Study your flashcards anywhere!

Download the official Cram app for free >

  • Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/28

Click to flip

28 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
  • 3rd side (hint)
adjective

: of or relating to fields or open country : rural
campestral
derives from the Latin noun "campus," meaning "field" or "plain." Latin "campester" is the adjective that means "pertaining to a campus."
noun

: extreme chauvinism or nationalism marked especially by a belligerent foreign policy
jingoism
adj

1 British : impaired by age or dampness : moldy
2 : saturated with dust and stale odors : musty
*3 : rigidly old-fashioned or reactionary
fusty
probably derives from the Middle English word "foist," meaning "wine cask," which in turn traces to the Medieval Latin word "fustis," meaning "tree trunk" or "wood." iit came to mean full of mold and dampness because wine in a flask too long would taste like wood and eventually came to mean old-fashioned
noun

1 : the whole series of recognized musical notes
*2 : an entire range or series
gamut
started with a guy named Guido who called the first line of his bass staff "gamma" and the first note of his scale "ut" "gamma ut" stood for the note written on the first staff line and it was eventually changed to cover not only Guido's scale, but all instruments and eventually an entired range of many sorts
verb

: to soothe or mollify especially by concessions : appease
placate
derived from the Latin "placatus," the past participle of "placare," and even after more than 300 years in English it still carries the basic meaning of its Latin ancestor: "to soothe" or "to appease."
noun

1 : framework
2 : a central unit especially of trained personnel able to assume control and train others
*3 : a group of people with a unifying relationship
cadre
traces to the Latin "quadrum," meaning "square."
verb

*1 : to make (as a doctrine) known by open declaration : proclaim
2 a : to make known or public the terms of (a proposed law) b : to put (a law) into action or force
promulgate
from the Latin "promulgatus," which in turn derives from "pro-," meaning "forward," and "-mulgare," a form that is probably related to the verb "mulgēre," meaning "to milk" or "to extract."
noun

1 : an act of guarding or protecting
2 : the state of being under a guardian or tutor
*3 : instruction especially of an individual
tutelage
Latin verb "tueri" means "to look at" or "to guard."
n
lover of beauty: somebody who has or affects a highly developed appreciation of beauty, especially in the arts
aesthete
From Greek aisthētikos “perceptual,” from aisthesthai “to perceive” (source of English anesthetic, literally “without feeling”). The sense “relating to perception of beauty” evolved from “perception.”]
adj
1. done routinely: done as a matter of duty or custom, without thought, attention, or genuine feeling
a perfunctory kiss

2. hasty: done hastily or superficially
a perfunctory search
perfunctory
Via late Latin perfunctorius from, ultimately, perfungi , literally “to work through,” from fungi (source of English function).]
adj.) abundant, using wordy style
copious
from Latin copiosus , from copia “abundance”

adj.) insignificant, despicable, unimportant
paltry
verb

: howl, wail
ululate
descends from the Latin verb "ululare" and likely originated in the echoes of rhythmic wailing sound associated with it
adjective

1 a chiefly Scottish : fated to die : doomed b : marked by a foreboding of death or calamity
2 a : able to see into the future : visionary b : marked by an otherworldly air or attitude c : crazy, touched
3 a : excessively refined : precious *b : quaintly unconventional : campy
fey
adjective

: of, relating to, or having the characteristics of an imaginary place of high romance
Ruritarian
from a book by a British man about the mystical kingdom of Ruritaria
n) carefree attitude, lacking concern
insouciance
Via French from soucier , “to care,” formed from Latin solicitare “to trouble” (leads to solicit)

n) seriousness of behavior; a serious, solemn attitude
gravitas
from Latin "gravitas" meaning heavyness
adjective

*1 : marked by lack of definite plan, regularity, or purpose
2 : not connected with the main subject
3 : disappointing in progress, performance, or quality
desultory
derived from the Latin verb "salire," which means "to leap"
adjective

: not genuine : spurious; also : cheaply showy : tawdry
brummagem
derives from the British town of Burmingham tht became known for producing cheap trinkets and gilt jewelry
adjective

1 : depending on an uncertain event or contingency
2 : relating to luck and especially to bad luck
*3 : characterized by chance or random elements
aleatory
from the Latin noun "alea," which refers to a kind of dice game
noun

1 a : the quality or state of being changeable : mutability b : natural change or mutation visible in nature or in human affairs
2 *a : a favorable or unfavorable event or situation that occurs by chance : a fluctuation of state or condition b : a difficulty or hardship attendant on a way of life, a career, or a course of action and usually beyond one's control c : alternating change : succession
vicissitude
descendant of the Latin noun "vicis," meaning "change" or "alternation"
adjective

: serenely free of interruption or disturbance; also : complacent
placid
traces back to Latin "placēre," meaning "to please"
noun

: a public promenade bordered with trees
alameda
Spanish speakers used "álamo" as the basis for this word, which refers to either a grove of poplar trees or a tree-lined avenue
adjective

: characterized by disputatious and often subtle and specious reasoning
erisitic
come from the Greek "eristikos," meaning "fond of wrangling," from "erizein," "to wrangle," and ultimately from "eris," which means "strife"
verb

: steal, filch
cabbage
probably derived from "cabas," the Middle French word for "cheating or theft." *not related to the head of cabbage which comes from "caboche" meaning "head"
noun

1 a : a Byzantine emperor or prince b : a bishop or patriarch of the Eastern Orthodox Church c : an Italian hereditary prince or military leader during the Renaissance
2 a : a ruler with absolute power and authority *b : a person exercising power tyrannically
despot
it comes from a Greek word meaning "lord" or "master" and was originally applied to deities; used to be a good title, but after French Revolution it lost its flavor
verb

1 : to constitute outward evidence of
*2 : to display clearly : reveal
evince
derives from the Latin "evincere," meaning "to vanquish" or "to win a point" and that root in turn traces to "vincere," Latin for "to conquer"
adjective

1 : taking on values arbitrarily close to but greater than zero
*2 : immeasurably or incalculably small
infinitesimal
ultimately from Latin "infinitus," the opposite of "finitus," meaning "finite."