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20 Cards in this Set

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Pufendorf's moral intuitions
duties to God
duties to oneself
duties to others
duties to God
know the existence and nature of God; worship God
duties to oneself
develop one's skills and talents; avoid harming our bodies such as through gluttony or drunkenness and not killing oneself
duties to others
avoid wronging others; treat people as equals; promote the good of others; keep one's promises
rationalism
the theory that reason can tell us how the world is, independent of experience
empiricism
the theory that we have no innate ideas and that all knowledge comes from experience
natural law theory
the theory that morality is a function of human nature and reason can discover valid moral principles by looking at the nature of humanity and society
intuitionism
the theory that humans have a natural faculty that gives us an intuitive awareness of morality
act-instuitionism
the theory that we must consult our moral institution or conscience in every situation to discover morally right thing to do (Butler)
rule-instuitionism
the instuitionist view that we must decide what is right or wrong in each situation by consulting moral rules that we receive through intuition (Pufendorf, Ross)
Pufendorf's moral intuitions
duties to God
duties to oneself
duties to others
duties to God
know the existence and nature of God; worship God
duties to oneself
develop one's skills and talents; avoid harming our bodies such as through gluttony or drunkenness and not killing oneself
duties to others
avoid wronging others; treat people as equals; promote the good of others; keep one's promises
hypothetical imperative
the non-moral principles that takes the form "if you want A then do B"
categorical imperative
a moral imperative that is unqualified and does not depend on one's desires, the general statement of which is "act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it would become a universal law"
universalizability
the view that moral principles must apply to all people who are in a relevantly similar situation
counter examples of the law of nature
mandating trivial actions
endorsing cheating
prohibiting permissible actions
mandating genocide
autonomy
self directed freedom. from the greek for "self-rule"
heteronomy
the determination of the will on non-rational grounds; contrasted with autonomy of the will, in which the will is guided by reason