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104 Cards in this Set

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(Line Handling)

Hold
To not allow any more line to run out or take any in.
(Line Handling)

Check
To keep a strain on a line but to ease out only enough to prevent it from parting.
(Line Handling)

Ease
To do something slowly and keep the strain off of the line but not allow a caternary
(Line Handling)

Slack
To ease out a line and put a caternary in it
(Line Handling)

Take-in
To bring in lines from the pier
(Line Handling)

Cast-off
To remove lines from the pier fittings
(Line Handling)

Avast
To stop
(Line Handling)

Heave around
To haul in on a line
Line
Measured by circumference. Line 1 3/4" or smaller is known as small stuff and measured by threads
Wire rope
Classified by diameter and measured by the number of strands and number of wires in a strand.
Swing Circle
The anchor chanin plus the length of the ship
Drag Circle
The anchor chain plus the length from the pelorus to the hawsepipe
(small boats)

Sea Painter
a 3" circumference line led from the bow of the MWB to a point forward on the ship and secured to a deck fitting. Length determined to be that which would allow the boat to be positioned directly under the boat falls when tension is placed ont he line.
(small boats)

Steady Lines
Steadies the boat
(small boats)

Man ropes (monkey lines)
Lines with knots every 13" that run down from the span (wire) which the boat crew places 75% of their weight on
(ground tackle)

Bitts
A pair of heavy metal cylinders, fastened in a vertical position on deck to which mooring lines are secured
(ground tackle)

Chock
A metal fitting that serves a as a lead for lines to a pier or to other ships. It may be open or closed
(ground tackle)

Cleat
A metal fitting with two projecting arms to which lines are belayed
(ground tackle)

Bullnose
Forward most chock on the centerline
(ground tackle)

Hawse pipe
A large pipe that an anchor chain runs through. his is where the anchor is stowed
(ground tackle)

Chain
Attached to the anchor to lower and raise it. It's stowed in the chain locker
(ground tackle)

Turnbuckle
Right and left handed bolts used to tighten or loosen something down
(ground tackle)

Gypsy head
A cylindrical device on the deck used to take turns of line or wire around to heave in line or wire
(ground tackle)

Capstan
Cylindrical device on the deck used to tak turns oe or wire around to heave in line or wire
(ground tackle)

Detachable link
Connects two pieced of anchor chian together
(ground tackle)

Chain Marking
Shows how much chian is out from the deck to the anchor
(ground tackle)

Anchor
Uses to hold an anchor chain in place, which in return holds a vessel in place
(ground tackle)

Chain Stopper
Used to secure the chain and is a quick release
(ground tackle)

Pelican hook
Found on the end of a turnbuckle and is passed over a link of chain
(ground tackle)

Wildcat
A sprocket type drun that is used to haul in and pay out on a capstan
(Line Handling)

Hold
To not allow any more line to run out or take any in.
(Line Handling)

Check
To keep a strain on a line but to ease out only enough to prevent it from parting.
(Line Handling)

Ease
To do something slowly and keep the strain off of the line but not allow a caternary
(Line Handling)

Slack
To ease out a line and put a caternary in it
(Line Handling)

Take-in
To bring in lines from the pier
(Line Handling)

Cast-off
To remove lines from the pier fittings
(Line Handling)

Avast
To stop
(Line Handling)

Heave around
To haul in on a line
Line
Measured by circumference. Line 1 3/4" or smaller is known as small stuff and measured by threads
Wire rope
Classified by diameter and measured by the number of strands and number of wires in a strand.
(ground tackle)

Anchor brake
Used to stop the anchor chain. Brake pads are made of asbestos
(ground tackle)

Anchor buoy
A small float attached to the anchor by a line to mark the anchor's location
(marlinespike seamanship)

Hawser
Any line over 5 inches in circumference
(marlinespike seamanship)

Line
A piece of rope, either fiber or synthetic
(marlinespike seamanship)

Wire
Referred to as rope, made out of metal
(marlinespike seamanship)

Spring Lay
wire rope and plypropylene line constructed together to make one wire
(marlinespike seamanship)

Small Stuff
A general term for any line 1 3/4" in circumference or less
(marlinespike seamanship)

Flemish
The method starting with the bitter end and laying successive circle on the deck in a manner of a clock spring with the bitter end in the center. It is only for decoration
(marlinespike seamanship)

Coil
To lay in circled one on top of another
(marlinespike seamanship)

Fake
To lay a line in long flat bite alongside one another
(marlinespike seamanship)

Heaving line
a light weighted line thrown across to a ship or a pier when coming alongside to act as a messenger for the mooring line
(marlinespike seamanship)

Monkey fist (heaving ball)
A weighted ball of a heaving line
(marlinespike seamanship)

Marlin
Two-strandes, left-laid liine hemp. (small stuff)
(marlinespike seamanship)

Bight
A loop of rope, line, or chain
(marlinespike seamanship)

Bitter end
The free end of a length of wire, line or chain
(marlinespike seamanship)

Eye
The loop at the end of a wire or line
(marlinespike seamanship)

Eye splice
A short splice in line making a permanent loop
(marlinespike seamanship)

Long splice
Used to join two lines of the same size without changing the circumference of the line
(marlinespike seamanship)

Short splice
used to join to two lines togeterh without consideration in chaning the cricumference of the line
(marlinespike seamanship)

Marlinespike
A taper steel tool used for separating strande of wire rope and splicing
(marlinespike seamanship)

Fid
A sharply pointed, round wood used in separating strands of lines in splicing
(marlinespike seamanship)

Mousing
A seizing of line across a hook to prevent a sling from slipping off
(Line handling safety)

Direction of line pull danger area
Keep personnel as close to 90 degrees as possible from directional pull
(Line handling safety)

