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29 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
allegory
A story in which a second meaning is to be read underneath
allusion
A reference to a person, place or event meant to create an effect or enhance the meaning of an idea
anachronism
A person, scene, event, or other element that fails to correspond with the appropriate time or era. Example: Columbus sailing to the U.S.
anecdote
A brief narrative often used to illustrate an idea or make a point
antecedent
A word to which a pronoun refers
aphorism
A short, pity statement of a generally accepted truth or sentiment. (see adage & maxim)
apostrophe
A locution that addresses a person or personified thing not present Example: "Oh, you cruel streets of Manhattan, how I detest you!"
archetype
An abstract or ideal conception of a type; a perfectly typical example; an original model or form
bathos
Insincere or overdone sentimentality
cacophony
Grating, inharmonious sounds
circumlocution
Literally, "talking around" a subject; i.e., discourse that avoids direct reference to a subject
connotation
The suggested or implied meaning of a word or phrase. Contrast with denotation
didactic
Having an instructive purpose; intending to convey info or teach a lesson, usually in a dry, pompous manner
Dionysian
As distinguished from Apollonian, the word refers to sensual, pleasure-seeking impulses
elegy
A poem or prose selection that laments or mediates on the passing or death of someone or something of value.
euphony
Pleasing, harmonious sounds
fallacy
An incorrect belief or supposition based on faulty data, defective evidence, or false information
hyperbole
Overstatement; gross exaggeration for rhetorical effect
loose sentence
A sentence that follows the customary word order of English sentences, ie., subject-verb-object. The main idea of the sentence is presented first and is then followed by one or more subordinate clauses
periodic sentence
A sentence that departs from the usual word order of English sentences by expressing its main thought only at the end In other words, the particulars in the sentence are presented before the idea they support
motif
A phrase, idea, or event that through repetition serves to unify or convey a theme in an essay or other discourse
non sequitur
A statement or idea that fails to follow logically from the one before
paradox
A statement that seems self-contradictory but is nevertheless true
parallel structure
The structure required for expressing two or more grammatical elements of equal rank. Coordinate ideas, compared and contrasted ideas, and correlative constructions call for this
pathos
The element in literature that stimulates pity or sorrow
rhetorical question
A question in which the audience already knows the answer; a question asked merely for effect with no answer expected
satire
A literary style used to poke fun at, attack, or ridicule an idea, vice or foible, often for the purpose of inducing change
syllogism
A form of deductive reasoning in which given certain ideas or facts, other ideas or facts must follow
understatement
A restrained statement that departs from what could be said; a studied avoidance of emphasis or exaggeration, often to create a particular effect