• Shuffle
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Alphabetize
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Front First
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Both Sides
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
  • Read
    Toggle On
    Toggle Off
Reading...
Front

How to study your flashcards.

Right/Left arrow keys: Navigate between flashcards.right arrow keyleft arrow key

Up/Down arrow keys: Flip the card between the front and back.down keyup key

H key: Show hint (3rd side).h key

A key: Read text to speech.a key

image

Play button

image

Play button

image

Progress

1/20

Click to flip

20 Cards in this Set

  • Front
  • Back
define continuous variable
a variable that can have any value
define categorical variable
a variable that can only have a certain number of specific values (breed, sex etc)
What data values can be used with normally distributed data?
mean, standard deviation, mode, median, range, quartiles
What data values can be used with skewed data?
mode, median, range, quartiles
what is nominal categorical data?
no inherent relationship between categories (breed, sex etc)
what is ordinal categorical data?
there is an ordering or ranking within the category (BCS, grade of a heart murmur)
what is a P value?
tells how likely the results of a study are due to chance
what P value is generally considered significant?
p<= 0.05
What is a type I error?
the study groups are not different, but we erroneously conclude they are
What is a type II error?
the study groups are different, but we erroneously conclude they are not
What is alpha?
the probability of making a type I error
what is beta?
the probability of making a type II error
What is power, in relation to statistical analysis?
ability to detect a difference between groups when there is a difference
power = 1-beta
What factors influence power?
# of animals in the study
magnitude of the difference between groups
variability of measurements
When is low power a concern?
when a statistical significance could not be found
could indicate that there is a relationship but the study was unable to detect it
What is a confidence interval?
indicate the reliability of an estimate
What level are confidence intervals usually calculated at?
95%
*can also be at 90, 99, 99.9 etc
What is survival analysis?
measures the time to an event
eg: death, calving, development of clinical signs, disease, discharge
What curve is used in survival analysis?
Kaplan-Meier
What is censoring?
the animal hasn't had the outcome by the end of the study or is lost to follow up, and therefore the survival time is unknown