepressants used for Neuropathic pain?
a. Amitriptyline and nortriptyline (TCAs)
b. Duloxetine (Cymbalta) (SNRI)
109. Antidepressants used for Chronic pain?
a. SSRIs
b. TCAs
110. Antidepressants used for Fibromyalgia?
a. SSRIs and cymbalta (duloxetine)
111. Antidepressants used for Migraine HA?
a. Amitriptyline (TCA)
b. SSRIs
115. Antidepressants used for Insomnia?
a. Mirtazapine (Remeron)
b. Amitriptyline (TCA).
118. Warning about atypical antipsychotics?
a. Although they are used to tx sx of dementia and delirium, studies who an ↑ risk of all-cause mortality and stroke when using these agents in the elderly.
119. Typical or first-gen antipsychotics, sometimes referred to as neuroleptics, are classified according to potency and treat psychosis by?
a. Blocking Dopamine D2 receptors.
120. What do atypical or second-generation antipsychotics (newer) block?
a. Both D2 and serotonin 2A receptors.
121. note: Most antipsychotics have a number of actions and receptor interactions in the brain that contribute to their varied efficacy and SE profile.
121. note: Most antipsychotics have a number of actions and receptor interactions in the brain that contribute to their varied efficacy and SE profile.
122. What do both the typicals and atypicals have similar efficacies in treating?
a. Positive psychotic sx, such as hallucinations and delusions.
123. What are atypical antipsychotics more effective in treating?
a. Negative sx, such as flattened affect and social withdrawal.
124. Note: atypical antipsychotics had largely replaced typical antipsychotics in use due to their favourable side effect profile.
a. However, evidence for metabolic syndrome, wt. gain, and other previously underappreciated side effects, as well as the significant cost, means that currently both classes are first line.
125. 2 Low potency typical antipsychotics?
1. Chlorpromazine (Thorazine)
2. Thioridazine (Mellaril)
126. MOA of low potency typical antipsychotics (Chlorpromazine and Thioridazine)?
a. Have a lower affinity for dopamine receptors and therefore a higher dose is required.
b. Remember, potency refers to the actino on dopamine receptors, not the level of efficacy!.
127. What do the low potency antipsychotics have a higher incidence of than high-potency?
a. Anticholinergic and antihistaminic effects.
128. What do the low potency antipsychotics have a lower incidence of than high-potency?
a. EPS and neuroleptic malignant syndrome.
129. Heart risk of low potency antipsychotics?
a. As a group, they have more lethality in overdose due to QTc prolongation and the potential for heart block and ventricular tachycardia.
130. Is there a blood risk w/ low potency antipsychotics?
a. There is a rare risk for agranulocytosis, and they have a slightly higher seizure risk than higher-potency meds.
131. 3 side effects of Chlorpromazine (Thorazine) (low potency)?
a. Common: Orthostatic hypotension
b. Can cause bluish skin discolouration
c. Photosensitivity
132. 2 Non-psychotic uses of chlorpromazine (Thorazine)?
a. Can treat N/V as well as intractable hiccups.
133. Unique SE of Thioridazine (Mellaril)?
a. Associated w/retinitis pigmentosa.
134. 4 Mid-potency, typical antipsychotics?
a. Have Midrange properties.
1. Loxapine (Loxitane)
2. Thiothixene (Navane)
3. Trifluoperazine (Stelazine)
4. Perphenazine (Trilafon)
135. What is the risk w/Loxapine (Loxitane) and what is the effect of its metabolite?
a. Higher risk of seizure
b. Metabolite is an antidepressant.
c. Loxapine is a mid-potency antipsychotic.