Safe distanced from blocks, cleats, gypsy heads, capstans, etc through which line passes
6 feet
(Line handling safety)

Removal of loose objects (i.e. rings, watches, keys, etc)
Does not give the line any obstacles to hook on
(Mooring)

Mooring Line
Hawsers used to secure a ship to the pier, wharf or alongside another ship
(Mooring)

Breast Line
Mooring lines that tend perpendicular to the ship's centerline
(Mooring)

Forward spring line
Mooring lines that tend aft that prevent forward movement
(Mooring)

Bow headline
forward most mooring line
(Mooring)

Stern line
After most mooring line
(Mooring)

Storm line/wire
Additional line, sprind lay and wire put out to hold the ship fast during inclement weather and storms
(Mooring)

Tattletale Line
Six thread spliced into a mooring to let you know when the line has reached its minimum safe working load
(Mooring)

Round Turn
A 360 degree turn around a bitt, cleat or samson post
(Mooring)

Figure eight turn
Line put from one side of the bitts to the other making an eight turn
(Mooring)

Dip the eye
To arrange the eyes of the mooring lines on bitts or bollards to separate the eye of another so that either line may be removed without disturbing the other
(Mooring)

Single up
To take in all doubled section of lines between the ship and the pier, leaving the vessel moored only by a single to the bitts or bollard
(Mooring)

Double up
to double mooring lines for added strength
(Mooring)

Heavy Strain
When a line or chain has meet or exceeded the safe working load
(Mooring)

Moderate strain
When the line or chain has reasonable amount of tension but has not reached its safe working load
(Mooring)

Light strain
When a line or chain is under a small amount of tension
(Mooring)

Frap
when you marry two mooring lines together with small stuff
(Mooring)

Rat guards
Round metal guards secured to mooring lines to prevent rodents off the ship
(Mooring)

Chafing gear
Canvas, line or other material placed around rigging and mooring lines to prevent wear
(Mooring)

Rat-tail Stopper
A braided tapering stopper used on mooring lines to temporary hold the line fast while making up to bitts
(Mooring)

Safe working load (SWL)
A formulated safety strength placed upon a object not to exceed
(Replenishment at sea)

Underway Replenishment (UNREP)
Connected Relenishment or Vertical Replenisment
(Replenishment at sea)

Vertical Replenishment (VERTREP)
Receiving stores or ammo wia helicopter
(Replenishment at sea)

Connected Replenishment (CONREP)
Receiving stores, fuel or ammo via another ship
(Replenishment operation)

Replenishment course
a course ordered by the officer of tactical command (OTC) to take into consideration of mission of the group and sea state
(Replenishment operation)

Replenishment speed
A speed ordered by OTC to take into consideration mission of the group and sea state. Normal speed 12-16 knots
(Replenishment operation)

Control Ship
The unit guide for UNREP. Usually the ship delivering will be combat logistic force (CLF). Delivery ship
(Replenishment operation)

Approach Ship
Makes the approach and keeps station on the control ship. Usually the receiving ship receives all shot lines. (With the following exceptions: CVN, LHA, LHD or if the receiving ship has a helo on deck)
(Replenishment operation)

Delivery Ship
Is the control ship (she will fly gold flag
(Replenishment operation)

Transfer station
A station on either ship where fuel, cargo, bombs and personnel can be transferred to or from.
(Replenishment operation)

Receiving ship
ship that makes the approahc, takes the repsonsibilities for the approach and keeping station alongside the delivery ship
(Underway Replenishment)

Inhaul/outhaul
Lines used to transfer cargo/personnel to and from the delivery and receiving stations. Inhaul/outhaul can be either wire or line and can be hand tended or winch operated.
(Underway Replenishment)

Messenger
A line made up of synthetic fibers that starts at 1 1/2 inches circumference and increases to 3 inches circumference. Used for sending the rig from the delvery station to the receiving station. The STAR messenger is 800' long of plaited polyester or 3 strand nylon
(Underway Replenishment)

Phone and Distance Line (T&D)
The phone and distance line has two functions. (1) Allows for communication between the two commanding officers (CO and CO X83). (2) Allows the coning officer to maintain the correct distance between the two ships during CONREP. The glags on the T&D line are 20 feet apart and color-coded. At night time chemical lights are placed alongside these flags so that the conning officer can better determine the distance between ships.
(Underway Replenishment)

Riding Lines
Used on the fule receiving stations to take the strain off the hoses while the hoses are hooked up to the risers on deck. The only time you will need to use riding lines is when you receive any fuel rig with the exception of a probe fuel rig (ROBB, NATO BREAKABLE SPOOL.) Riding lines are made of natural fibers. They are 4" manila and between 25-45 feet
(Underway Replenishment)

Tiedown
A line with an eye splice on both ends used to go around the fuel hose when you send a ROBB or NATO BREAKABLE SPOOL rig. These lines called tiedown are choked around the fuel hose and hooked up to the pelican hook on the free trolleys.
(Underway Replenishment)

Easing out line
Line used to ease the span wire or highline clear of the deck edge on the receiving ship. Used when the CONREP is complete and the Highline?Spanwire are de-tension. Usually made up from 12 to 21 thread manila with whipped ends
(Underway Replenishment)

Highline/Spanwire
Highline used for transferring cargo/bombs/personnel between delivery and receiving stations. Spanwire used on single or double hose fule rigs. The HST uses a 3/4" spanwire on our fuel delivering stations
(Underway Replenishment)

Probe/ROBB coupling
A large metal fitting that's connected to the end of the fuel hose to deliver fuel to either a Probe/ROBB fuel receiving station
(Underway Replenishment)

Station-to-Station phone line
Sound powered phone line proveded from the delivery ship and tended from the receiving ship. For the purpose of communication between the delivery and receiving stations