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22 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
21. Comorbid disorders w/ Bulimia Nervosa?
a. High incidence of comorbid disorders, anxiety disorders, impulse control disorders, substance abuse, sexual abuse, and ↑ prevalence of cluster B and C personality disorders.
22. note: Unlike pts w/anorexia nervosa, bulimic pts usually maintain normal weight, and their sx are more ego-dystonic (distressing).
a. They are therefore more likely to seek help.
1. note: Unlike pts w/anorexia nervosa, bulimic pts usually maintain normal weight, and their sx are more ego-dystonic (distressing).
a. They are therefore more likely to seek help.
23. Binge eating?
a. Defined by excessive food intake w/in a 2-hr period accompanied by a sense of lack of control.
24. Cortisol levels in Anorexia Nervosa?
a. Often ↑.
25. Most diagnostic criteria of Bulimia Nervosa according to the DSM?
a. Recurrent episodes of binge eating.
26. What are Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa risk factors for?
a. Developing cardiac arrhythmias due to electrolyte disturbances such as hypokalemia.
27. Course and prognosis of Bulimia Nervosa?
a. Chronic and relapsing.
b. Better prognosis than anorexia nervosa.
c. Sx are usually exacerbated by stressful conditions.
d. ½ recover fully w/tx. ½ have chronic course w/fluctuating sx.
28. Tx of Bulimia Nervosa?
a. Antidepressants plus therapy (more effective combo for bulimia than anorexia.
b. SSRIs are first-line meds.
c. Therapy includes CBT, interpersonal psychotherapy, group, and family therapy.
d. Avoid bupropion.
29. Why should bupropion (Wellbutrin) be avoided in Bulimics?!?
a. Due to its potential side effect to lower seizure threshold.
30. Only FDA-approved med for bulimia?
a. Fluoxetine (60-80 mg/day)
b. Often requires multiple medications.
31. Binge-Eating Disorder overview?
a. Binge-eating Disorder falls under the DSM category of eating disorder NOS.
b. Pts w/this disorder suffer emotional distress over their binge eating, but they do not try to control their weight by purging or restricting calories, as do anorexic or bulimics.
c. Unlike anorexia and bulimia, these pts are not fixated on their body shape or weight.
31. Binge-Eating Disorder overview?
a. Binge-eating Disorder falls under the DSM category of eating disorder NOS.
b. Pts w/this disorder suffer emotional distress over their binge eating, but they do not try to control their weight by purging or restricting calories, as do anorexic or bulimics.
c. Unlike anorexia and bulimia, these pts are not fixated on their body shape or weight.
32. DSM diagnosis of Binge-Eating Disorder?
a. Recurrent episodes of binge eating (eating excessive amount of food in a 2-hr period associated w/a lack of control.
b. Severe distress over binge eating.
c. Binge eating occurs at least 2 days a wk for 6 months and is not associated w/compensatory behaviours (such as vomiting, laxative use, exercise, etc).
d. 3 or more of the following are present:
1. Eating very rapidly
2. Eating until uncomfortably full.
3. Eating large amounts when not hungry
4. Eating along due to embarrassment over eating habits
5. Feeling disgusted, depressed, or guilt after overeating.
32. DSM diagnosis of Binge-Eating Disorder?
a. Recurrent episodes of binge eating (eating excessive amount of food in a 2-hr period associated w/a lack of control.
b. Severe distress over binge eating.
c. Binge eating occurs at least 2 days a wk for 6 months and is not associated w/compensatory behaviours (such as vomiting, laxative use, exercise, etc).
d. 3 or more of the following are present:
1. Eating very rapidly
2. Eating until uncomfortably full.
3. Eating large amounts when not hungry
4. Eating along due to embarrassment over eating habits
5. Feeling disgusted, depressed, or guilt after overeating.
33. Tx of Binge-eating Disorder?
a. Individual psychotherapy and behavioural therapy w/a strict diet and exercise program.
b. Comorbid mood disorders or anxiety disorders should be treated.
c. Pharmacotherapy may be used adjunctively to promote wt. loss, including:
1. Stimulants (such as phentermine and amphetamine)- suppress appetite
2. Orlistat (Xenical) inhibits pancreatic lipase, thus decreasing the amount of fat absorbed from GI tract.
3. Sibutramine (Meridia).
33. Tx of Binge-eating Disorder?
a. Individual psychotherapy and behavioural therapy w/a strict diet and exercise program.
b. Comorbid mood disorders or anxiety disorders should be treated.
c. Pharmacotherapy may be used adjunctively to promote wt. loss, including:
1. Stimulants (such as phentermine and amphetamine)- suppress appetite
2. Orlistat (Xenical) inhibits pancreatic lipase, thus decreasing the amount of fat absorbed from GI tract.
3. Sibutramine (Meridia).
34. Orlistat (Xenical) MOA?
1. inhibits pancreatic lipase, thus decreasing the amount of fat absorbed from GI tract.
34. Orlistat (Xenical) MOA?
1. inhibits pancreatic lipase, thus decreasing the amount of fat absorbed from GI tract.
35. Sibutramine (Meridia)?
a. Inhibits reuptake of norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine.
35. Sibutramine (Meridia)?
a. Inhibits reuptake of norepinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine.
36. Complete
36. Complete
36. Complete
36. Complete