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30 Cards in this Set

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Gastroenteritis
Enterogenic strains: Produces 2 toxins (heat liable and heat stable)

Causes Infantile/Epidemic diarrhea(in nurseries)
Traveler's diarrhea (Turista, Delhi Belly)
0157:H7
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome
E. Coli
Clostridium
Campylobacter
Vibrio
Name the organisms that causes Gastroenteritis. (4)
Prevention of Gastroenteritis
"Don't drink the water"
Antibiotic prophylacsis: Doxycycline/Vibromycin
Peptobismol
Pseudomembranous colitis
In Gastroenteritis, Clostridium causes what specific disease?
Raw milk
Water
Meats
How is Gastroenteritis transmitted?
Fish and crustasions that are found in water
WIth Gastroenteritis, Vibrio is one of the most common causes of gastroenteritis. How is it transmitted?
Helicobacter
Name the genus that causes stomach ulcers and stomach cancer.
virus
What type of organism causes the Mumps?
Parotitis
What is the name for the disease with the common name of Mumps?
Mumps
Name the disease with the symptoms of painful swelling of the parotid glands and fever. With the complications: Sterility now disclaimed, meningitis, inflammation of the ovaries and testes, pancreatitis, hearing loss and encephalitis.
Orchitits
What is the word for inflammation of the testes
Droplet
fomites
How is mumps transmitted?
Paramyxovirus
Name the genus that causes the disease, Mumps.
Measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (trivalent)
How is Mumps prevented?
Hepatitus A
What Hep. is the Infectious Hep?
Hepatitis A
50% of the pop. is infected by adulthood. Does not cause chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis: vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, jaundice. Most infections resolve within 6-10 weeks. The patient becomes immune (lifelong). Can cause acute liver disease, and in rare cases death.
Oral-fecal route
How is Hep. A transmitted?
Vaccine
How is Hep. A prevented?
Hepatitis B
What Hep. is referred to as Serum Hep.?
Hep. B
Approx. 300,000 new cases/ year US & 200 deaths of health care workers/ year.

Often progresses to cirrhosis, chronic hepititis, liver cancer and death.

Loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, fever, fatigue, abdominal pain, dark urine, jaundice.
IV drug use
needle stick
tattoos or body piercing
sexual contact
dialysis
blood transfusions
fomites
How is Hep. B transmitted?
Vaccine
How is Hep. B prevented?
Hepatitis C
What hep is referred to as Posttransfusion Non A or Non B hepatitis?
Hep. C
Prevalent and underreported
120,000/yr US
Chronic hepatitis
Cirrhosis
death
Blood transfusion before 1992
How is Hep. C transmitted?
Hep. D
What hep. is referred to as the Delta virus?
Hep. D
A coinfection of HBV.
Chronic hepatitis
cirrhosis
death
Hep. E
What Hep. is referred to as Enteric or Non A or Non B hepatitis?
Hep. E
Rarei in the US
Acute infection
Not chronic
10% die in pregnant females

Transmission: contaminated water
virus
What type of organism causes all Hepatitis types?